The American Express Blue Cash Preferred: Blue is Best - NerdWallet
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The American Express Blue Cash Preferred: Blue is Best

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Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express Editor's Rating: 4.4 / 5

NerdWallet
If you’re looking for unparalleled rewards for your everyday purchases, look no further than Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express. You earn top-notch rewards on gas and department stores, plus an unparalleled 6% rewards at grocery stores, up to $6,000 spent annually (then 1%). And since it pays out in cash, you don’t have to contend with gimmicky rewards programs or unwieldy airline miles. So if you eat food, wear clothing and drive cars — which, I venture to say, is a good portion of us — the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express has some of the best rewards out there.

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

Apply Now on American Express's secure website

Pros

  • Leading cash back rewards for groceries
  • Sign-up bonus
  • 0% APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Cons

  • Has annual fee - but if you spend more than $27/week the rewards offset the fees
  • American Express isn’t accepted at as many merchants as Visa or MasterCard

Bonus Offer

Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.

Annual Fee

$75

Intro APR Promotions

0% on Purchases for 15 months and 0% on Balance Transfers for 15 months

APR

  • APR: 13.24%-22.24% Variable
  • Penalty APR: Up to 29.49%, Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.49%, Variable

Card Details

  • Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.
  • Earn Cash Back: 6% U.S. supermarkets up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 3% U.S. gas stations & select U.S. dept stores, 1% other purchases. Terms and limitations apply.
  • With the Blue Cash Preferred® Card, you can start earning cash back. No rotating reward categories. No enrollment required.
  • Cash back is received in the form of Reward Dollars that can be redeemed as a statement credit. Cash back is earned only on eligible purchases.
  • 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, then a variable rate, currently 13.24% to 22.24%, based on your creditworthiness and other factors.
  • Terms and limitations apply.
  • View Rates and Fees

At a glance
Annual fees $75
Foreign transaction fee 2.7%
Rewards program Cash back
Signup bonus Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.
Verdict: If you spend money on gas and groceries, this is the card for you.
Good for:
  • Someone who spends a lot on gas or groceries
  • Someone who spends money at places that sell gift cards at grocery stores (we’ll explain later)
  • Someone looking for a solid cash back credit card
Bad for:
  • Someone who spends less than $50 a week on groceries
  • Someone who travels often

In this article:

The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express basics
Bluebloods: Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express vs. other cash back credit cards
Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express vs. Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express
Where the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express shines
Where it falls short
What is a standalone grocery store anyway?

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express Basics

This is pretty much one of the best credit cards out there for gas and grocery spending, and the rewards rate is unparalleled. It gives a full 6% rewards at grocery stores up to $6,000 spent annually (then 1%), plus an unlimited 3% on gas and department stores and 1% elsewhere. The 6% rewards is pretty much the best we’ve seen anywhere on any bonus category.

The card’s 6% rewards at grocery stores opens up an opportunity for a neat trick: you can purchase gift cards for Starbucks, Exxon, the Gap, whatever, at the checkout line, thus securing 6% rewards on virtually anywhere you spend — just keep in mind the $6,000 annual cap.

Don’t be deterred by the $75 annual fee — spend just $25 a week on groceries and you’ve made up for the fee, not to mention the signup bonus. If you’re anti-annual fee, the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express is a $0-annual-fee, lesser-rewards version of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express. This card gives 3% rewards on groceries, also up to $6,000 annually (then 1%), plus 2% on gas and department stores and 1% elsewhere. You can read more about the tradeoff between the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express and Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express here.

Sound too good to be true? Nope, it’s real … but there are a few caveats.

First off, there’s the $6,000 a year cap on groceries. Spending past the $6,000 threshold earns just 1% cash back — an unlimited 6% cash back is indeed just too good to be true. Another letdown of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express is simply that: its name. Unfortunately, Amex isn’t as widely accepted as other credit card networks, so we recommend having a no-fee Visa or MasterCard as a backup. Also, world travelers be warned: there’s a 2.7% foreign transaction fee. If you frequently travel abroad, check out these cards with no foreign transaction fee.

Bluebloods: Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express vs.  Chase Freedom®

Time for the big leagues: How do the Blue Cash cards stack up the cash-back contender?

Chase Freedom®

Apply Now on Chase's secure website

Pros

  • Bonus 5% cash back categories
  • No annual fee
  • 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers
  • Qualify with Good credit

Cons

  • If you value simplicity, a flat rate cash back card may be better

Bonus Offer

Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening

Annual Fee

$0

Intro APR Promotions

0% for 15 Months on purchases and 0% Intro APR for 15 months on balance transfers

APR

  • APR: 14.24-23.24% Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.24%, Variable

Card Details

  • Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening
  • Earn a $25 Bonus after you add your first authorized user and make a purchase within this same 3-month period
  • 0% Intro APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers. After the intro period, a variable APR of 14.24-23.24%
  • Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate
  • Enjoy new 5% categories every 3 months like gas stations, restaurants, and select grocery stores
  • Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases - it's automatic
  • Cash Back rewards never expire as long as your account is open
  • No annual fee

The Chase Freedom® offers 5% cash back in bonus categories that change every quarter and can range from gas and drugstores to Amazon.com and Macy’s. It has an annual fee of $0 and comes with a signup bonus: Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening. It comes with a cap: bonus rewards are limited to the first $1,500 spent every quarter. Basically, if a hefty chunk of your money goes to groceries, go blue; if not, go with a bit more variety.

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express vs. Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

Apply Now on American Express's secure website

Pros

  • No annual fee
  • 0% on Purchases for 15 months and 0% on Balance Transfers for 15 months

Cons

  • Needs excellent credit

Bonus Offer

Get $100 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $100 back in the form of a statement credit.

Annual Fee

$0

Intro APR Promotions

0% on Purchases for 15 months and 0% on Balance Transfers for 15 months

APR

  • APR: 13.24%-22.24% Variable
  • Penalty APR: Up to 29.49%, Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.49%, Variable

Card Details

  • Get $100 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $100 back in the form of a statement credit.
  • Earn Cash Back: 3% U.S. supermarkets up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 2% U.S. gas stations & select U.S. dept stores, 1% other purchases. Terms and limitations apply.
  • With the Blue Cash Everyday® Card, you can start earning cash back. No rotating reward categories. No enrollment required.
  • Cash back is received in the form of Reward Dollars that can be redeemed as a statement credit. Cash back is earned only on eligible purchases.
  • No annual fee. Plus, 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, then a variable rate, currently 13.24% to 22.24%, based on your creditworthiness and other factors.
  • Terms and restrictions apply.
  • View Rates and Fees

How do you know whether to get the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express or the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express? It’s pretty simple. Looking only at grocery rewards, you should get the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express if you spend at least $50 a week on groceries (or gift cards at grocery stores). At that spending level, the extra 3% in grocery rewards outweighs the annual fee. If you can’t meet that threshold, go with the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express.

Where the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express shines

The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express is at its best when used by households – people who spend the bulk of their money on feeding the family and shuttling the kids around. If you’re spending $50+ a week on groceries, or if you’re filling up your tank often, this is the ideal card for you.

Where it falls short

As we mentioned above, if you spend less than $50 a week on groceries, you’re better off with the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express. Another case where the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express isn’t ideal is if you travel often, particularly if you travel internationally. Frequent travelers might want to forgo cash back for potentially more valuable travel points, or aim for a card that gives bonus rewards on travel spending. The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express carries a 2.7% foreign transaction fee, and American Express’ international acceptance lags behind Visa and MasterCard’s. You can check out our list of the best travel credit cards to find an ideal card.

What is a standalone grocery store anyway?

The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express earns 6% rewards at stand-alone grocery stores, and the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express earns 3%, up to the first $6,000 spent per year (then 1%). But what counts at a grocery store? Generally speaking, if the main product is food, you’re in the clear — this means Safeway, Whole Foods and Stop & Shop. This does not include superstores and warehouse clubs (such as Costco, Walmart and Target). Amex Canada’s site can give some color into what consitutes a grocery store:

Purchases at merchants where [grocery] sales are not their primary business (including superstores, wholesale clubs, alcohol retailers and general merchandise retailers) and purchases at sponsors do not qualify for the earn rate in this category.

Per the Blue Cash’s website, though, we can see what Amex considers to be department stores:

Bealls, Belk, Bloomingdale’s, Bon Ton Stores., Boscov’s, Century 21 Department Stores, Dillard’s, J.C. Penney, Kohl’s, Lord & Taylor, Macy’s, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Avenue, Sears, and Stein Mart

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  • GSW

    Just found on my statement that they are limiting 6% groceries to first $6,000 dollars. They hook you and then sink you. Still a good deal I think – will have to analyze other offerings. I hate that the credit agencies downgrade credit rating if you close an account.

  • Parnab Ghosh

    How to avoid processing fees on gift card purchases from groceries store? If there is a fee how AMEX blue cash would be rewarding by purchasing giftcards?

  • suzie guzzlenuts

    i have 9 dollars on this crap. how do i get more money

  • jesse

    this information is flawed. Amex does not pay 6% on grocery but only on selected super stores which they dont tell you. very biased review.

  • jesse

    this information is flawed. Amex does not pay 6% on grocery but only on selected super stores which they dont tell you. very biased review.

  • Senthil Vijayaragavan

    Checked my recent purchases – Wegmans, Whole Foods DOES NOT qualify for the 6% supermarket rate. They earn just 1%.

  • Volatile7

    I signed up for this expecting to get the free prime and 100$ if you spend 1000$ in the first 3 months. They are saying that wasn’t the deal i signed up for. When clearly it is advertised, to this day, on their page. Has anybody else had this problem? I only see one other person that commented about it. I fell like ive been scammed. How does that even happen? I’m a new blue preferred member.

  • retired_sandman

    I have had this card since 2002. I have used it less
    these days because the interest rate is non-comptetitive, but still use
    it rarely for international travel. I had a 0 balance in February
    2014. Without warning, their wallet protector service auto-billed to it
    in March 2014 ($39.99). This was the only charge that billing cycle. I
    did not check the statement since I had not used the card. There was
    no warning of the impending charge. In April 2014, American Express
    tacked on a $25 late fee (total balance now $64.99 and jacked up my rate
    to the penalty rate of 27% for this. They refused to remit the late
    fee or penalty rate. Inasmuch as the only balance on the card was
    initiated by american express itself and it was done without warning, I
    feel the practice is predatory. I have filed a complaint with the
    government’s CFPB, as it seems this was the sort of practice they were
    created for.

    I would advise extreme caution with these jerks as this is the way they treat a customer of a dozen or more years.

  • retired_sandman

    I have had this card since 2002. I have used it less
    these days because the interest rate is non-comptetitive, but still use
    it rarely for international travel. I had a 0 balance in February
    2014. Without warning, their wallet protector service auto-billed to it
    in March 2014 ($39.99). This was the only charge that billing cycle. I
    did not check the statement since I had not used the card. There was
    no warning of the impending charge. In April 2014, American Express
    tacked on a $25 late fee (total balance now $64.99 and jacked up my rate
    to the penalty rate of 27% for this. They refused to remit the late
    fee or penalty rate. Inasmuch as the only balance on the card was
    initiated by american express itself and it was done without warning, I
    feel the practice is predatory. I have filed a complaint with the
    government’s CFPB, as it seems this was the sort of practice they were
    created for.

    I would advise extreme caution with these jerks as this is the way they treat a customer of a dozen or more years.

  • retired_sandman

    I have had this card since 2002. I have used it less
    these days because the interest rate is non-comptetitive, but still use
    it rarely for international travel. I had a 0 balance in February
    2014. Without warning, their wallet protector service auto-billed to it
    in March 2014 ($39.99). This was the only charge that billing cycle. I
    did not check the statement since I had not used the card. There was
    no warning of the impending charge. In April 2014, American Express
    tacked on a $25 late fee (total balance now $64.99 and jacked up my rate
    to the penalty rate of 27% for this. They refused to remit the late
    fee or penalty rate. Inasmuch as the only balance on the card was
    initiated by american express itself and it was done without warning, I
    feel the practice is predatory. I have filed a complaint with the
    government’s CFPB, as it seems this was the sort of practice they were
    created for.

    I would advise extreme caution with these jerks as this is the way they treat a customer of a dozen or more years.

  • TheLight

    I just signed up for this card and will be putting all of my grocery and gas purchases on it. For those who are complaining below that the interest rate for carrying a balance isn’t competitive, where do you think the money to pay your big cashback rewards comes from? The best way to use these cards is to be a freeloader. Pay your balance in full every month and collect the rewards without ever paying a nickel in interest.

  • ALR Minneapolis

    Since 2011, I’ve earned and redeemed $2500 in cash back from this card. We use it for everything we can and pay in full each month.

    • Guest

      This card is good for getting the $360/yr out of grocery stores and for 3% on gas(figure a super heavy driving family spends $400/mo on gas?) so potentially another $144 there. That’s $504/yr minus a $75/yr annual fee. If you just spent the same on a purchases with flat 2% cards(like Arrival or Venture), you’d end up with $264. Never mind just having one card is more convenient and less confusing, the 2%-2.2% minimum on everything else blows away this card. If you get an Amex card, get it for the service perks like extended warranties and purchase protection. It’s stellar compared to the Visa/Mastercard equivalents.

  • ALR Minneapolis

    Since 2011, I’ve earned and redeemed $2500 in cash back from this card. We use it for everything we can and pay in full each month.

  • Parkerthon

    This card is good for getting the $360/yr out of grocery stores and for 3% on gas(figure a super heavy driving family spends $400/mo on gas?) so potentially another $144 there. That’s $504/yr minus a $75/yr annual fee. If you just spent the same on a purchases with flat 2% cards(like Arrival or Venture), you’d end up with $264. Never mind just having one card is more convenient and less confusing, the 2%-2.2% minimum on everything else blows away this card. If you get an Amex card, get it for the service perks like extended warranties and purchase protection. It’s stellar compared to the Visa/Mastercard equivalents

  • Parkerthon

    This card is good for getting the $360/yr out of grocery stores and for 3% on gas(figure a super heavy driving family spends $400/mo on gas?) so potentially another $144 there. That’s $504/yr minus a $75/yr annual fee. If you just spent the same on a purchases with flat 2% cards(like Arrival or Venture), you’d end up with $264. Never mind just having one card is more convenient and less confusing, the 2%-2.2% minimum on everything else blows away this card. If you get an Amex card, get it for the service perks like extended warranties and purchase protection. It’s stellar compared to the Visa/Mastercard equivalents

  • Wesley Pipes

    I already have the preferred card. Am I allowed obtain the everyday as well?

  • KT Watkins

    The best part of this card isn’t just the 6% and the 3% on gas – it’s the rewards you get in addition.
    For example, I got an offer for $20 amazon if I spend $20 or more..spent $40 on items I would have bought anyway and got $20 off. Got $10 off on a favorite restaurant and $50 off a favorite department store. That’s 110 in a 3 week period more than offsetting the annual fee.

  • LRS

    I have had this card for a year and am planning to cancel it. Most of the places I grocery shop and buy gas do not “qualify” for the full reward value for these categories. Most gas stations have quick marts and at least for me I have found that I don’t get 3% at these locations where I live. If you buy a lot of gas and groceries at locations that qualify – this is a great card. Most of my purchases only qualified for the 1% so not worth it for me – I am switching to the fidelity rewards card because we already have a fidelity account, we have varied buying habits, there is no annual fee, and it is a straight 2% for all purchases. Like anything else, you must choose what works for you, but I must say I am frustrated that so many stores don’t qualify under this card because so many chains are now superstores/minimarts.

  • Roberta1962

    We have the old blue AMEX and I have a MC, that gets, I think 1.25% back all purchases. I just did some math on an online purch. and used MC instead. We always get past the $6500? or whatever it is today, but it is not as good for any purch. It would be good to have that 2% one referenced below also, IMO.

  • DannyGGG

    Would a food coop qualify for 6%, or only big chain stores?

  • Astyanax

    Is the 6% AMEX grocery card coming back?

  • Mac

    Like many of the other commenters here American Express drastically reduced my credit limit on this card without reason or warning. I had a credit limit on this card of $13,000 and used it as my primary card because I appreciated the awards that it gave. I have never missed or been late on a payment on this or any other card or line of credit in my life and my FICO score is in the high 700’s.

    Without any warning American Express cut my credit limit to $1,0000 – a reduction of $12,000. They notified me by snail mail and in the time it took me to receive the letter I had maxed out the card (which is bad for your credit). When asking about the credit line decrease they send you to a call center in India, it took literally hours to reach a supervisor. The guy that I finally reached was among the rudest person I have ever had the displeasure of speaking to, but he finally told me that AmEx reserves the right to cut credit lines without any reason and at their own discretion.

    My suspicion is that they cut my credit line simply because I always paid in full and on time and they weren’t making any money from me paying interest. If you care about your credit history avoid American Express like the plague.

  • Sharon K

    When does the “cardmember year” roll over? I hit the $6K cap and want to know when it resets for the next year. My card was originally approved back in Nov 2013, but as of Dec 7, 2014, I still haven’t been charged the AF. Does that mean my new year hasn’t started yet?

  • http://www.retorch.com/ Jason Beck

    So I signed up a few months ago, and I just got the $150 bonus. It’s listed as “doing business as…” and it’s my nearby Wegmans. The category is “MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES – GROCERIES.” Is there any chance that they’ll actually use that to reduce how much I’ve “spent” on groceries and reduce my reward dollars by 6% * $150 = $9?

  • Steve Linn

    I use this for the 6% cash back at a value of $360/yr on grocery stores and for 3% at my local gas station. As soon as I max out the 6% cash back at the grocery store, I buy gift cards to the grocery store at the gas station using my 3% cash back. No need to have both the Blue Cash Everyday card to accompany the Preferred card with some planning. I then have the Citi Double Cash card with 1% cash back at purchase and 1% cash at time of credit card payment for a 2% cash back at all places that I cannot buy a gift card for at the gas station and/or grocery store.

    • Dean Rod

      I believe gift cards are technically excluded from the 3% gas station offer and for sure from the 6% grocery store offer. Have you successfully gotten the 3% back for the gift cards you’ve purchased at gas stations? If so, that’s a pretty good trick.

  • Steve Linn

    I use this for the 6% cash back at a value of $360/yr on grocery stores and for 3% at my local gas station. As soon as I max out the 6% cash back at the grocery store, I buy gift cards to the grocery store at the gas station using my 3% cash back. No need to have both the Blue Cash Everyday card to accompany the Preferred card with some planning. I then have the Citi Double Cash card with 1% cash back at purchase and 1% cash at time of credit card payment for a 2% cash back at all places that I cannot buy a gift card for at the gas station and/or grocery store.

  • Spunky

    Can this card be used for gift cards like this?
    My local grocery store sells gift cards for their own store in bulk. For example, if I were to purchase $5,000 worth of Grocery Store gift cards I could save 5%. My thinking is I could combine the savings by using this card and the bulk gift card discount. Will this work? If so, when one considers the zero% introductory rate, this seems like a no-brainer.

  • paul r

    If you do the math and look at your annual spending on groceries and gas, the 6% and the 3% should more than make up for it. If you only spend $5000 in groceries in the last year, that’s $300-$75=$225 versus $150 for the 3%. The 6% already makes up for it without the $6000 cap or including gas and misc purchases.

  • http://www.facebook.com/aprilmascara April

    I have $600 available to either use as a statement credit or purchase gift cards w/my Amex Blue card. Should I choose the statement credit or use to purchase gift cards? If I were to purchase gift cards – which GC’s have the best deal if any at this time?

    I would appreciate any feedback on what is the best way where I get the most for my money option that I should choose.

    • Michael

      I would choose the statement credit. it is a money back (because you will not be using your own money to pay the statement). The gift card will force you to use these gift cards even if you later changed your mind or suddenly decided that you are no longer like this merchant product. The way I see it: “would you rather take $10 in cash or $10 in Starbucks gift card?” I always choose “show me the cash, and i can decide what I need later”

  • Dean Rod

    I am an American Express Blue Cash Preferred card member and you CANNOT…I repeat CANNOT, use this card to receive 6% cash back when you purchase gift cards in grocery stores. It is expressively forbidden in the cardmember agreement and I phoned Amex customer service recently to confirm this after reading the incorrect information in the article above. The agent I spoke with made it clear that gift cards are coded differently and are immediately identified in the billing process. I can’t remember if they qualify for even the 1% “everything else” cash back rate, or are excluded because of their “cash-like” nature.

    Nevertheless, it’s a GREAT card. If you charge $1,000 in the first 3 months (which we did easily) you will earn $150 cash back which will cover 2 years of the $75 annual fee. My wife and I pretty much just use it for groceries and gas. We also recently received the Citi Double Cash Mastercard that we’re using for most other stuff with a 2% cash back rate. (1% when you make a purchase and another 1% when you pay.)

    • Kevin

      It’s not surprising….it’s not like they WANT you purchase GCs and do that for the 6%. It’s intended for actual grocery spend. And they have certainly shut people down who violate this.

      But yes – for actual reasonably high grocery spend, it’s a great card

    • duketg

      I’m just curious here — how do they know? If you buy a load of groceries and get a gift card at the same time, I don’t see how AMEX would have any idea.

      • Dean Rod

        I’m not sure. I haven’t tried it yet. I might try it as an experiment.

  • Dean Rod

    This review sounds fake. The representatives I’ve spoken with in India (3 so far) have been the most polite group of people I’ve dealt with in decades over a telephone. They were positively gushing with good vibes, positivity and appreciation for my patronage.

    Why would Amex want to scr*w you over for paying your balance in full when the card has a 0% interest rate for the first 15 months? They also make a transaction fee from the vendor every time you make a purchase, so they’re making money on your card activity anyway without needing your interest too.

    I can only assume that you left a major part of your story out, or made the whole thing up.

    • Mac

      Nope, 100% true. In fact I had the Costco Amex at the same time as this card and was given an unsolicited credit line increase days after this incident. Annex contracts out with a third-party for any kind of a credit line dispute. It is literally impossible to talk to an Amex employee for any credit line decrease issues. If you haven’t had this problem happened to you and you haven’t talked to the department that I’m talking about in my review. However if you look at all the reviews here I think you’ll find that this is not an uncommon occurrence and that American Express seriously need to consider and how it treats its customers when they make a mistake like this.

  • Kevin

    Your math is kind of incorrect here, nerdwallet. If you spend $25 a week on groceries (just that alone, not counting other spend), you will net $78 in rewards at the end of the year. Take the fee out and you made a measly 3 bucks.

    The BCE would make more sense with that spend level as you’d net 39.

    The calculation needs to be how much it takes to EARN more than the BCE. Not just to pay for the AF. We’re talking about net rewards here, right? Nobody should be mislead – the BCP takes a good amount of spend to justify. A single person probably doesn’t spend enough for it for example (though obviously there are exceptions).

  • JoeC

    Isn’t paying for gas with a credit card costlier than paying with cash?

    • Kevin

      Can be in some cases which negates “rewards”. Some people get so caught up in “rewards” they are forgetting common sense. It also cracks me up because you are paying 10-20% more for groceries at the grocery store vs getting them at Walmart or Target (who typically don’t count as grocery for the purpose of rewards). However, spending more to get 6% vs getting the groceries cheaper to begin with makes little sense.

      • LG71

        I don’t think it’s true. Prices in Target most of the time are more than in grocery stores here in MN and quality is not even close.

        • Kevin

          Obviously it does depend on which products you are buying as not everything is cheaper at Target, but plenty of stuff is, especially snack foods and the like, so buying those at grocery store to get 6% may not be the best deal between the two but YMMV