Gift Stock Yields Better Returns Than Gift Checks

Investing
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By Daniel Johnson

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When thinking of giving a gift, most people immediately consider writing a check, giving a gift card to a favorite restaurant, or ordering something online.

However, from a financial planning perspective, this is a very inefficient method of giving. Unfortunately, the method that gets you the biggest bang for your buck is usually the most complex, impersonal and inconvenient, as is often the case in financial planning.

Let’s take a look at a few ways to get a little more “bang for your buck” with a gift.

Consider what the alternatives to giving cash might be. It is pretty hard to think of ways to give a gift without using cash.

One way to do so is to gift stock, preferably appreciated stock. It is very common for the individual giving (grantor) to be in a higher tax bracket than the individual receiving the gift (grantee). For this reason, the grantor is able to give more to the grantee because they don’t have to sell the stock, pay the taxes, then give the cash. To make the situation even better, the grantee may not even have to pay taxes when they sell the stock, if they are in the 0% to 15% tax bracket. This isn’t your traditional heart-warming gift from Grandmother, but the tax savings sure are heart-warming to me.

Another play on the same technique is to gift appreciated stock to young children in a custodial account. This allows either the grantor or a parent to act as a custodian over the account until the child reaches age 18 or 21, depending on state law. Appreciated stock can be directed into this account and sold over time with minimal tax consequences. However, you have to be aware of the “Kiddie Tax” for unearned income over $2,000 attributed to the child. Any amount over $2,000 is then taxed at the parents’ highest tax bracket! To extend this gifting strategy, cash produced by dividends and sales from this account can be transferred to a 529 savings plan in the name of the beneficiary. Just don’t forget to give the child something useful or fun at the same time.

Although these techniques are not as easy and straightforward as writing that check, there are some significant tax savings available for those who choose to use them. For individuals who are trying to play catch up on funding 529 plans or gifting to children or grandchildren, the annual gifting limit is $14,000 per year per person for 2014 and 2015.