Robert Henderson

Robert Henderson CDFA

Robert is a Financial Advisor. He helps clients achieve financial independence, build, manage, and preserve wealth and develop a plan for retirement.

About Robert

“Independent Financial Planner / Investment Advisor. Specializes in retirement planning and the unique needs of divorcees”

Lansdowne Wealth Management, LLC ("LWM") is an independent wealth management firm based in Mystic, Connecticut that offers financial retirement strategies backed by education, knowledge, and experience that are supported by proven industry research. Our clients depend on us to provide personalized, thoughtful service and advice. As a fee-only Registered Investment Advisor, we present you with objective, independent guidance for achieving your goals. Successful individuals and families in southeastern Connecticut, Rhode Island and throughout the United States rely on us to guide the way so they can be confident in their futures.Our goal is to provide our clients with the most complete Asset and Wealth Management services available. From the very beginning, our objective is to provide individual investors with the same level of sophisticated management as institutional investors. We are proud to say that the services our clients receive rival that of large institutions. In addition to providing portfolio management services, we also provide our clients with the opportunity to access our comprehensive Financial Planning and Wealth Management services. Robert C. Henderson is the President and Advisor at LWM. Prior to founding the firm, Mr. Henderson was a financial advisor with a nationally recognized brokerage firm. His previous experience included numerous senior corporate financial positions, including Director of Finance and Accounting and Controller positions. Mr. Henderson holds a BS degree in Accounting from Bentley University, earned the Accredited Asset Management Specialist (AAMS) designation from the College for Financial Planning, and is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA).

Education

BS, Accounting, Bentley University

Certifications

Designations

Registrations

Individual CRD #5089860

Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA) is a designation issued by the The Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Self-study course consisting of four modules
  • Modules 1-3 end with multiple choice exams, module four concludes with a case-study exam

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • Three years of experience as a financial professional, accountant, or matrimonial lawyer

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: 15 divorce-specific hours every two years

Insurance License:

CT #002266283

Typical Clients

Divorcing couples Engineers/scientists People near retirement

How I Can Help

Personal Finance Retirement Investing

Fee Structure

Fee-only Hourly Other Commission and Fee Commission Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Contact:

Phone: (860) 245-2719 Address: 31 Willow St, 2nd floor
Mystic, CT 06355
bhenderson@lwmwealth.com

Robert has answered 107 questions

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Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 2717 views
7 out of 8 found this helpful

Well, this is the sort of situation where there is no simple or straight-forward answer. Honestly, no

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Well, this is the sort of situation where there is no simple or straight-forward answer. Honestly, no matter what you choose to do, you will be making some type of sacrifice.

I don't know what your family situation is, or how you spend your money, but right now, it seems you are paying about 15% of your take-home pay (after tax) on just your credit and loan repayments. And based on making those payments, it is still going to take you a long time to pay off your debts.

However, taking money out of a retirement account will not only cost you in taxes, but also in penalties. Based on your income level (not sure if you are single or married), if you took out an additional 35K from your 403B to extinguish your CC debt, you would likely pay around 30-40% in taxes and penalties (not sure if you have a state income tax), which leaves you with only about 20-25K. That's a big price to pay, and still would not completely erase your debt.

Now, the other option is that you stop your current 403B contributions and re-direct that cash-flow towards debt re-payment. It will take longer, but in the end it may end up costing you less. I also recommend that you look at other ways to increase cash flow through reducing your expenses. 

Paying down your credit card this way will also help your credit score as well (assuming other areas of your credit are OK).


Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 46 views
4 out of 4 found this helpful

Yes, you need to record that as rental income, especially if you plan to deduct any of the expenses of

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Yes, you need to record that as rental income, especially if you plan to deduct any of the expenses of the property. And if you charge your daughter less than FMV for the lease (which it sounds like you are, since her payments are not covering the mortgage), then the tax deductions may be dissallowed and the home classified as a second home/vacation property.

I would recommend consulting with a CPA to get clarification on your specific situation.

Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 2359 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

There are a lot of factors to consider, and the previous answers gave you a lot of good ideas. Probably

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There are a lot of factors to consider, and the previous answers gave you a lot of good ideas. Probably the situation where it would make the MOST sense, is if you have a good credit score, will NOT put a lot of miles on your car, want the predictability and affordability of lower monthly payments (versus buying) and do not want to worry about the cost of maintenance (often covered in lease).


Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 96 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

Regardless of whether the CD is due to be redeemed, the IRS still requires a minimum distribution (RMD),

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Regardless of whether the CD is due to be redeemed, the IRS still requires a minimum distribution (RMD), which is based on your age each year. You can go to the IRS website here to determine the percentage you need to withdraw.

In the year you turn 70.5, you are not required to make your initial RMD until April 1 of the year FOLLOWING the year in which you turn 70.5. After that, RMD's are due to be withdrawn by December 31 each year. The amount of the withdrawal is based on your age, and the account balance(s) at the beginning of each year.

Even if your CD is not due to mature yet, most banks will allow RMD withdrawals penalty-free (or you may forego interest on that portion of the balance). Your bank will help you with the rules and the withdrawals.

Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 887 views
3 out of 4 found this helpful

The US Government Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) is a basic retirement savings plan similar to a private 401(K)

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The US Government Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) is a basic retirement savings plan similar to a private 401(K) plan.

While the savings vehicle itself is not unlike a 401K plan regarding contribution rules and tax-deferred savings, the investment options within the TSP plan leave much to be desired.

The plan consists of 5 investment options:
1. Short-term Treasury Fund (G Fund)
2. Fixed Income Fund (F Fund, essentially mirroring the Barclays Aggregate Bond Index)
3. S&P 500 Index Fund (C Fund)
4. Small Cap Stock Fund (S Fund)
5. International (EAFE) Stock Index Fund (I Fund)

In addition, the TSP offers a range of Lifecycle Funds which are simply mixes of the above offered funds.

The advantage of the plan is that the expenses of the various funds are extremely low - lower than most available retail index funds and ETF's. However, shaving a few basis points of expenses off the funds cannot avoid poor performance.

There are some key investment areas (asset classes) that are missing from the lineup, that could play an important role in a well-diversified portfolio. Primarily Real Estate, Commodities, International or Global Bonds, Emerging Markets Equity, and some other fixed-income classes that are less-correlated to the Aggregate Bond Index (which is Treasury-heavy) such as mortgage backed securities, high-yield bonds, and floating rate bonds. This will be especially important in a period of rising interest rates (which we have generally not experienced in over 30 years).

Having said that, it is still possible to develop a fairly well-balanced portfolio within the TSP plan, at very low cost.

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