AmEx Blue Cash Everyday Review: Grocery and Gas Rewards, $0 Annual Fee

You get bonus rewards of 3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 in spending per year, plus 2% back at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores. Terms apply.
Gregory KarpSep 10, 2021

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Our Take

4.3

NerdWallet rating 

The bottom line: If groceries and gas are significant parts of your budget and you refuse to pay an annual fee, this card is a fine choice.

American Express Blue Cash Everyday Credit Card

on American Express's website

Annual fee

$0

Regular APR

13.99% - 23.99% Variable APR

Intro APR

0% intro APR on Purchases for 15 months

Recommended Credit Score

Quick FactsView rates and fees

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • No annual fee
  • High rewards rate
  • Intro APR period
  • Bonus categories

Cons

  • Requires good/excellent credit
  • Spending caps on bonus rewards

Alternate Pick: Higher reward rates

American Express Blue Cash Preferred Credit Card
NerdWallet rating 

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

BIg-time grocery and gas rewards, for a fee

If you spend more than $61 a week on groceries, you'll get more value out of this card, even accounting for the $0 intro for the first year, then $95 annual fee. You get a whopping 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets, on up to $6,000 a year in spending (then 1%); 6% cash back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions; 3% cash back at U.S. gas stations and on transit (including such things as taxis, rideshares, parking, tolls, trains and buses); and 1% cash back on all other purchases. (Terms apply.)

Read our review

Compare to Other Cards

NerdWallet rating 
NerdWallet rating 
NerdWallet rating 
Annual fee

$0

Annual fee

$0

Annual fee

$0

Regular APR

13.99% - 23.99% Variable APR

Rates & Fees

Regular APR

13.99% - 23.99% Variable APR

Regular APR

11.99% - 22.99% Variable APR

Rates & Fees

Intro APR

0% intro APR on Purchases for 15 months

Intro APR

0% intro APR on Balance Transfers for 18 months

Intro APR

0% intro APR for 14 months on purchases and balance transfers

Recommended Credit Score
Recommended Credit Score
Recommended Credit Score

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Full Review

If you rack up spending at the gas pump and grocery checkout, the  could be a good choice among rewards cards.

For a -annual-fee card, it offers an excellent 3% cash-back rate at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 in spending per year, along with a competitive 2% rate at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores. Terms apply.

Nevertheless, the card will frequently be compared with its big brother, the , which is perhaps the ultimate gas and groceries card. It has a relatively high annual fee of , but in exchange it offers elevated bonus-category rewards: an industry-leading 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets, on up to $6,000 a year in spending (then 1%); 6% cash back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions; 3% cash back at U.S. gas stations and on transit (including such things as taxis, rideshares, parking, tolls, trains and buses); and 1% cash back on all other purchases. (Terms apply.)

Overall, the offers good rewards in a few practical spending categories. But the argument to make it your only rewards credit card breaks down when comparing it with its big brother and the best of its . That leaves it mostly as a decent gas and groceries card for lighter spenders and those who refuse to pay an annual fee to boost rewards.

To view rates and fees of the , see .

Card type: .

Annual fee:

Introductory bonus:

Rewards:

Interest rate:

Getting 3% back on your U.S. supermarket spending is a nice return on a potentially big portion of the household budget. It essentially means getting a discount on all the food, paper goods, personal care products and other items you buy regularly at the grocery store. Terms apply.

Rewards are based on where you’re shopping — in this case, U.S. supermarkets — not what you buy there. American Express’ definition of U.S. supermarkets excludes wholesale clubs such as Costco and Sam’s Club, superstores like Target and Wal-Mart, specialty food stores and others. So consider not only how much you spend on groceries but also where you most often buy them.

The 3% rewards rate applies to the first $6,000 in U.S. supermarket spending annually. That’s generous for a rewards spending cap. Maxed out, it’s worth $180 annually in cash back. But it’s still a cap — one a family could blow through before the year is done. The average U.S. household of four spends about $6,200 on food at home annually and hundreds more on housekeeping supplies and personal care products that are also common purchases in supermarkets, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' most recent Consumer Expenditure Survey. So a family of four could exceed its limit for 3% rewards and then revert to 1% cash back. Terms apply.

A 2% cash-back rate at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores is double the mundane 1% that many cards offer, although it's not as unique as it was just a few years ago. The nice part is that those double rewards aren't capped. Terms apply.

However, restrictions apply here, too:

The comes with a bonus offer for new cardholders: That’s a nice incentive.

» MORE:

A primary consideration with the card is deciding whether you should instead apply for its big brother. The pays 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets, on up to $6,000 a year in spending (then 1%); 6% cash back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions; 3% cash back at U.S. gas stations and on transit (including such things as taxis, rideshares, parking, tolls, trains and buses); and 1% cash back on all other purchases. Terms apply (see ). But it comes at a price. The annual fee is — steep for a cash-back card.

When is the annual-fee card a better deal? An easy comparison is to look at supermarket spending only. If you spend at least $61 per week at U.S. supermarkets, you’ll earn more with the , even after the annual fee. Our  goes into more detail and includes a calculator for comparing rewards.

If you don’t spend enough on groceries or some combination of other bonus categories to justify the big-brother card, the best alternative isn’t necessarily a step down to the . Instead, a flat-rate card that pays rewards on all spending might be a better fit.

For example, a no-fee alternative is the low-hassle , which pays 2% cash back on all purchases: 1% when you buy something and another 1% when you pay it off. No spending categories to remember.

Or consider the generous 5% rotating bonus rewards categories of the and , which have in the past included grocery stores and gas stations. The 5% cash back rewards on these cards apply up to a $1,500 quarterly spending maximum and you have to activate the categories each quarter. All other purchases on the cards get 1% back. If you prefer to have reward rates on the categories flipped, the  offers 3% cash back on the spending category of your choice, which includes gas as an option, and 2% on groceries. (With these cards, the amount of spending eligible for bonus rewards is capped; click through to their pages for details.)

The card is not ideal to use abroad because acceptance internationally lags Visa and Mastercard, and it charges a 2.7% fee on international purchases. Some cards .

You can learn more about cash-back credit card alternatives by visiting NerdWallet's list of the .

The offers good, relevant cash-back rewards that could match your needs if you spend modest amounts at U.S. supermarkets, U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores — modest enough not to justify applying for the . Before you decide, check out flat-rate and quarterly category , which might match your spending better and pay slightly higher dividends.

To view rates and fees of the , see . To view rates and fees of the , see .

Frequently asked questions