Robert Henderson

Robert Henderson CDFA

Robert is a Financial Advisor. He helps clients achieve financial independence, build, manage, and preserve wealth and develop a plan for retirement.

About Robert

“Independent Financial Planner / Investment Advisor. Specializes in retirement planning and the unique needs of divorcees”

Lansdowne Wealth Management, LLC ("LWM") is an independent wealth management firm based in Mystic, Connecticut that offers financial retirement strategies backed by education, knowledge, and experience that are supported by proven industry research. Our clients depend on us to provide personalized, thoughtful service and advice. As a fee-only Registered Investment Advisor, we present you with objective, independent guidance for achieving your goals. Successful individuals and families in southeastern Connecticut, Rhode Island and throughout the United States rely on us to guide the way so they can be confident in their futures.Our goal is to provide our clients with the most complete Asset and Wealth Management services available. From the very beginning, our objective is to provide individual investors with the same level of sophisticated management as institutional investors. We are proud to say that the services our clients receive rival that of large institutions. In addition to providing portfolio management services, we also provide our clients with the opportunity to access our comprehensive Financial Planning and Wealth Management services. Robert C. Henderson is the President and Advisor at LWM. Prior to founding the firm, Mr. Henderson was a financial advisor with a nationally recognized brokerage firm. His previous experience included numerous senior corporate financial positions, including Director of Finance and Accounting and Controller positions. Mr. Henderson holds a BS degree in Accounting from Bentley University, earned the Accredited Asset Management Specialist (AAMS) designation from the College for Financial Planning, and is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA).

Education

BS, Accounting, Bentley University

Certifications

Designations

Registrations

Individual CRD #5089860

Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA) is a designation issued by the The Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Self-study course consisting of four modules
  • Modules 1-3 end with multiple choice exams, module four concludes with a case-study exam

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • Three years of experience as a financial professional, accountant, or matrimonial lawyer

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: 15 divorce-specific hours every two years

Insurance License:

CT #002266283

Typical Clients

Divorcing couples Engineers/scientists People near retirement

How I Can Help

Personal Finance Retirement Investing

Fee Structure

Fee-only Hourly Other Commission and Fee Commission Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Contact:

Phone: (860) 245-2719 Address: 31 Willow St, 2nd floor
Mystic, CT 06355
bhenderson@lwmwealth.com

Robert has answered 65 questions

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Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 1999 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

There are a lot of factors to consider, and the previous answers gave you a lot of good ideas. Probably

more »

There are a lot of factors to consider, and the previous answers gave you a lot of good ideas. Probably the situation where it would make the MOST sense, is if you have a good credit score, will NOT put a lot of miles on your car, want the predictability and affordability of lower monthly payments (versus buying) and do not want to worry about the cost of maintenance (often covered in lease).


Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 1973 views
4 out of 5 found this helpful

Well, this is the sort of situation where there is no simple or straight-forward answer. Honestly, no

more »

Well, this is the sort of situation where there is no simple or straight-forward answer. Honestly, no matter what you choose to do, you will be making some type of sacrifice.

I don't know what your family situation is, or how you spend your money, but right now, it seems you are paying about 15% of your take-home pay (after tax) on just your credit and loan repayments. And based on making those payments, it is still going to take you a long time to pay off your debts.

However, taking money out of a retirement account will not only cost you in taxes, but also in penalties. Based on your income level (not sure if you are single or married), if you took out an additional 35K from your 403B to extinguish your CC debt, you would likely pay around 30-40% in taxes and penalties (not sure if you have a state income tax), which leaves you with only about 20-25K. That's a big price to pay, and still would not completely erase your debt.

Now, the other option is that you stop your current 403B contributions and re-direct that cash-flow towards debt re-payment. It will take longer, but in the end it may end up costing you less. I also recommend that you look at other ways to increase cash flow through reducing your expenses. 

Paying down your credit card this way will also help your credit score as well (assuming other areas of your credit are OK).


Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 5740 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

I have always been a fan of paying down debt first, especially in our current interest rate environment.

more »

I have always been a fan of paying down debt first, especially in our current interest rate environment. Just think about it for a moment. For every dollar you pay off in debt, you earn a rate of return equal to the interest rate on that debt.

Having said that, it's also important not to completely drain your savings. It's important to keep SOME level of savings, and also have a credit card to fall back on in an emergency.

If possible, I would leave your savings where it is, and take any excess income you have to increase your debt payments.

Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 634 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

I agree with Frank that Morningstar is a great resource. I would add that Yahoo Finance is really one

more »

I agree with Frank that Morningstar is a great resource. I would add that Yahoo Finance is really one of the best, and simplest tools out there for tracking investments, especially if you just want a quick "snapshot" of price movement each day.

Robert Henderson
Answer added by Robert Henderson | 110 views
2 out of 2 found this helpful

Look at it this way...while saving for a house is a valuable goal, and there are some financial incentives

more »

Look at it this way...while saving for a house is a valuable goal, and there are some financial incentives to buying a house (equity build, possible tax savings), it will actually end up costing you MORE in the long run by continuing to maintain high-interest, non-deductible debt.

While you ultimately have to make the decision for yourself, I would always recommend to my clients that they extinguish revolving CC debt prior to buying a house.

In addition, I would not recommend using ALL of the funds to extinguish debt. You still need to maintain a cushion. 

But economically, it makes no sense to be saving/investing, while taking those earnings and paying them out the other end in the form of interest payments.

My recommendation would be to come up with a plan for when you would like to pay off your credit cards by, and map out a schedule of how much to pull from current earned income, as well as from savings/investments to get you there.

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