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  • FISC-CCCS of Northeast Wisconsin (NFCC) NFCC Certified Credit Counselor

    Menasha, WI

    Personal Finance

    47 answers

    15 out of 16 people found FISC-CCCS of Northeast 's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    How can I focus on earning more money than I spend?

    The underlying question I hear is how to manage money and a budget so you can live within your means. Increasing income is a great way to make a budget balance. You also need to know how much you spend each month so you have a target income amount. Bottom line to making a budget work is to increase income or decrease expenses so you balance. What are your skills and talents and how can you leverage them for a higher salary or possible side work? No one likes to ask for a raise but I...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Johanna Fox Turner CFP®,CPA

    Mayfield, KY

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Small Business

    1782 answers

    600 out of 677 people found Johanna's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    How many times can I use the back door IRA? Meaning, how many IRAs can I convert to Roth IRA in my life time if I make more than the income limit for a Roth IRA and put the max in my IRA as a lump sum every year?

    You can convert (as of now) an unlimited amount into a Roth, for an unlimited number of times. The door is wide open.From your question, my understanding is that you have no pre-tax TIRAs (Traditional IRAs) in your name. If I'm wrong, convert all pre-tax TIRAs to your Roth before you start to avoid paying taxes on the back door conversions.Once you begin with the back door strategy, here are a couple of suggestions:Keep a few dollars in your nondeductible TIRA so that you don't have to open a...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • J.R. Robinson

    Honolulu, HI

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    290 answers

    482 out of 502 people found J.R.'s answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have a 401k with my company, and an old rollover IRA through a different company. I don't know whether I should keep them separate or put the IRA into the 401k. Any suggestions?

    While consolidation is a benefit and there are one or two other reasons why transferring an IRA to a 401(k) may sometimes make sense in certain circumstances, I generally favor keeping the IRA separate.  Maintaining a separate IRA has the advantage of greater investment flexibility and likely greater cost control.  My guess is that the internal expenses in your Fido IRA mutual funds are lower than the expenses in your Nationwide 401(k).  Keeping expenses low is a key to...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Frank Boucher CFP®,CEBS

    Reston, VA
    Occoquan, VA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    109 answers

    52 out of 60 people found Frank's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I currently have 3 separate 401k accounts through my 2 previous employers and my current employer. Can you explain the pros/cons of leaving them as they are? Or consolidating them into a single account? Or if I consolidate, what the main differences are between a Roth IRA, Traditional IRA, 401k, etc?

    There are different points of view on this but usually I advise clients to move their old 401(k) plans into a Rollover IRA. Go to a no load mutual fund company, set up your IRA, and have your 401(k) accounts transferred into it. I say this because an IRA offers you unlimited investment options and it is usually less expensive to maintain the account. Some people will tell you to put your old 401(k) accounts into your current 401(k) account. If you have a good menu of reasonably priced...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Charles J Stevens Jr

    Plymouth, MA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    374 answers

    162 out of 184 people found Charles J's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have a 401k with my company, and an old rollover IRA through a different company. I don't know whether I should keep them separate or put the IRA into the 401k. Any suggestions?

    Part of the answer to your question is are you comfortable making investment decisions with your retirement money? An additional question is, what are the investment options available in your current plan? If you can diversify your total portfolio by investing your Rollover in real estate funds or venture capital funds for example, it might make sense to do that in the Fidelity account and keep the traditional stock and bond purchases to your 401(k).Realize however, that by running two...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Michael Rude EA

    Vista, CA

    Personal Finance, Taxes, Small Business

    52 answers

    20 out of 28 people found Michael's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    What can I do? I haven't filed my taxes in years.

    You should seek the help of a tax professional, enrolled agent (EA) or CPA, that will not only prepare your delinquent tax returns, but help you resolve any potential tax problems with IRS and the respective state tax agency if that applies to you. Being self employed, you will likely owe taxes and there are many EAs and CPAs who in addition to preparing taxes, can resolve potential tax problems with the IRS. They will be able to explain your options. While you may get your wage and income...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Brian McCann CFP®

    San Jose, CA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    352 answers

    123 out of 142 people found Brian's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    What are the best instruments to put a monthly contribution into to compound more interest than a 1% savings account?

    There are not a lot of great options for periods of time that short. One thing you could consider are longer term CDs or a CD ladder.  You can find more information here.I hope this...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Christopher Cannon AIF®,CFP®

    Pittsburgh, PA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Small Business

    7 answers

    3 out of 3 people found Christopher's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have a Fidelity Roth IRA with ~$8k and now my income exceeds the Roth limit. I plan on doing a backdoor contribution. I already have an empty rollover account, can I invest in that same rollover and then convert to my Roth account? Or do I need to create a new IRA account overtime?

    Vip nailed it.  You can add to the existing IRA with no issues then immediately convert to the Roth.  No need to open another one.  Just check with Fidelity on their processing procedures.  Where you will run into trouble though is if you have other money in the Traditional IRA that will be taken into account on the conversion.Here is an excellent article in the WSJ posted within the last year.  It explains the Back Door Roth...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Vip Patel CAIA

    Round Lake, IL

    Personal Finance

    23 answers

    10 out of 10 people found Vip's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have a Fidelity Roth IRA with ~$8k and now my income exceeds the Roth limit. I plan on doing a backdoor contribution. I already have an empty rollover account, can I invest in that same rollover and then convert to my Roth account? Or do I need to create a new IRA account overtime?

    You can add to your existing traditional IRA account. But note, for the purpose of converting to Roth IRA, all your traditional IRA accounts are taken together, to determine your tax eligibility at the time of conversion.Examples:1. If all of your traditional IRA balance is funded on after tax basis, you can convert to Roth without any further tax impact2. If 50% of your traditional IRA balance is pre-tax and 50% is after tax, whatever amount you convert to Roth, half of the converted amount...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Craig Smalley EA,CEP

    Orlando, FL
    Henderson, NV
    Wilmington, DE

    Personal Finance, Taxes, Small Business

    1050 answers

    297 out of 386 people found Craig's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    My daughter and husband are paid bi-monthly in W-2 forms with typical federal withholdings: Taxes+FICA+Medicare tax taken out. Are they considered independent contractors? Can they set up individual 401k or SEP pension sole plan? If not what is maximum they can set aside per year in an IRA per spouse? Is there anything creative they can do more than this?

    They are employees. They cannot set up a solo 401(k) or a SEP plan. The best they can do is put money into an IRA. The most money that they can put in is $5500.Craig W Smalley EAAdmitted to practice before the Internal Revenue...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
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