Taxes - Nerdwallet

Taxes

Taxes refer to the money the government collects from individuals and businesses, usually taken from income or added to the price of certain goods.

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Jeff Rose
Jeff Rose
CFP®, AAMS
Carbondale, IL
6 recent answers
Adam Harding
Adam Harding
CFP®
Scottsdale, AZ
5 recent answers
David Hunter
David Hunter
CFP®
Asheville, NC
5 recent answers
Michael Cash
Michael Cash
EA
Modesto, CA
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John C Brandy
John C Brandy
CFEd, AAMS
Redmond, WA
4 recent answers
All Questions: Taxes
NewPosted May 6, 2016 · San Francisco, CA

From the perspective of the Internal Revenue Service, the tax treatment of ETFs and mutual funds are the same. Both are subject to capital gains tax a...

NewPosted May 5, 2016 · Las Vegas, NV

On taxes: If the 401(k) was the balance of your mother's estate, then no estate tax is due because it is well under the federal exemption of ~$5.4m. B...

NewPosted May 3, 2016 · San Francisco, CA

Think of an IRA, 401(k) or 403(b) as a locked box: Pre-tax money goes in, grows (hopefully) over time without tax, and then gets taxed when it comes o...

NewPosted May 2, 2016 · Portland, OR

Yes, investments in life insurance policies have the potential to grow without incurring taxes on capital gains and current income. The same feature a...

NewPosted April 29, 2016 · San Francisco, CA

No. If you happened to be investing in an IRA or 401k then there would be no capital gains or losses anyway.

In an open ended mutual fund like the...

NewPosted April 27, 2016 · New York, NY
Leonard N. Katz

Leonard N. Katz

CRC, CWM, MFP, RFC

John covered a lot, however, some of your choices depend on the conditions that are set in he details of the company plan. In addition, there are IR...

NewPosted April 27, 2016

I admit the IRS rules relating to retirement accounts can be confusing. However Uncle Sam is going to get his money one way or another.

Once a taxabl...

NewPosted April 27, 2016 · Dallas, TX

Whoever sign for them. Being yoru father's exemption is irrelevant.

NewPosted April 27, 2016
Susan Honig

Susan Honig

CFP®, EA

Once again, "It Depends" is the answer. Having been your primary residence for less than 24 months may mean that you cannot use the exclusion and thus...

NewPosted April 27, 2016 · Boston, MA
Curtis (Curt) Sheldon

Curtis (Curt) Sheldon

AIF®, CFP®, EA, MBA

In general, your business will show a loss on Schedule C and that loss will carry over to Form 1040. If your wife also has a business that operates a...

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