Martine Brousse

Martine Brousse

About Martine

“A patient advocate, I use knowledge and experience to help patients manage medical bills, reduce costs and save $. ”

I am a healthcare industry expert with over two decades of medical billing management experience and vast experience with the intricacies of navigating all types of payment claim issues. It was in direct response to what I saw as a lack of resources for patients to effectively anticipate and manage medical expenses that I created ADVIMED, my Patient Advocacy company.

Now working on the side of patients, I assist them with resolving the many issues they may face with medical providers and insurers. My services include: patient advocacy, bill auditing, fee negotiations, medical account management, research & education and mediation. I also lead family conferences to establish a course of action and ensure all parties are on board. 

Applying my insider knowledge, familiarity with all aspects of the healthcare industry, creativity and skills as a certified mediator, I present options, advise on strategy and find solutions. I foster collaboration and encourage dialogue to bring about successful resolutions. I bring patients the assurance that a bill is truly owed or a claim correctly processed, while safeguarding their rights.

I have written a guide to free resources, assistance, and support for cancer patients. In it, I present practical advice, cost-saving tips, and valuable information to help them locate resources in many forms.

I lecture at local Cancer Support Community Centers on various ways to save money and effectively resolve financial, insurance or billing issues. 

Read my weekly blog: " Patient Advocacy: Healthcare on your Side" for practical solutions, relevant information, useful news and insider tips on getting the best out of the healthcare industry. I strongly believe in educating and encouraging patients to become more active, and better informed participants in their care.

My goal as a professional private patient advocate goal is to provide my clients with personalized, expert, dedicated and trustworthy assistance. I pride myself on strong work ethics, compassion and integrity.

Even though there exists no established national or state certification or license, I abide by HIPAA guidelines and to the Patient Advocate Code of Conduct.

Education

certification, Mediation, American Institute of Mediation
M Sc, Metaphysical Sciences, UMS

Certifications

*Disclaimer:

Nothing is a guarantee in the healthcare business. But I am committed to providing you with my very best efforts and expertise, and thank you for your cooperation. My services are not covered by your health insurance.


Typical Clients

How I Can Help

Healthcare

Fee Structure

Commissions Hourly Other Asset-based Fee-only Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Typical minimum Client Assets:

No preference

Contact:

Phone: (424) 999-1631 Address: P.O. Box 43
Santa Monica, CA 90406
contact@advimed.us

Martine has answered 148 questions

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Martine Brousse
Answer added by Martine Brousse | 493 views
4 out of 5 found this helpful

I general yes. Charges for C/sections involve the use of the OR, the services of an anesthesiologist

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I general yes. Charges for C/sections involve the use of the OR, the services of an anesthesiologist and of a surgeon, as well as a longer hospital stay. All these charges (and including post op pain management, medications, supplies and  other services a regular delivery does not require) are expensive and may cost (tens of) thousands of dollars more than a regular delivery. 

Your cost will depend on your insurance and your policy. 

You will be responsible for a yearly deductible, yearly out-of-pocket costs (after you pay the deductible, your insurance pays a certain % of charges, leaving you with a balance) . In some cases you may be liable for a cop-pay every time you visit your doctor. 

Depending on those 3 figures, your liability in case of a C/Section may be higher. If you have a low deductible and/or out of pocket, you should not see a difference. Only the insurance payments to the various providers will be higher. 

If your liability is high, consider you will owe the full sum of these figures in case of a C/section. In case of a regular delivery, you might not. 

Also, your doctor will need to get an authorization to schedule a C/section, explaining the medical necessity (twins, serious underlining condition etc). If not, unless the C/section is due to an emergency, your insurance may reduce their payments, or even deny it as "not medically necessary". 

The best option is to contact your insurance customer service rep and ask about your yearly liability. Your physician should provide you with an estimate of costs. 

If you are a cash patient, now is the time to shop around and negotiate. Do not agree to any service without a written estimate and make sure you ask several providers and facilities for their best offer. 

Martine Brousse
Answer added by Martine Brousse | 112 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

The first thing I would recommend is to make a payment, however small, to show good faith and prevent

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The first thing I would recommend is to make a payment, however small, to show good faith and prevent collection action. 

Send your payment with a note you are working on a solution and asking for a billing manager to contact you regarding filing for "charity" through the hospital charity fund. While you wait for a response, your account should be marked as "pending" and not be sent to collection.

Good luck!

Martine Brousse
Answer added by Martine Brousse | 121 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

There are different kinds of patients advocates, helping patients deal with various aspects of the healthcare

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There are different kinds of patients advocates, helping patients deal with various aspects of the healthcare industry and safeguarding their rights. 

A medical billing advocate will usually have years of experience as a biller or coder, as well as exposure to the many financial issues that patients may face with their insurance or medical provider.

An advocate can help you negotiate fees down, review charges, appeal claims, manage accounts, research lower costs or assistance, and use your insurance policy and laws to your best advantage. They can also audit your statements and assure you that your claims were paid properly, and that the amount owed is truly accurate. 

When looking for a patient advocate to help you resolve a financial or billing issue, make sure you review their background and area of expertise. Like attorneys, doctors or accountants, advocates have specific skills and expertise.

Martine Brousse
Answer added by Martine Brousse | 60 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

First question: do you have medical insurance? If yes, send the bill to them,, and contact the hospital

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First question: do you have medical insurance? If yes, send the bill to them,, and contact the hospital billing department to give them the insurance information. 

If not, contact the billing department and ask about any financial assistance program, which many hospitals offer. Depending on your income, you may qualify for a partial or complete write-off of this bill. 

If you do not qualify, you should negotiate a settlement. It would be helpful to have a professional billing advocate or specialist audit the bill, price it at "usual and customary" rates then negotiate a settlement. If you prefer to do this yourself, go over each item on the itemized bill, and offer a prompt payment in full in exchange for a discount. 

Martine Brousse
Answer added by Martine Brousse | 15 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

First question is whether the doctor was paid by the insurance at the in or out of network rate. 

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First question is whether the doctor was paid by the insurance at the in or out of network rate. 

If it paid at the out of network rate, file an appeal with the insurer demanding they cover the cost at the higher rate. Per federal law, they MUST do so in cases involving an ER visit. You cannot be billed for more than you would have been if the doctor had been in network. 

If it was paid at the in network rate, contact your insurer and ask for a supervisor. The balance should have been written off by the provider, or a one-time contract made between him and them insurance. It is common to have such agreements: an additional payment is made and the balance written off. You must however request it. At least the supervisor should call the provider and demand they stop billing you.

Remember though, the physician may bill you for an amount (deductible, out of pocket, coinsurance) as indicated by your policy, and as long as it is in network.

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