How to Travel to Dallas-Fort Worth on Points and Miles

Here's how to save money on your flight and hotel in Dallas-Fort Worth by leveraging your travel rewards.
Michael McHughJul 21, 2021

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One of the top 10 most-populated areas in the U.S., the Dallas-Fort Worth area has a lot to offer out-of-towners. Live music in the Deep Ellum district, tours of local distilleries, Texas barbecue, a downtown architecture tour and live performances in the Arts District are a few of the experiences that attract visitors. You can also stop by Six Flags Over Texas, AT&T Stadium (home of the Dallas Cowboys) and the Katy Trail, a former abandoned railroad line that is now a paved trail.

Lean on to make your vacation logistics more affordable. Here’s how to travel to Dallas-Fort Worth on points and miles.

As you’re starting to think about booking an affordable Dallas-Fort Worth trip, note that two airports serve the area:

Though it’s farther away, Dallas-Fort Worth International offers more flights — about 1,850 per day versus Love Field’s 600 flights per day. From either airport, public transportation is relatively limited, so a rideshare or rental car are generally the best ways to get to the city centers.

American Airlines and Southwest Airlines are both headquartered in Texas. This offers travelers the ability to fly to many domestic and international destinations with nonstop flights.

However, most major domestic carriers fly regularly into and out of the city. No matter your origin and preferred airline, you should be able to find a flight that works for you.

You can book a nonstop flight from most U.S. cities to either Dallas-Fort Worth or Dallas Love Field. Here's how some redemption opportunities typically look.

For American Airlines flights less than 500 miles from Dallas-Fort Worth, using 7,500 miles to fly economy or 15,000 American miles to fly business class is one of your best options.

For flights up to about 1,150 miles in distance, it pays to have British Airways Avios. It often costs 9,000 Avios to book an economy flight to DFW (or 16,500 Avios to fly business class) on American Airlines due to the .

For Southwest, the number of points you need to book a flight is tied to the cash cost of the flight. Generally, you’ll need 5,000 to 10,000 points to book a one-way flight from a Southwest hub, like Chicago-Midway, to the Dallas area.

Delta prices vary, but often you can fly from a Delta hub city, like Los Angeles, New York-JFK or Atlanta, starting at around 5,000 SkyMiles each way in economy. If you have Air France/KLM , you can use them to book a flight on Delta. Expect to use about 11,500 to 14,500 Flying Blue miles for a Delta economy ticket, or 30,000 to 36,000 miles for a business class flight from a Delta hub city, like Atlanta.

To fly United to the Dallas area, consider using United’s own miles or Air Canada , Singapore Airlines , Avianca or Turkish Airlines .

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Knowing how to fly to Dallas-Fort Worth with miles is one thing, but knowing which hotels to book with points is a game-changer. Marriott, Hilton and Hyatt have options ranging from budget to luxury properties in the Dallas area for award travelers.

If luxury is what you’re after, check out the . Amenities include a spa, a fitness center, an outdoor pool and an American restaurant.

Cost to book in points: Rooms start at 60,000 points per night for standard rates, 45,000 points during off-peak nights and 70,000 points during peak nights at this Category 7 Marriott Bonvoy property. NerdWallet values Marriott Bonvoy points at  per point.

This Ritz-Carlton charges $25 per night per room for a “destination fee,” which covers internet access, the Spa’s lounge, a daily $25 food and beverage credit, a JFK Trolley Tour, one in-room cocktail per day, and a daily “guacamologist” educational experience, complete with a signature margarita.

An upscale hotel in a building from the 1910s is what you’ll find in . Guests have access to a French restaurant, a rooftop pool restaurant, a Viennese coffee shop, a lobby bar, a European-style restaurant, a gym and a pool.

Cost to book in points: Rooms start at 35,000 points per night for standard rates, 27,000 points during off-peak nights and 40,000 points during peak nights at this Category 5 Marriott Bonvoy hotel.

The can earn you Marriott Bonvoy points for your stay. Some of the card’s top perks include earning 6x points at Marriott properties, a $300 statement credit when you make qualifying Marriott purchases, a free night award at a property valued up to 50,000 points per night, complimentary Gold elite status and a $100 property credit on qualifying purchases at the Ritz-Carlton or St. Regis. Terms apply.

Cardmembers can use the $300 credit at both hotels, the free night award at The Adolphus and the property credit at the Ritz-Carlton. New cardmembers can also earn welcome bonus points:

If you want hotel elite status, but don’t want to commit to a , consider , which also comes with automatic Marriott Gold Status. Its points can typically be transferred to the Bonvoy program at a 1:1 ratio. Terms apply.

Located in a 1950s-era building, offers guests a diner, an Asian restaurant, a cocktail bar, bowling, live music, a rooftop pool and bar, and a gym.

Cost to book in points: Depending when you stay, you might find rooms here starting around 58,000 Hilton Honors points per night. NerdWallet values Hilton points at per point.

Set in the Arts District, the amenities include an American restaurant, a gym, a rooftop pool and cafe/bar, and an art collection.

Cost to book in points: Rooms tend to start at around 70,000 Hilton Honors points per night.

With the , you get Gold elite status, the ability to earn a weekend night reward when you spend $15,000 in a calendar year and the ability to earn Diamond elite status when you spend $40,000 in a calendar year. Terms apply.

The comes with automatic Diamond elite status, one weekend night reward, a $250 statement credit for purchases at participating Hilton resorts, and a $100 on-property credit for purchases at Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts and Conrad Hotels & Resorts. Terms apply.

If you want status or the ability to book on points, but don’t want to commit to a , consider , which also comes with automatic Hilton Gold Status. Its points can typically be transferred to the Hilton Honors program at a 1:2 ratio. Terms apply.

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is a luxury Hyatt hotel in downtown Dallas with three restaurants, a spa, a fitness center and a rooftop pool.

Cost to book in points: Rooms start at 25,000 points per night at this Category 6 World of Hyatt hotel. NerdWallet values Hyatt points at each.

With more than 1,100 rooms, the Hyatt Regency Dallas is a Category 3 Hyatt property that requires a reasonable number of points to book an award night. As a hotel guest, amenities available to you include two restaurants, a sports bar, an outdoor pool, a sundeck and a gym.

Cost to book in points: As a Category 3 property, rooms start at 12,000 points per night.

The earns 9x points at Hyatt and offers a free night at a Category 1 through 4 property every cardmember year. Separately, Hyatt is a hotel partner. This means that any Chase points that you earn can be transferred directly to Hyatt for bookings.

With two major airports, it’s relatively easy to travel to Dallas-Fort Worth on points and miles. Once you’ve committed to making the trip, Marriott, Hilton and Hyatt offer plentiful hotel options for your stay.

With this guide, planning your Dallas-Fort Worth trip with points and miles should be much easier.

All information about the has been collected independently by NerdWallet. The is no longer available through NerdWallet.

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