Amazon Launches ‘Home Services’

Personal Finance
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Amazon Launches 'Home Services'

Amazon’s come a long way from just selling books. Now, the online retail giant wants to help you find a plumber, mechanic, handyman or herd of goats willing to come to your home.

Amazon Home Services launched Monday.

It’s a marketplace for what the company calls on-demand professional services. Handpicked by Amazon, more than 2 million offers of 700 different services are available at launch, according to a news release.

“With this expansion beyond physical and digital goods, Amazon is now making purchasing professional services as easy as buying products,” the company said in the release.

The service is initially available in a handful of major U.S. cities, including San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles and Seattle. Availability of services in each city is currently ranked from high to light.

Singer, goat grazer, aerial yoga instructor and Christmas-light installer are just a few of the more exotic offerings — though those, like other services, are not available in all cities.

As opposed to a general referral to professionals, Home Services refers customers to specific offers, such as installing a dishwasher, assembling a grill, repairing a smartphone or replacing a car battery.

Each provider offers an upfront price and Amazon offers what it calls a Happiness Guarantee. If a consumer isn’t satisfied, Amazon says it will “work with customers and the pro to ensure the job gets done right or provide a refund.”

To find Home Services from the Amazon home page, customers can click on the “Amazon Home Services” link in the “Shop by Department” navigation, or type terms including “home services” or “local services” into the search bar.

All reviews on the service’s website will be from verified customers, Amazon said, cutting out fakes from the service providers themselves and their friends (or rivals).

Doug Gross is a staff writer covering personal finance for NerdWallet. Follow him on Twitter@doug_gross and on Google+.


Image via iStock.