Compare Mortgages

Select an option below to compare rates, fees and features

  • Compare the whole market

  • Answer just 8 simple questions to start

  • See how your current or preferred lender compares

  • Apply directly with your chosen lender or through our broker partner

Think carefully about securing debt against your home. Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage

Information written by Tim Leonard Last updated on 25 November 2021.

How to choose a mortgage

Getting the right mortgage deal is important. After all, it’s a long-term financial commitment and monthly expense you’ll need to keep up for years to come. But where do you begin?

The first step is to work out the type of mortgage you need, something which will depend on why you are looking for a mortgage. Usually you’ll fall into one of the following categories:

First-time buyer

If you’ve never owned a home before, a first-time buyer mortgage is usually what you’ll need. Knowing that you’re just starting out, the deposit requirements on most first-time buyer mortgages are generally small and options where upfront fees are kept to a minimum are usually available.

» COMPARE: First-time buyer mortgages

Remortgaging

If you already have a mortgage but want to switch to a new one, you are looking to remortgage. Most people remortgage because their current fixed-rate or discounted term is at an end and they don’t want to move on to their lender’s standard variable rate, which is usually higher. Other reasons you might want to remortgage include to raise funds to pay for home improvements, or because falling interest rates or a rise in the value of your home means you could save money by switching to a new mortgage deal.

» COMPARE: Remortgages

Moving home

If you already have a mortgage but want to move home, you may be able to take your current mortgage with you – called porting – or you might want to arrange a new mortgage altogether, either with your current lender or a new one. Whichever option you’re considering, you should always weigh up the costs of either porting or exiting your existing deal, along with the potential fees you face if you arrange a brand new mortgage.

» COMPARE: Home move mortgages

Buy-to-let mortgages

If you’re considering buying a property to rent out to tenants, you will need a buy-to-let mortgage. Also sometimes known as landlord mortgages, the minimum deposit on a buy-to-let mortgage is typically higher than on a residential mortgage. You’ll need to show that the rental income you’re likely to receive will more than cover your monthly repayments too.

» COMPARE: Buy-to-let mortgages

Once you know which category you fall into, the next step to choosing a mortgage is using our mortgage comparison tool, where you can see how different mortgage rates, fees, and terms from leading lenders affect your monthly repayment.

How to compare mortgages with NerdWallet

Our mortgage comparison tool is the quickest and simplest way to find the best mortgage rates on a home loan to suit you. Answer a few quick questions relating to your situation and the mortgage that you want, and the tool – which offers a whole-of-market comparison – will deliver results tailored exactly to your needs.

What to know about mortgage rates

Mortgage rates are the rate of interest the lender charges on your mortgage balance, which affects how much you pay each month. A lower interest rate can mean lower monthly payments. These rates can be fixed or variable during the agreed mortgage term.

  • Fixed-rate mortgages have a fixed interest rate for a set period of time, so your monthly payments and interest rate will stay the same. When that initial term ends, the interest rate usually moves to the lender’s standard variable rate.

  • Variable rate mortgages, on the other hand, come with an interest rate that can rise and fall, usually in line with the Bank of England base interest rate. Tracker mortgages are variable rate mortgages that follow at a certain percentage above the base rate.

To choose between a fixed rate and a variable rate, ask yourself:

  • Do I want to know exactly what my mortgage will cost each month?
  • Do I mind if my repayments increase and decrease without warning?
  • Do I want to take advantage of potential drops in the base interest rate?
  • Am I willing to remortgage after my fixed-rate period expires?

Why loan-to-value ratio matters

The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is how much you borrow against the property’s total price, after your deposit amount is deducted.

So, say you want to buy a home worth £200,000 and have a 10% deposit of £20,000. It’s no good applying for a mortgage that only offers a maximum 70% loan to value, requiring a 30% deposit. Instead, you’ll need to find a lender who will offer you a 90% LTV.

The LTV can also affect the interest rate you’re charged. You’ll usually get better rates from lenders if you have a lower LTV.

Interest-only vs repayment mortgages

A mortgage has two parts: capital, which is the amount of money you borrow, and interest, which is what the lender charges on the amount you owe.

With interest-only mortgages, your monthly repayment covers just the interest that you owe on the debt, not the amount borrowed. So you’ll still owe the full amount borrowed at the end of the mortgage term, as you’re not paying back any of the capital borrowed over time. Interest-only residential mortgages have fewer options than repayment mortgages. Also, you may not be able to borrow as much and will need to demonstrate how you will repay the capital at the end of the term.

With a repayment mortgage, you gradually repay all the money you borrowed, over your chosen mortgage term, plus interest. Your mortgage balance will get smaller every month and at the end of the agreed term, there will be no outstanding debt if you’ve met the payments. It’s the most common option.

Factor in mortgage fees

When you compare mortgages, it’s important to consider any fees the lender charges for arranging the mortgage, or if you choose to make overpayments. You should also keep an eye out for other potential costs, such as penalties for late or missed payments. And if you want to repay the entire loan early, the penalty is usually a percentage of the outstanding mortgage while the loan is in its initial deal period.

The annual percentage rate of charge (APRC) takes into account the initial rate, additional fees and charges, such as valuation fees, and the follow-on, standard variable charge rate. Our comparison tool results show the APRC as well as the initial rate, so you can see how affordable deals are, relative to each other.

Can I get a mortgage?

Mortgage lenders have rules about who they’ll lend to. They’ll have a minimum age for applying, usually 18, and 21 for a buy-to-let mortgage, and a maximum age you can be when your mortgage term is due to end, which varies from lender to lender.

You'll usually need to have been a UK resident for at least three years and have the right to live and work in the UK.

Lenders will check your finances, so they are confident you can afford the repayments. So they’ll look at documents, such as your payslips to verify how much you earn and bank statements to see how much you spend each month, and they’ll ask about any debts you’re paying off such as car finance loans. They’ll also look at your credit record. Lenders want to be sure you’ll be able to afford your mortgage now and in the future.

Work out how much mortgage you can afford

You’ll get a good idea of how much mortgage you can genuinely afford to pay each month, and how much you would be comfortable spending on the property by taking a close look at your bank statements. What is your income – and your partner’s, if it’s a joint mortgage – and what are your regular outgoings? What can you cut back on and what are non-negotiable expenses? And consider how much you would be able to put down as a house deposit.

Consider how much you should borrow

While it may be possible to borrow as much as four or five times your salary, lenders will look closely at your personal finances before they come to a decision.

As well as your income, they will look at your other earnings, such as investments, and run a credit check to see your repayment history and credit score to evaluate how much to lend you, taking your house deposit into consideration. The higher your deposit, the more favourable the interest rates become because you’ll need to borrow less as a percentage of the total property price, which makes your loan less of a risk to the lender.

Lenders also look at your debt-to-income ratio, which compares your monthly income to your monthly debt repayments as a measure of affordability. If your outgoings are too high each month relative to your monthly pay, a lender likely won’t approve you for a mortgage.

Knowing how much you can afford can be more important than what you can borrow. You should be left with some disposable income and breathing space in case interest rates rise.

» MORE: How much can I borrow on a mortgage?

How to calculate your mortgage

A quick and simple way to get a ballpark figure is to use NerdWallet’s free mortgage calculator. Just adjust your loan amount, interest rate and repayment term, and you’ll see what the monthly repayment would be.

You can also calculate what might happen to your mortgage repayments when interest rates rise and fall, and how much money you might save if you make regular overpayments.

How to apply for a mortgage

You can apply for a mortgage with a bank or building society. You can apply directly with the lender, telling them which mortgage you’re interested in, or through a mortgage broker. You’ll need to provide identification documents and a proof of address, which might be your passport, driving licence or utility bills.

Lenders will also want to see proof of income and evidence of where your deposit is coming from, including recent bank statements and payslips. It will save time if you have these documents ready before you apply.

Mortgage FAQs

What is a mortgage?

A mortgage is a loan you take out to help you buy a property you don’t have the money to pay for up front, whether you’re a first-time buyer, remortgaging, securing a buy to let, or moving to your next home.

With a repayment mortgage, you pay the loan back in monthly instalments including interest, after putting down a deposit. Alternatively, with an interest-only mortgage, you will repay just the interest and you will repay the capital loan at the end of the mortgage term.

Your mortgage term is how long you’ll make repayments for. The usual maximum term in the UK is 25 years, but you can choose a shorter or longer period, with some providers offering extended terms of up to 40 years. If you have a longer term, your monthly repayments will be lower, but the debt will take longer to pay off and you’ll pay more interest overall.

The amount you need to borrow will depend on the purchase price of the property, and how much you can put down as a deposit.

The loan is secured against the property, which means your home is at risk if you don’t meet the repayments.

How much will my mortgage cost?

The cost of your mortgage will depend on various factors, such as how much you borrow, the size of your deposit, how long your mortgage term is, the mortgage rate you’re paying, and whether you can afford to make overpayments. Your mortgage lender must provide you with the full cost of the mortgage before you apply.

» MORE: How much could your mortgage cost you?

What other costs might I need to pay?

Besides making sure your monthly repayments are affordable, there are many other costs associated with arranging a mortgage to consider, including survey, valuation and mortgage broker fees.

If you’ve previously owned a home and the property you’re buying is worth more than £125,000, stamp duty will be payable as well; if you’re a first-time buyer, stamp duty only becomes payable on properties worth over £300,000.

» MORE: What are the costs of buying a house?

Can I get a first-time buyer mortgage?

You should be able to get a mortgage as a first-time buyer, as long as you have a deposit and a steady income. Lenders will take your financial situation into account, but many have dedicated first-time buyer mortgages, which may offer higher LTVs and let you have a fixed rate for a number of years. This may help you plan your future finances and make the first step on the property ladder a little less daunting.

First-time buyers may also be able to secure a mortgage with the help of close relatives through family deposit or family offset mortgages

» MORE: Find first-time buyer mortgage deals

How do I get a buy-to-let mortgage?

Many providers offer dedicated buy-to-let mortgages for properties you rent out to a tenant, rather than live in yourself. These tend to come with extra lending criteria and certain limits. You’ll usually need a larger deposit than for a residential mortgage, and interest rates are often higher. You may also need to already own your own home or have a residential mortgage on another property.

» MORE: Find buy-to-let mortgage deals

Can I get a mortgage with bad credit?

Lenders use credit scores to help decide if they should approve mortgage applications. So a mortgage can be difficult to get if you have a poor credit history, or have been bankrupt in the past. But you may be able to get a mortgage through a specialist lender, or with the help of a guarantor.

Should I remortgage?

You may want to remortgage once your initial fixed-rate period expires, or if your home has increased in value. This can save you money, if you find the right mortgage deal and meet the lending criteria.

If you stay with your provider and get a new agreement with a different interest rate, it’s likely only your monthly repayment amount will change. Switching mortgage providers may require added fees, so it’s worth checking if your current lender can offer you the mortgage deal you’re looking for first.

» MORE: Top remortgage deals

About the author:

Tim draws on 20 years’ experience at Virgin Money, Moneyfacts and Future to pen articles that always put consumers’ interests first. He has particular expertise in mortgages, pensions and savings. Read more

NerdWallet has selected Koodoo to provide you with this information-only online comparison service on a non-advised basis. NerdWallet will receive a share of the commission that Koodoo earns from the lender or from our partnered broker, Fluent Mortgages.

Koodoo is the trading name of Mortgage Power Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 845978), and is a registered company in England and Wales (company registration number 10978680), with a registered address at Scale Space, 58 Wood Lane, London, W12 7RZ

Fluent Mortgages Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 458914), and is a registered company in England and Wales (company registration number 10978680), with a registered address at 102 Rivington House, Chorley, New Road, Horwich, Bolton, BL6 5UE

Popular Mortgage Links