How to Rent Disney Vacation Club Points

Renting Disney Vacation Club points from timeshare owners can be a good way to save when resort prices are high.
Carissa Rawson
By Carissa Rawson 
Published

Many or all of the products featured here are from our partners who compensate us. This influences which products we write about and where and how the product appears on a page. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own. Here is a list of our partners and here's how we make money.

A trip to a Disney park may seem like the ultimate family vacation, but the costs to visit have ballooned, especially when it comes to lodging. While you may still be able to afford tickets and even meals, actually staying on Disney property may no longer be affordable if you’re paying the standard room rate.

If you want to stay at a Disney hotel without paying full price, consider checking out unoccupied Disney Vacation Club (DVC) rooms — which can cost significantly less for your stay. You can rent DVC points to book these properties for a one-time vacation without having to commit to owning a Disney timeshare yourself.

Let’s talk about how to rent DVC points and whether it’s worth the investment.

Make smarter financial decisions at Disney
Join our free webinar for magical money-saving hacks, smart credit card strategies, and more.

What is the Disney Vacation Club?

The Disney Vacation Club is the company’s timeshare program. Once you buy into it you’ll get a set home resort (at which you’ll receive reservation priority) and a specific number of points that you can redeem each year. These points can be used for stays at several Disney resorts, including those at Walt Disney World and Disneyland Resort.

The rooms and villas that are a part of the Disney Vacation Club are distinct from regular resort rooms. Because they’re oriented toward a longer stay, many include full-size condos with kitchens and multiple bedrooms.

However, you don’t have to be a member of the Disney Vacation Club to rent DVC rooms. It’s possible to book these online through Disney’s website, though you’ll often end up paying a lot out of pocket.

Instead, renting DVC points from owners can provide an excellent way to experience Disney at a discount. It’s a win-win for each of you; the owners, who can’t travel, can earn money by renting out their points while you get to save money and experience a Disney resort at a discount.

How does renting DVC points work?

Renting DVC points is simple. If you know someone who is a DVC owner, you can negotiate with them to rent their points.

However, if you don't know anyone in the Disney Vacation Club, don’t worry. There are online sites that connect DVC members and people who are looking to rent DVC points. Depending on how you book, you can either browse reservations that are instantly confirmable, or you can make a request for a reservation and hope someone fulfills it.

How to find DVC points for rent

There are several websites that will help you find DVC points to rent, including the following platforms that have been around for years:

  • David’s Vacation Club Rentals.

  • DVC Rental Store.

  • DVC Shop Rentals.

  • DVC-Rental.com.

Note that you may find different availability at each site. This is because individual owners must decide where they want to rent out their points; they aren’t automatically added to each site’s portal. So an owner listed on DVC Rental Store but not on David’s Vacation Club Rentals.

You’ll also want to be aware that different sites will charge different amounts for reservations, so you should compare stays and quotes at multiple sites.

Is it worth it to rent DVC points?

It may seem like a lot of effort to book a stay at a resort, so you may be wondering if it’s really worth it. The short answer is that, yes, you can save a lot of money by renting DVC points. The long answer is that the amount you’ll save is going to depend on how far in advance you’re booking, the room type you’re looking for and where you want to stay.

You’ll find the lowest prices on close-in confirmed reservations, as you’d expect. Near-term bookings are at risk of going vacant, so owners tend to reduce them to entice booking. In addition to getting you lower pricing, these types of bookings can also secure you a room when Disney’s website says that they’re sold out.

Here’s an example of a two-night stay in an overwater bungalow at Disney’s Polynesian Resort. For a trip with two weeks' notice, we found a two-night stay in a bungalow with two bedrooms, a full-sized kitchen and two bathrooms in a space that sleeps eight for $3,808.

Not only are these bungalows difficult to book — there are only 20 in the entire resort and the average room rate hovers around $3,200 per night, meaning an equivalent stay would usually cost $6,400 or more for two nights.

In this case, you’d save roughly 40% by booking with rented DVC points. That’s pretty incredible.

However, if you don’t have a ton of flexibility when it comes to when you can visit or where you’re looking to go, you can also opt to submit a request to rent an owner’s points. In this case, the further in advance that it is, the better it’ll be for you.

It’s more expensive to do a customized quote, but it can mean the difference between staying somewhere you’d really like versus staying in a property that doesn’t really suit your needs.

Still, even if you’re doing a customized quote, you can save money on your stay overall. For example, Dave’s Vacation Club Rentals will charge you between $20 and $25 per point for your stay. In practice, this means you can pay as little as $207 for a one-night stay at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Villas Jambo House. You’ll get a studio that sleeps four with a kitchenette and a balcony.

Compare this to the basic guest room, which only includes two beds, and you’ll still end up paying more than $300 per night, even when it’s on sale.

If you want to rent DVC points…

Renting DVC points can help save money on a Disney vacation, whether you’re traveling to Florida, California or any of Disney’s other resort properties.

While the process may be a little more complicated than usual, it’s definitely worth it for a Disney stay.


How to maximize your rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are some of the best travel credit cards of 2024:

Cards for Disney from our Partners
Chase Sapphire Reserve Credit Card

on Chase's website

Chase Sapphire Reserve®
5.0
NerdWallet Rating
Rewards rate

1x-10x

Earn 5x total points on flights and 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Travel℠ immediately after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually. Earn 3x points on other travel and dining & 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases.

Points

Intro offer

60,000

Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $900 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

Points
Chase Sapphire Preferred Credit Card

on Chase's website

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
5.0
NerdWallet Rating
Rewards rate

1x-5x

5x on travel purchased through Chase Travel℠, 3x on dining, select streaming services and online groceries, 2x on all other travel purchases, 1x on all other purchases.

Points

Intro offer

60,000

Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $750 when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

Points
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card

on Chase's website

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card
4.2
NerdWallet Rating
Rewards rate

1x-3x

Earn 3X points on Southwest® purchases. Earn 2X points on local transit and commuting, including rideshare. Earn 2X points on internet, cable, and phone services, and select streaming. Earn 1X points on all other purchases.

Points

Intro offer

85,000

Earn 85,000 bonus points after spending $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.

Points
See more cards for disney
Get more smart money moves – straight to your inbox
Sign up and we’ll send you Nerdy articles about the money topics that matter most to you along with other ways to help you get more from your money.