Advertiser Disclosure

Contributed Too Much to Your 401(k)? Here’s What to Do

To avoid being taxed twice, notify your plan administrator and have excess contributions removed before April 15, two days ahead of this year's tax-filing deadline.
March 12, 2018
401(k), Investing, Personal Finance
Contributed too Much to Your 401(K)? Here's What to Do-story
NerdWallet adheres to strict standards of editorial integrity to help you make decisions with confidence. Some of the products we feature are from partners. Here’s how we make money.
We adhere to strict standards of editorial integrity. Some of the products we feature are from our partners. Here’s how we make money.

If you’ve discovered you overcontributed to your employer-sponsored 401(k) plan in 2017 — first of all, congrats on maxing out tax-free contributions to your retirement savings. That habit will pay off down the line.

But the clock is ticking to notify your plan administrator and correct the problem before April 15, which is two days ahead of this year’s April 17 filing deadline. If you don’t act, the worst-case scenario is that you may be taxed twice on the amount above the 2017 individual contribution limit of $18,000 (or $24,000 if you are 50 or older).

“Who wants to pay taxes on any amount twice, right?” says Denise Appleby of Appleby Retirement Consulting, an Atlanta firm that helps companies administer employer retirement plans.

Here’s what you should do to correct the problem, and how to avoid in the future.

Here’s what to do before filing your taxes

Contact your employer or plan administrator. Some lingo can be helpful here: Tell your plan administrator you’ve made an “excess deferral.” For example, if in 2017 you contributed $19,000 to your 401(k), you need to be paid back $1,000 in excess deferral. That amount needs to be paid to you before April 15.

The plan administrator is required to return the excess funds to you — as a “corrective distribution” — plus calculate and return additional earnings (if any) and reissue paperwork that corrects the overcontribution. “That takes time, and sometimes companies can move slowly doing this,” Appleby says.

Correcting an excess contribution takes time, and companies can move slowly doing this.

Denise Appleby, Appleby Retirement Consulting

Get a new W-2 and pay taxes. The returned excess contribution will be added to your total taxable wages for the previous year, so an amended 2017 W-2 will be issued. Your tax bill will rise (or your refund will shrink) relative to the amount of the excess 401(k) contribution.

Handling excess earnings. Any income earned from the excess contribution will count on your tax bill for 2018 (which is due in April 2019). You’ll receive a Form 1099-R at the end of the tax year in which the earnings were paid back to you.

Two important notes

Don’t be confused by the jump in contribution limits. The IRS recently increased 401(k) contribution limits by $500 to $18,500 for the 2018 tax year. But that change is for taxes you’ll file in 2019. For the 2017 tax year, the $18,000 contribution limit still stands.

This isn’t about your employer’s matching contributions. This scenario addresses only the limit on the pretax wages you contributed to the plan. You should always try to contribute as much as possible to get full matching funds from your employer, but just make sure your contributions don’t exceed the limit.

Dealing with excess 401(k) contributions after Tax Day

The bad news. You’ll end up paying taxes twice on the amount over the $18,000 limit if the overcontribution isn’t paid back to you by April 15.

You’ll be taxed first in the year you overcontributed, and again in the year the correction occurs, Appleby says.

Common reasons for excess 401(k) contributions

Here are some scenarios in which excess contributions are more likely to happen:

  • You switched employers and retirement plans during the tax year. “This is probably the most common reason,” Appleby says. “And you’ve given too much to each plan.” Make sure your new provider is aware of the year-to-date balance of your contributions to your old retirement plan. And consider rolling over 401(k) accounts from previous employers into your new plan or an individual retirement account.
  • You have two jobs with two retirement plans. “There are so many people now who are working two jobs,” Appleby says. It’s important to remember that contributions to separate retirement plans like a 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans can’t collectively be higher than the $18,000 limit. “Plan participants often don’t realize the $18,000 limit is on a per individual basis, not a per plan basis,” Appleby says. “And as a result they contribute the maximum amount to each plan.”

    Plan participants often don’t realize the contribution limit is on a per individual basis, not a per plan basis.

    Denise Appleby, Appleby Retirement Consulting
  • You got a raise or bonuses during the tax year. Lots of people set and forget their automatic contribution levels as a percentage of their income to get the full matching dollars from their employer. That’s smart. That’s free money.

But, say, your smarts also led to a promotion with a salary bump or bonus. That’s where the problem can occur, Appleby says.

“You might say, I’m making a salary contribution of 10% — take 10% out of my paycheck every month,” she says. “And then you get this big fat raise in the middle of the year. That causes this 10% to be more as well.”

Saving as much as you can toward retirement is, of course, a good idea. Crossing the line into excess contributions may be a pain, but any penalty will be slight compared with the long-term benefits of retirement savings.

About the author