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While designations are not everything when selecting a financial advisor, they often indicate a certain level of knowledge related to a specific field and/or commitment to certain ethical and professional standards. Please see our detailed Guide to Financial Advisor Designations for more information.

Availability

  • Johanna Fox Turner CFP®,CPA

    Mayfield, KY

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    771 answers

    251 out of 272 people found Johanna's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I started a Roth IRA and I was wondering how I should allocate my funds. Can you suggest a fund allocation?

    So sorry your question has been overlooked - I hope it's not too late to help! The best allocation is in a well-balanced equity mutual fund portfolio. The one we use in our office is:17% Large Cap Growth17% Large Cap Value17% Small Cap Growth17% Small Cap Value17% International15% Real Estate (REIT) For a more comprehensive explanation of how to invest and manage your money for the long term, please read Simple Wealth, Inevitable Wealth.Good luck and I hope this...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Frank Boucher CFP®,CEBS

    Reston, VA
    Occoquan, VA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    34 answers

    16 out of 19 people found Frank's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    My home mortgage has been charged off and sold to another company. The new company is wanting me to pay my total amount due in 4 or less payments. What are my best options and can they take my home because I cannot pay it off on their terms?

    Please consult with an attorney right away. If you can't afford one, contact your local legal Aid Society office.Good luck to...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Richard Rosso CFP®,CIMA

    Houston, TX

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    28 answers

    23 out of 35 people found Richard's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have ~$5000 in a 401k from an old employer that I would like to rollover into an IRA or CD but can't decide which is the better option. Any suggestions?

    First, I would consider rolling over into an IRA. Establish an IRA with a full-service brokerage firm like Fidelity, establish the account and then contact your former employer to complete their paperwork to complete your rollover. Keep in mind this activity is a tax-reportable event, yet not taxable if the funds remain in the IRA. You'll have greater choices to invest based on your willingness to take on risk and time frame.Second, I'm confused by the "greatest return in shortest period of...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Jonathan Broadbent AIF®,CRPS

    Lyndhurst, OH

    Retirement

    4 answers

    1 out of 1 person found Jonathan's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I have ~$5000 in a 401k from an old employer that I would like to rollover into an IRA or CD but can't decide which is the better option. Any suggestions?

    Okay, so, like many things in finance, there are a few moving parts and terms to be straight on.  I know, not the simple answer you might be looking for, but perhaps a more honest one than you'll find at sales organizations.First: you should know that there are several types of IRAs.  The type of money in question (401(k) money) might move to a Rollover IRA or be held for a short time in a "Conduit IRA", which is sort of a holding account to keep the money segregated from other IRA...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Jim Ludwick CFP®

    Odenton, MD
    Washington, DC
    New York, NY
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Burlingame, CA

    Retirement, Investing, Insurance

    36 answers

    12 out of 17 people found Jim's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I was 62 in April. When do I have to sign up with Medicare?

    Most non-disabled age 65 US citizens or permanent residents of the United States are eligible for free Medicare hospital insurance (Part A).  Many people confuse being able to sign up for early retirement Social Security benefits at age 62 with Medicare eligibilty which usually begins at age 65. You can sign up for Medicare three months before your 65th birthday.  You do not have to sign up with Medicare since it is a voluntary program. In my experience, if...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Craig Smalley EA,CEP

    Orlando, FL
    Henderson, NV
    Wilmington, DE

    Personal Finance, Taxes, Small Business

    542 answers

    150 out of 243 people found Craig's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I am a small business owner of a single member LLC, I want to change it to a husband & wife joint venture. How do I go about doing that and what is the approximate cost?

    You amend the articles of organization in the State that you are organized in to add your spouse.  You would then file an election with the IRS to be taxed as a multi-member LLC.  The cost of that all depends on what the state fee for amended articles in your state, plus the fee for an accountant to file the paperwork with the IRS.Craig W. Smalley, E.A.Admitted to Practice Before the Internal Revenue...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Chris Chen CFP®,CDFA

    Waltham, MA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    415 answers

    224 out of 324 people found Chris's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I recently graduated residency and fellowship in July 2014 and have $338,000 in debt with ~7.2% rate. I wonder if I should focus more on retirement or loan payoff. Any suggestions?

    Congratulations on finally starting your career.  I know the $338K debt looks like a high mountain, and it is.  However, with your income of $25,000 after you should be able to do both.First, I would definitely invest for retirement.  Your group is probably offering a 401k.  If it does not it should.  You will be able to contribute up to $18,000 in 2015 tax deferred.  That will reduce your taxable income accordingly.  The advantage of doing that is that it...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Mark Prendergast CFP®,CPA

    Huntington Beach, CA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Taxes

    18 answers

    8 out of 9 people found Mark's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I'm 19, my Auntie died recently and she left me her bank accounts. How would I know who her beneficiaries are?

    1. By the phrase "left me her bank accounts", it sounds like you are the beneficiary of those accounts.  The bank can tell you that, if you are in fact the beneficiary.2. It may be that she just gave you signature authority, so you could sign checks but are not the beneficiary.  If that's the case, then ask the bank.  They may not tell you if you are not the beneficiary (just a "signor") and not the owner.3. Another possibility is that she put you on the account as a co-owner,...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Allan Moskowitz AIF®,CFP®

    El Cerrito, CA
    San Francisco, CA
    San Pablo, CA

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    112 answers

    120 out of 168 people found Allan's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I've moved states and am re-looking at 529 plans for my children. Many of them seem to have high fees compared to many of the index-type funds, but they do offer tax benefits. How do I balance the high fees versus the tax breaks they offer?

    Each state has different laws and rules regarding 529 plans.  Some states give tax deductions for in-state plans and some states for any state plan, and other states give no tax deduction for any 529 plan, like California.  Usually the tax break is more than the expense of the plan.  Plus, there are other ways to pay for college than just 529 plans.  It is impossible to be more specific than that with the information given.  You should contact someone with knowledge of...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
  • Timothy Fisher CFP®,AAMS

    Hanover, NH
    Wolfeboro, NH

    Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing

    6 answers

    2 out of 2 people found Timothy's answers helpful

    Most recent answer
    I'm 52 and only have about $22,000 in retirement savings (half in a 403b and half in a 457b plan). How can I prepare for retirement at, say, age 68?

    Assuming that you are currently employed, you should maximize the amount that you can put into your retirement plan. If you want to retire as you say at age 68, you now have 16 years that you can save that eventual retirement. The more you put into a tax deferred account the better. You would be well advised to examine your current budget to determine how you might be able to save more each year.The maximum that you can contribute to a 401(k) this year is $17,500, plus $5,500 because you are...more »

    Advisors offer free consultations to determine if you're a good fit for one another. Providing more information in the consultation request will help advisors have a better sense of what you're looking for. The advisor will contact you via email and set up a time to meet. Depending on the advisor, and your preferences, this could be an in-person or online meeting. You are under no obligation to engage them after meeting with them.
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