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Farm Bureau Insurance: Is it Right for You?

Feb. 6, 2020
Auto Insurance, Insurance
At NerdWallet, we strive to help you make financial decisions with confidence. To do this, many or all of the products featured here are from our partners. However, this doesn’t influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own.

You don’t have to be a farmer to get Farm Bureau insurance.

Anyone can join the Farm Bureau for an annual fee — and one major perk of membership is access to Farm Bureau insurance.

The cost to join depends on where you live. The cheapest level, often called associate or community membership, typically runs $20 to $90 a year. People who work in agriculture can pay more for a regular membership, making them eligible to vote within the American Farm Bureau Federation on policy positions and partner discounts, among other initiatives. Membership is available through your state’s Farm Bureau office.

Farm Bureau insurance by state

Farm Bureau members can buy insurance through one of several companies, depending on the state. In 19 states, a statewide Farm Bureau insurance company writes and sells its own policies. Two regional Farm Bureau insurance companies serve 10 additional states.

In states without a Farm Bureau insurance company, members typically can get discounted insurance rates at partner companies including Alfa, Country Financial, American National and Nationwide Insurance. The one exception is Hawaii’s Farm Bureau chapter, which doesn’t offer auto or home insurance options for members.

Because each Farm Bureau insurance company is operated separately, the products they offer vary. In most states, you can get auto, homeowners and business insurance.


Farm Bureau insurance companies in each state

StateInsurance company
AlabamaPartnership with Alfa Insurance
AlaskaPartnership with Country Financial
ArizonaFarm Bureau Financial Services
ArkansasArkansas Farm Bureau Insurance
CaliforniaPartnership with Nationwide
ColoradoColorado Farm Bureau Insurance
ConnecticutPartnership with Nationwide
DelawarePartnership with Nationwide
FloridaFlorida Farm Bureau Insurance
GeorgiaGeorgia Farm Bureau Insurance
HawaiiNone
IdahoIdaho Farm Bureau Insurance
IllinoisPartnership with Country Financial
IndianaIndiana Farm Bureau Insurance
IowaFarm Bureau Financial Services
KansasFarm Bureau Financial Services
KentuckyKentucky Farm Bureau Insurance
LouisianaLouisiana Farm Bureau Insurance
MainePartnership with American National
MarylandPartnership with Nationwide
MassachusettsPartnership with American National
MichiganMichigan Farm Bureau Insurance
MinnesotaFarm Bureau Financial Services
MississippiMississippi Farm Bureau Insurance
MissouriMissouri Farm Bureau Insurance
MontanaMountain West Farm Bureau Insurance
NebraskaFarm Bureau Financial Services
NevadaPartnership with Country Financial
New HampshirePartnership with American National
New JerseyPartnership with American National
New MexicoFarm Bureau Financial Services
New YorkPartnership with Nationwide
North CarolinaNorth Carolina Farm Bureau Insurance
North DakotaNodak Insurance
OhioPartnership with Nationwide
OklahomaOklahoma Farm Bureau Insurance
OregonPartnership with Country Financial
PennsylvaniaPartnership with Nationwide
Rhode IslandPartnership with American National
South CarolinaSouth Carolina Farm Bureau Insurance
South DakotaFarm Bureau Financial Services
TennesseeFarm Bureau Insurance of Tennessee
TexasTexas Farm Bureau Insurance
UtahFarm Bureau Financial Services
VermontPartnership with Nationwide
VirginiaVirginia Farm Bureau Insurance
WashingtonPartnership with Country Financial
West VirginiaPartnership with Nationwide
WisconsinRural Mutual Insurance
WyomingMountain West Farm Bureau Insurance

Farm Bureau auto insurance rates

If you’re wondering why people who aren’t farmers would pay to join an agriculture association, a quick look at Farm Bureau car insurance rates makes it clear.

In several states, Farm Bureau auto insurance is the cheapest coverage a driver can get, without taking into account the membership fee. Here are some of the rock-bottom prices we found when we analyzed rates for a sample 40-year-old driver.

In Georgia, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $442 cheaper for a driver with a clean record and good credit buying full coverage insurance.
  • $1,414 cheaper for a driver with poor credit.
  • $1,248 cheaper after a recent at-fault crash.
  • $726 cheaper after a speeding ticket.
  • $722 cheaper after a DUI.
  • $173 cheaper for minimum required insurance coverage.

In Kentucky, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $796 cheaper for a good driver buying full coverage.
  • $1,445 cheaper for insurance after an at-fault crash.
  • $1,232 cheaper after a speeding ticket.
  • $439 cheaper for minimum coverage.

In Louisiana, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $2,326 cheaper for a driver who recently caused an accident.
  • $2,013 cheaper for someone with a DUI.
  • $1,537 cheaper for a driver with a speeding ticket.

In Missouri, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $730 cheaper after an at-fault accident.
  • $550 cheaper for insurance after a DUI.
  • $442 cheaper after a speeding ticket.
  • $190 cheaper for minimum coverage.

In North Carolina, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $490 cheaper for a driver who recently caused a wreck.
  • $335 cheaper for someone with a recent speeding ticket.
  • $80 cheaper for minimum required coverage.

In North Dakota, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $661 cheaper for a good driver buying full coverage.
  • $1,294 cheaper after a DUI.
  • $1,116 cheaper after an at-fault crash.
  • $1,104 cheaper to insure a driver with poor credit.
  • $892 cheaper after a speeding ticket.
  • $199 cheaper for minimum coverage.

In Tennessee, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $1,002 a year cheaper for a driver with poor credit.
  • $652 cheaper for a driver responsible for a recent wreck.

In Texas, compared with average car insurance rates statewide for our sample driver, Farm Bureau insurance was:

  • $430 cheaper for a good driver with full coverage.
  • $940 cheaper for a driver who caused a recent accident.
  • $779 cheaper for a driver with a DUI.
  • $640 cheaper for someone with poor credit.
  • $624 cheaper after a speeding ticket.
  • $223 cheaper for minimum required insurance.

But Farm Bureau insurance isn’t always a bargain choice. In several states, our analysis found Farm Bureau’s rates were in the middle of the pack, and in a handful of cases Farm Bureau was the most expensive.

  • In Idaho, Farm Bureau was the priciest insurer for drivers with a recent DUI. Rates after a DUI were $1,228 a year higher than the state average.
  • In South Carolina, Farm Bureau insurance was the most expensive option for drivers with good credit and a clean driving record, whether they were buying full or minimum coverage. Drivers would pay $222 a year more than the state average for full coverage and $109 a year more for minimum coverage.

Prices range widely because Farm Bureau insurance comes from more than 20 different companies, each with its own priorities and standards. State regulations and personal factors affect auto insurance prices as well. That’s why it’s important to compare car insurance rates before choosing coverage.

To get an idea of what to expect, review the average car insurance rates for your area in our roundup of the cheapest insurers in each state.

Farm Bureau complaints and customer satisfaction

Several Farm Bureau insurance companies earned strong ratings for customer satisfaction in J.D. Power’s 2019 Auto Insurance Study.

  • Farm Bureau Insurance of Tennessee: “Among the best” with the top award in the Southeast region.
  • Texas Farm Bureau Insurance: “Among the best” with the top award in the Texas region.
  • Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance: “Among the best” in the North Central region.
  • Michigan Farm Bureau Insurance: “Better than most” in the North Central region.
  • North Carolina Farm Bureau Insurance: “Better than most” in the Southeast region.
  • Farm Bureau Financial Services: “About average” in the Central region.
  • Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance: “About average” in the Southeast region.

Consumer complaints about most Farm Bureau insurers are lower than expected for companies of a similar size, according to three years’ worth of data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. NerdWallet looked at complaints reported to the NAIC for auto, home and life insurance. The Farm Bureau Insurance companies that didn’t have fewer than expected complaints for these policy types include:

  • Colorado Farm Bureau Insurance: More than expected for auto and home insurance.
  • Louisiana Farm Bureau Insurance: More than expected for home insurance, but fewer than expected for auto insurance.
  • Mountain West Farm Bureau Insurance: More than expected for auto and home insurance.
  • Rural Mutual Insurance: More than expected for home insurance, but fewer than expected for auto insurance.

Farm Bureau discounts

Discounts on a variety of goods and services come with the Farm Bureau membership. They run the gamut from agricultural equipment and services to travel and prescription drug discounts, including:

  • Hotel stays: Farm Bureau members get 20% off stays at Choice Hotels, Wyndham hotels and more.
  • Rental cars: Companies including Avis, Budget, Enterprise and Hertz offer discounts, depending on your state.
  • Pharmacies: Prescription discount cards are available in many states, offering discounts of as much as 75%.
  • Theme parks: Many state Farm Bureau chapters have partnered with local and national theme parks to provide discounts on admission for members and their families.
  • Farm equipment: Discounts are available for several brands.

METHODOLOGY: AVERAGE AUTO INSURANCE RATES

For our “good driver” profile, NerdWallet averaged rates from the largest insurers in the state for 40-year-old men and women in all ZIP codes with 12,000 annual miles driven. The policy includes:

  • $100,000 bodily injury liability per person.
  • $300,000 bodily injury liability per accident.
  • $50,000 property damage liability per accident.
  • $100,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person.
  • $300,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident.
  • Collision coverage with a $1,000 deductible.
  • Comprehensive coverage with a $1,000 deductible.

If required, minimum additional coverages were added. We used the same assumptions for all other driver profiles, with the following exceptions:

  • For drivers with minimum coverage, we adjusted the numbers above to reflect minimum required coverage by law in the state.
  • We changed the credit tier from “good” to “poor” as reported to the insurer to see rates for drivers with poor credit.
  • For drivers with one at-fault crash, we added a single at-fault crash costing $10,000 in property damage.
  • For drivers with a ticket, we added a single speeding violation for driving 16 mph over the speed limit.
  • For drivers with a DUI, we added a single drunken driving violation.

We used a 2016 Toyota Camry LE in all cases.

These are rates generated through Quadrant Information Services. Your own rates will be different.

METHODOLOGY: INSURER COMPLAINTS

NerdWallet examined complaints received by state insurance regulators and reported to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners in 2016-2018. To assess how insurers compare with one another, the NAIC calculates a complaint index each year for each subsidiary, measuring its share of total complaints relative to its size, or share of total premiums in the industry. To evaluate a company’s complaint history, NerdWallet calculated a similar index for each insurer, weighted by market shares of each subsidiary, over the three-year period. Ratios are determined separately for auto, home and life insurance.