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While designations are not everything when selecting a financial advisor, they often indicate a certain level of knowledge related to a specific field and/or commitment to certain ethical and professional standards. Please see our detailed Guide to Financial Advisor Designations for more information.

Availability

  • Guy Baker CFP®,AEP,ChFC,CLU

    Irvine, CA

    Retirement, Investing, Insurance

    1719 answers

    782 out of 961 people found Guy's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I'll be 70 1/2 in April, 2015. What do I do with my IRA & annuity?

    You are required to take the minimum distribution from your IRA account. This is based on your actuarial life expectancy and the percentage you take will increase every year you live. Your custodian knows the amount you will have to take as income. But the factor they use is 27.4 the first year. To get an estimate - divide that into the value of your IRA today. So if your IRA is $250,000, the income would be $250,000 divided by 27.4 = $9,124.They will calculate it for you and distribute it...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Craig Smalley EA,CEP

    Orlando, FL
    Henderson, NV
    Wilmington, DE

    Personal Finance, Taxes, Small Business

    901 answers

    236 out of 311 people found Craig's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I usually file my takes using the 1040EZ. I usually give at least $2,000 in charitable contributions a year. The charitable contributions are never listed on my tax forms. Does it benefit me to list them? Should I be using a different tax form?

    You have to use Schedule A of Form 1040 to claim charitable contributions.Craig W. Smalley, E.A.Admitted to Practice Before the Internal Revenue...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • J.R. Robinson

    Honolulu, HI

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    206 answers

    224 out of 239 people found J.R.'s answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I want to go to business school in 4-5 years, so I've opened a 529 (Vanguard funds) to help cover some of the tuition. Given the short time horizon and uncertain monetary policy / market conditions, how should I allocate my assets?

    My short answer is I would not use a 529 plan for this objective.  In more "normal investment options the bond fund or short term age-based options in these plans would offer the combination of modest yield and low volatility that would be appropriate for your short time horizon. However, given that we are at a time when interest rates are near historic lows, it can be argued that the conservative fund options within 529 plans have never been more risky (if interest rates rise, the...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Mark Nolan

    Carlsbad, CA
    Southfield, MI

    Retirement, Investing, Small Business

    38 answers

    11 out of 12 people found Mark's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    My company is requiring us to cash out or roll over our 401k because not enough people participate. I had a loan with only a small balance yet, will they still let me roll over into a IRA, without cashing out, or would I just need to pay the loan off. I only have 25 days to decide. What should I do?

    Because 401k loans cannot be transferred to IRAs ( see following:http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Retirement-Plans-FAQs-regarding-Loans ), your employer may allow you to transfer the outstanding 401k loan to another 401k. Therefore, if you are self-employed on the side you may be able to open an owner-only 401k (also known as a solo 401k plan) and subsequently transfer the loan to the new plan. You can then make the loan payments to the new solo 401k.  To see if you qualify for a solo...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Charles J Stevens Jr

    Plymouth, MA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    319 answers

    138 out of 154 people found Charles J's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    Should I convert one of my funds to an ETF so that I don't have to pay taxes every year?

    There are two kinds of ETF's, managed and indexed. Managed ETF's will trade the portfolio. Index ETF's will only make portfolio adjustments when a stock goes in or out of the underlying index. Thus, the ability to manage the tax liability in a taxable account leans heavily in favor of the index ETF.However, part of your explanation bothers me. If I understand your post, you do not want to pay capital gains taxes. I can sympathize with that, however.....There are two main types of indexes,...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Chris de Lorimier MBA

    Pasadena, CA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    294 answers

    186 out of 221 people found Chris's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I am 28, have never invested before, I don't have a ton of knowledge about how the market works, but I have about $7,000 in inheritance money I would like to put away for a while. I don't want it to be easily accessed by me, I don't want to pay an exorbitant amount in fees to a manager, but over time I would like it to increase in value significantly. How do I go about opening a Roth IRA to meet my needs and goals?

    Planning for your financial future and setting yourself up for success before leaving is essential to being financial successful. Before one dollar should be invested, you need to establish a financial plan and what your goals will be.  While financial freedom (being rich) seems to be everyone's goal, exactly what "freedom" means for you will be different from what it means to someone else.  Look at what you hope to do/save for in the next 5, 10, 30 years.  Will you be...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Larry McClanahan CASL®,CFP®,ChFC,CLU

    Clackamas, OR

    Retirement, Investing, Insurance

    364 answers

    391 out of 453 people found Larry's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I'm saving to purchase a home in 18 months. about $7,000 a month. I am looking for the best place to put the money until which time I need it for the purchase. Biggest gains, smallest fees, mild risk.

    18 months is too short a time frame to get even modestly adventurous with this type of savings goal, especially in the current environment of overpriced financial assets.Stay safe...and that means a savings or money market account or equivalent. You're barely going to earn enough interest to buy a candy bar (thank you, Federal Reserve!). But you need your $126,000 to be there in 18 months, not have "grown" to $95,000.Check out this NerdWallet link for a search tool that'll help you identify the...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Robert Maloney AEP,MSFS

    Holderness, NH

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Taxes

    15 answers

    5 out of 6 people found Robert's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have no debt, good credit, but only $4000 in savings (not including my 401k and IRA). I want to have enough money for a down payment on a $300k house in the next two years. I'm married with one toddler and our joint income is $200k. I'm 33 and my husband is 37. What's the best approach?

    With your level of joint income and good credit, borrowing should not be a major issue.  What you will need is the down payment of 20% or more for the purchase and if you have sufficient funds in your retirement accounts, you may be able to borrow from there.  Interest rates are at record lows again so this is the time to move ahead with your purchase SO LONG AS you plan to hold the house for more then 5 to 7 years.  Do not be tempted to purchase with less than 20% down and check...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • GreenPath Debt Solutions (NFCC) NFCC Certified Credit Counselor

    Farmington Hills, MI

    Personal Finance

    137 answers

    40 out of 46 people found GreenPath Debt Solutions's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    Why am I being told to take an installment loan to raise my FICO score? (Details below)

    Thanks for the question!FICO states that 10% of our score is based on the type of debt we have, and what they're looking for is diversity. So if you're only trade line is your credit card, this could be holding you back. I suggest you head to your local credit union or bank and take an installment loan out; then be sure to make the payments in full and on time each month. Keep in mind though that your current score, although lower than two weeks ago, is still considered excellent. Be sure your...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Aldo Waker AAMS

    Austin, TX

    7 answers

    4 out of 6 people found Aldo's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    Can someone please tell me more about SRI - Sustainable Responsible Impact Investing?

    The concept of SRI (Socially Responsible Investing) is that you invest in mutual funds that use certain metrics or methodologies that screen out companies that do not share the fund's philosophy. You can also invest in individual stocks that support your philosophy.  Many of my clients specifically request these funds and stocks and are fully aware that the returns may not be as good as a mutual fund that do not use such screens.  Traditionally, this has been the case.  But with...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
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