Mark Porter

Mark Porter CFA, CFP®

About Mark

“A CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional with a focus on Financial Education ”

As a financial planner, Mark is dedicated to serving the investment and financial needs of his clients by offering an unbiased financial planning approach using a wide variety of products and services. His goal is to build long-lasting relationships formed around trust and honest communication.

Mark helps clients work toward their financial objectives by becoming their personal Chief Financial Officer and presenting clients with options and strategies toward helping accomplish what is important to them.

As an associate of Northeast Planning Associates, Inc. (NPA), Mark has experience in Retirement Planning, Wealth Management, Advanced Estate Planning, Tax Management, Education Planning, and Qualified Plans. Mark holds the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Series 7 and 66 registrations through LPL Financial.

As a CFP® and CFA®, Mark holds two of the most prestigious designations in the world of financial planning and asset management, and is dedicated to being an ongoing student of the Financial Planning industry. He received a BA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Sloan School of Management.

Mark serves as the Chairman of the Finance Committee in the town of Canton. He is also an Eagle Scout and Scoutmaster in his Boy Scout Troop.

Mark and his wife Anna live in Canton, Massachusetts. Mark enjoys hiking and is in pursuit of climbing New Hampshire’s forty-eight, 4,000 foot peaks.

Education

BS, Finance, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Certifications

Designations

Registrations

Individual CRD #4943237

Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) is a designation issued by the CFA Institute

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Completion of self-study program, generally requiring 250 hours of study for each of the three levels, focused on various investment management concepts
  • Three 6-hour course exams testing competency, integrity and extensive knowledge

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree (or higher) from an accredited college or university, and
  • Four years of qualified work experience

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: None

Certified Financial Planner (CFP) is a designation issued by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Completion of CFP-board registered study program, or alternative degree or certification, demonstrating mastery of over 100 topics surrounding financial planning
  • Pass 10 hour exam testing knowledge in financial planning situations

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree (or higher) from an accredited college or university, and
  • Three years of full-time personal financial planning experience

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: 30 hours every two years

*Disclaimer:

Financial planning offered through Northeast Planning Associates, Inc. (NPA), a Registered Investment Adviser.  Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Adviser and member FINRA/SIPC.  NPA and LPL Financial are not affiliated. www.finra.org www.spic.org

Mark Porter may only discuss and/or transaction business with residents of the following states: MA, NH, RI, OH, CA, IL, PA, GA


Typical Clients

Engineers/scientists Young couples Young professionals

How I Can Help

Personal Finance Retirement Investing

Fee Structure

Asset-based Fee-only Commissions Hourly Other Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Typical minimum Client Assets:

$100,000

Contact:

Phone: (774) 567-2517 Address: 633 Chapman St
Canton, MA 02021
Address: 144 South Main St
Cadiz, OH 43907
mark.porter@lpl.com

Mark has answered 7 questions

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Mark Porter
Answer added by Mark Porter | 736 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

Its tough to say in a vacuum whether $18k in dividends from $620k is good or bad.  Its important to

more »

Its tough to say in a vacuum whether $18k in dividends from $620k is good or bad.  Its important to understand your investment objective and Total Return (which includes capital appreciation).

A $2,000 per month withdrawal represents about a 3.9% annual withdrawal rate.  Advisors often target keeping the rate of withdrawal no higher than 4% to 5%.

Finally, the advisory fee appears to be about 1%, which in my opinion is average for standard advisory services. 

Mark Porter
Answer added by Mark Porter | 108 views
3 out of 5 found this helpful

It is a term policy, generally paid for on your behalf by your employer.  You can name a beneficiary

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It is a term policy, generally paid for on your behalf by your employer.  You can name a beneficiary for the policy, but more than likely, when you leave employement with the company, you will lose it.

Mark Porter
Answer added by Mark Porter | 173 views
1 out of 2 found this helpful

I'd recommend that you don't over think it.  Cash reserves, whether they are checking, (online)

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I'd recommend that you don't over think it.  Cash reserves, whether they are checking, (online) savings, money market, are likely going to always lose money versus inflation but save you in the event they prevent you from putting something on a credit card.  

While it's easy to say you could make some money shopping for the best money market account or laddering CDs but its a waste of your time.  Due to the shape of the yield curve, most banks (including prominent online banks) are actually paying more on their money market accounts than they currently do on their CDs.

Further, if you make an extra 0.25% on $5,000 of savings, you're making an extra $12.50 per year.  If it took you much more than an hour to do the research, open the account and add it to your taxes, you made less than minimum wage.  

I wish I could give you more constructive advice, but in my opinion a money market or savings account is the best place to start right now until you are ready to start investing for long term goals.  Other options might sound sexy but don't hold up.


Mark Porter
Answer added by Mark Porter | 97 views
1 out of 2 found this helpful

You can request your 401(k)'s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for more information regarding the rules

more »

You can request your 401(k)'s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for more information regarding the rules of your plan.

If your plan is small enough, or you know the decision makers, you may even consider asking them to add the 'inservice withdrawal' option if it is not currently available and you have determined taking a rollover is in your best interest

Mark Porter
Answer added by Mark Porter | 74 views
0 out of 0 found this helpful

While 2.5% sounds high to me (that is actually the max my broker dealer allows us to charge), you have

more »

While 2.5% sounds high to me (that is actually the max my broker dealer allows us to charge), you have to ask what you are getting for that 2.5%.  I would ask your advisor what you are getting for that fee and perhaps seek out a referral from a friend to speak with another advisor to find out what they would charge for a comparable service.

Fees are not necessarily a bad thing, its important to focus on what you get as much as on what you pay.

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