Chad Nehring

Chad Nehring CFP®

Chad is a Financial Advisor. He helps clients achieve financial independence, build, manage, and preserve wealth and develop a plan for retirement.

About Chad

“CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner. Speaker/Trainer with a common sense approach to personal financial planning.”

My name is Chad Nehring. I am a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner and a partner at Conceptual Financial Planning, Inc. and Conceptual Financial Advisors, LLC both located in Appleton, WI. I am also founder of MyFirstFinancialPlanner.com, an online financial planning service designed for those using a financial planner for the first time, and looking to "Get on Track". You can find more information at http://www.myfirstfinancialplanner.com .I specialize in providing understandable, common sense financial planning guidance to families, done in an unbiased and independent fashion. I believe that no two families' financial situations are alike, and one's value system is a big determiner in how their finances are handled. I enjoy speaking and teaching, and doing so in an engaging fashion that employs humor...yes this is possible in finance! I've been featured in many news outlets, including online at MSNBC, Registerd Rep magazine, CNN.com, Currency.com and local television and radio.In my spare time, I enjoy being a tech-geek and spending time in the Northwoods, either camping or snowmobiling.

Certifications

Designations

Registrations

Firm CRD #167513

Certified Financial Planner (CFP) is a designation issued by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards

Educational/Exam Requirements:

  • Completion of CFP-board registered study program, or alternative degree or certification, demonstrating mastery of over 100 topics surrounding financial planning
  • Pass 10 hour exam testing knowledge in financial planning situations

Prerequisites/Experience Requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree (or higher) from an accredited college or university, and
  • Three years of full-time personal financial planning experience

Public Disciplinary Process? Yes

Continuing Education Requirements: 30 hours every two years

Insurance License:

WI #2413183

*Disclaimer:

Advisory Services offered through Conceptual Financial Advisors, LLC and/or Conceptual Investment Advisors, Inc. both of which are Registered Investment Advisors in the State of Wisconsin. 

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board's initial and ongoing certification requirements.



Typical Clients

People near retirement Young couples Young professionals

How I Can Help

Personal Finance Retirement Investing

Fee Structure

Commission and Fee Hourly Fee-only Commission Other Contingency
Learn more about how advisors are paid in our Guide to Advisor Compensation.

Typical minimum Client Assets:

No preference

Chad In The News

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Contact:

Phone: (920) 659-7669 Address: 3962 N. Richmond St.
Appleton, WI 54913
cnehring@conceptualadvisors.com

Chad has answered 279 questions

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Chad Nehring
Answer added by Chad Nehring | 15841 views
27 out of 29 found this helpful

I see vesting hasn't been addressed.  Let's discuss it.  Vesting refers to the amount of time

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I see vesting hasn't been addressed.  Let's discuss it. 

Vesting refers to the amount of time you have been employed by the employer, and refers to the money that the employer puts into the plan for you (if any). 

Generally, you are always 100% invested in your OWN money, the hard dollars you contributed into the plan.  If you leave, you'll take that money with you. 

The employer's contributions (matching dollars, profit sharing, etc.) are usually subject to a vesting schedule.  In a 401(k), there are many options, with the most common ones that I see being five years.  In the first year, 0% of the employers dollars would be yours if you leave, then 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and finally 100% after five years, when you are considered "fully vested".  There are also other vesting schedules. 

Certain plans (Safe Harbor 401(k) plans, Simple IRA's come to mind) have 100% full and immediate vesting. The trade off in some cases for the employer is less administrative time and expense (generally in the Simples).

The portion you don't get is called "forfeiture" and is placed into a general fund in the 401(k) plan, where your employer can use it to pay for plan administrative expenses, or for matching dollars, at their discretion.  

Your Summary Plan Document (call it the FAQ for your retirement plan) will have more information.  You should have received a copy of it when you enrolled in the plan. If not, just ask your HR person for a copy. 

Chad Nehring
Answer added by Chad Nehring | 2022 views
7 out of 7 found this helpful

Ask 100 different advisors a question and you'll generally get 100 different answers.  However,

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Ask 100 different advisors a question and you'll generally get 100 different answers.  However, on this topic, you'll find a pretty polarized community. 

I echo Jon's recommendation:  TERM.  It fit's what you are looking for, and that's protection. Pure protection. 

The permanent life salespeople I'm certain will have a dozen canned rebuttals for this recommendation, and certainly if you've used up every other bit of tax deferred savings opportunities (401k, IRA, Roth, etc.) then some whole life can't hurt.  But, there's a reason whole life is "sold" ...the commissions paid to agents that sell this stuff is high. 

In my opinion, there are a few (VERY FEW) circumstances where permanent insurance makes sense, most of which go beyond your question and so don't merit mentioning. 

Work with a good local independent agent who primarily does term, and will research rates with many different companies for you.  You'll get the same rates that you would get online, and you'll have a local contact. 

Chad Nehring
Answer added by Chad Nehring | 1941 views
14 out of 16 found this helpful

Generally with this response it will mean that your bank (or the debit card issuer) has noted an unusual

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Generally with this response it will mean that your bank (or the debit card issuer) has noted an unusual pattern of transactions, and they will freeze the account temporarily. 

A call to your bank or to the number listed on the back of the card will yield much more information to you.  Usually it's not a negative, they are just being cautious which is to your benefit.  

Chad Nehring
Answer added by Chad Nehring | 993 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

Your plan would work (sell the stock for low/no capital gains and put it into a Roth for your mother)

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Your plan would work (sell the stock for low/no capital gains and put it into a Roth for your mother) save for this one important thing. It doesn't sound from your description that your mother has earned income making her eligible.  It also isn't clear if your father has earned income either (which would allow your mother to "borrow" it for the purposes of making a Roth Contribution.  

Was your mother or father employed in 2013?  If so, you could use that income and in theory, make a 2013 Roth contribution (from the sale of the stock) up until the earlier of when they file their taxes or April 15th.  

Your idea is a worthy one, as it would indeed provide some tax preference and negate the need for required distributions down the road. However, the "golden ticket" of earned income is going to be needed first.  

Chad Nehring
Answer added by Chad Nehring | 4110 views
3 out of 3 found this helpful

I'd say this depends on the plan options and also if you would have the discipline to invest on your

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I'd say this depends on the plan options and also if you would have the discipline to invest on your own.  

First, let's tackle the plan options. If the employer's plan is a high-cost group annuity, or has plan options that are expensive in the terms of expense ratio, then you might be better off doing things on your own with a lower cost option.  If the plan options are decent, meaning they are generally low-to-average cost, and well diversified, then go to the second question.

That is, do you have the discipline to save on your own, if you were to do that?  If you would start something on your own, but then not remember to fund it...you are better off doing the employer's plan.   Let the ease and simplicity of a payroll deduction work for you.  

Either way, it's important that you are at least doing SOMETHING.  Don't let the absence of an employer match be a deterrent to you.  My experience has been when employers don't have matches that they are committing those dollars towards overall company growth and that's not necessarily a bad thing in the long run. 

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