Peter Ashby

Peter Ashby CFP®

Peter is a Financial Advisor. He helps clients build, manage, and preserve wealth, develop a plan for retirement and plan for wealth transition.

About Peter

“Peter Ashby is a fee-only Financial Planner located in Roseville, CA. ”

Peter Ashby,CFP® has been a practicing Financial Advisor since 2007. Starting his business in the midst of a global recession and banking crisis, Peter learned from the beginning, the dangers of unbalanced investments and excessive risk taking in portfolios. His mission is to educate his clients about their financial lives and work with them to achieve their goals. Always striving to be at the forefront of his profession, he has received his Certificate in Financial Planning from Boston University and has received his CFP® (CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™) designation. He specializes in retirement income, retirement accumulation, debt management and small business plans.

Education

Certificate, Financial Planning, Boston University
BA, History, CSU, Chico

Certifications

Designations

Registrations

Individual CRD #5292327

Certified Financial Planner (CFP) is a designation issued by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Completion of CFP-board registered study program, or alternative degree or certification, demonstrating mastery of over 100 topics surrounding financial planning
  • Pass 10 hour exam testing knowledge in financial planning situations

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree (or higher) from an accredited college or university, and
  • Three years of full-time personal financial planning experience

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: 30 hours every two years

Typical Clients

Doctors/physicians People near retirement Young professionals

How I Can Help

Retirement Investing Taxes

Fee Structure

Fee-only Hourly Asset-based Commissions Other Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Typical minimum Client Assets:

$250,000

Peter In The News

Contact:

Phone: 916-740-1116 Address: 967 Reserve Dr
Roseville, CA 95678
pete@adamsashby.com

Peter has answered 22 questions

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Peter Ashby
Answer added by Peter Ashby | 136 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

Aggressive means different things to different people, so my first recommendation would be to identify

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Aggressive means different things to different people, so my first recommendation would be to identify your risk tolerance.  You can find questionaires on Vanguard, Schwab, Fidelity, etc.....Once you've completed that, you will be able to identify what mix of equities and fixed income you should have.

Once you've completed this, the next 3 steps I recommend you take are as follows:

1.) Identify your which asset classes your equities are in.  If everything falls into Large Cap U.S. Equities, start looking into Small Cap and Mid Cap companies or indexes.  After that, take it  further by separating them into growth and value. 

2.) Look Internationally - Another way to diversify your portfolio is to look oversees.  These companies and indexes are typically divided into 2 classes: Developed and Emerging Markets.  You can gain good exposure to these through an ETF or Mutual Fund. 

3.) Consider different alternative asset classes.  REITS, High-Yield Bonds and Commodity funds are also worth researching as they tend to be aggressive yet diversify your portfolio even further.

Lastly, you should set up a re-balancing plan or a limit to how much each sector can represent in your portfolio.

Good Luck!

Peter Ashby
Answer added by Peter Ashby | 124 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

The only other possibility would be an HSA (Health Savings Account).  You can put up to $3,300 away

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The only other possibility would be an HSA (Health Savings Account).  You can put up to $3,300 away if you are singe or $6,550 for a family.  There is also an additional $1000 catch-up contribution if you are 55+.  You need to be enrolled in a High Deductible Health Plan to qualify for this account.

Good Luck!

Peter Ashby
Answer added by Peter Ashby | 119 views
5 out of 6 found this helpful

Possibly.There is a lot more information an advisor would need to properly assess your financial situation

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Possibly.There is a lot more information an advisor would need to properly assess your financial situation but I will give you a few pointers to get you started in the right direction.

1.) Create a spending plan (budget).  Do you know what you are currently spending now?  You state that you make 160k a year but is that gross or net of taxes? Also, you said that you are maxing out your 401k and 457.  Is that both of you or just one? The difference between saving $35k and $70k a year is significant and will change how much income you are trying to replace.   

2.) Create a retirement goal.  Some people can live off of $50k a year, some people want to live off $150k a year.  The reason it is important to create a spending plan is so you can make an informed decision about how much income you will need during your retirement years. Don't forget that you will have more time on your hands so don't be surprised if spending actually increases the first few years after retirement since you now have more time to travel, pursue hobbies and dine out. 

3.) Coordinate your benefits. You will need to decide at what age you want to retire. Make sure you know the best time and strategy for filing for your Social Security Benefits as this can change the amount you receive by around $100k. 

4.) Make your investment decisions.  Most people want to do this first but you will be in a much better position to make informed decisions if this is the last step in the process.  You will need to determine your risk tolerance and then compare that against the return you will need to reach your retirement income goal. 

There are other things you will need to do to prepare for retirement but hopefully this gets you started and on the right path.

Great job on getting your mortgage paid off as that can make your spending plan much more flexible during retirement.

Good Luck!

Peter Ashby
Answer added by Peter Ashby | 64 views
2 out of 3 found this helpful

It depends on what you mean by "most gain at the end".  If you own the exact same investments in

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It depends on what you mean by "most gain at the end".  If you own the exact same investments in both accounts, they will perform exactly the same way since you won't have to pay taxes on the gains each year.  You will start to notice a difference in the Traditional IRA when you turn 70 1/2.  You will be required to start taking a yearly minimum withdrawal or RMD which will reduce the amount in the account every year.  Then, as Larry said, you would be required to pay tax on this amount subject to income, deductions, etc..... 

If you are trying to figure out whether or not you should keep your Traditional IRA from the city retirement fund or convert it to a Roth IRA, you will need to forecast what your expected tax rate will be during retirement against what you will have to pay the year of conversion.

There is also other factors to consider such as what purpose the money will serve.  Are you trying to pass this money on to your heirs?  Do you want the flexibility to never have to withdraw the money or only years you choose? 

Good Luck!

Peter Ashby
Answer added by Peter Ashby | 105 views
2 out of 3 found this helpful

Good job aggressively going after your debt!  From the information you gave above, I would recommend

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Good job aggressively going after your debt! 

From the information you gave above, I would recommend you stay on your current path.   Depending on your risk tolerance, long term returns will most likely be somewhere between 5-8%. Since you are borrowing money at a cheaper rate than this, it makes saving in the 403b a good choice even without a match. 

 You should also consider it from a tax perspective.  Since you bring home around 8k a month, my guess is that you are well within the 25% federal tax bracket.  If you were to stop contributing to your husbands 403b, the additional $500 would be subject to that tax bracket (plus any state taxes you might have) which would greatly lower the amount you would actually be putting toward the loan.

 You are doing the right thing, pay off the higher interest rate loan first and then move on the lower ones next.  

Good Luck!

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