Compare car insurance rates

The NerdWallet guide to finding the best car insurance rate

Many or all of the products featured here are from our partners who compensate us. This may influence which products we write about and where and how the product appears on a page. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own.


Comparison shopping is crucial if you want to save money on car insurance. Here’s why: Insurers look at similar factors, but they have their own “secret sauce” when it comes to setting rates. So two companies can charge wildly different rates for the same driver.




Auto insurance prices tend to inch up over time, but they can also go down. By shopping around, you might find that your current insurer offers the cheapest rate for you, or you might find that it’s time to switch.

Several factors go into an auto insurance rate: ZIP code, marital status, annual mileage, driving history and vehicle make, year and model. In most states, your gender and credit history could also be used to determine rates.


That’s why every year, NerdWallet analyzes car insurance rates for men and women with various driving and credit histories, in every single state and for every major auto insurance company, so you can compare auto insurance rates with ease and get the cheapest price for you.


Compare sample auto insurance rates by:


Compare car insurance rates

Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation, or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you average annual rates for minimum and full coverage car insurance policies by state and by company, from the top 10 private passenger auto insurers in the country based on 2019 market share data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. “Full coverage” policies have higher liability limits and include uninsured motorist protection, comprehensive and collision coverage.


Compare minimum and full coverage rates for 25-year-olds

Drivers around the age of 25 typically get higher car insurance rates because as a group they get into more accidents on average than older drivers.


Rates vary from company to company. For example, full coverage from American Family for a 25-year-old costs $1,386 a year, on average, while the average price from Liberty Mutual is $2,311.


Below you can compare annual rates for 25-year-olds by company and by state. Rates are averaged across the country separately for full and minimum coverage.


Company25-year-old with minimum coverage25-year-old with full coverage
Allstate$805$1,983
American Family$682$1,386
Farmers$1,003$2,092
Geico$558$1,426
Liberty Mutual$1,128$2,311
Nationwide$767$1,539
Progressive$808$1,959
State Farm$703$1,737
Travelers$833$1,703
USAA*$489$1,251

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


Average car insurance rates for a 25-year-old driver vary significantly from state to state. Some states, like Maine and Vermont, have average rates under $1,200 a year for full coverage. In other states, such as New Jersey and California, insurance costs more than $2,000 a year, on average, for the same driver profile.


See how your state stacks up below.


State25-year-old with minimum coverage25-year-old with full coverage
Alabama$636$1,649
Alaska$544$1,476
Arizona$646$1,613
Arkansas$644$1,700
California$778$2,044
Colorado$703$1,816
Connecticut$1,007$1,992
Delaware$924$1,779
District of Columbia$849$1,770
Florida$1,309$2,682
Georgia$791$1,862
Hawaii$487$1,176
Idaho$432$1,158
Illinois$508$1,364
Indiana$480$1,192
Iowa$359$1,189
Kansas$489$1,539
Kentucky$1,142$2,574
Louisiana$1,294$3,555
Maine$438$1,112
Maryland$917$1,881
Massachusetts$605$1,468
Michigan$1,290$2,507
Minnesota$632$1,472
Mississippi$642$1,746
Missouri$584$1,586
Montana$432$1,428
Nebraska$482$1,374
Nevada$1,006$2,139
New Hampshire$500$1,269
New Jersey$1,086$2,024
New Mexico$539$1,430
New York$1,067$2,165
North Carolina$446$1,173
North Dakota$449$1,460
Ohio$527$1,241
Oklahoma$640$1,793
Oregon$720$1,418
Pennsylvania$453$1,333
Rhode Island$928$1,956
South Carolina$759$1,706
South Dakota$363$1,449
Tennessee$505$1,444
Texas$753$1,721
Utah$665$1,416
Vermont$447$1,150
Virginia$380$1,185
Washington$746$1,501
West Virginia$572$1,534
Wisconsin$402$1,157
Wyoming$368$1,340

Back to top


Compare minimum and full coverage rates for 40-year-olds

Drivers around the age of 40 are in a car insurance sweet spot. Because this age group tends to get in fewer accidents than other age groups, they typically can get the cheapest rates. But prices will still vary from company to company. Aside from USAA, which is only available to military, veterans and their families, Geico provides the lowest price for full coverage cost for 40-year-olds at $1,198, on average, while Farmers Insurance comes in at the highest at $1,865, on average.


Compare national average annual car insurance rates for 40-year-olds by company and by state below. Keep in mind that not all of these companies are available in every state.


Company40-year-old with minimum coverage40-year-old with full coverage
Allstate$784$1,834
American Family$601$1,233
Farmers$926$1,865
Geico$478$1,198
Liberty Mutual$900$1,778
Nationwide$682$1,349
Progressive$774$1,766
State Farm$624$1,511
Travelers$815$1,528
USAA*$415$1,023

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


While average car insurance rates fluctuate by state, 40-year-olds in several states, including Idaho, Indiana and Virginia, can pay less than $1,000 a year, on average, for full coverage policies. Similar drivers in other states could pay less than $2,000 a year for full coverage, on average. Only four states charge more than $2,000 a year to 40-year-old drivers with full coverage car insurance: Kentucky, Michigan, Florida and Louisiana.


See how your state stacks up below.


State40-year-old with minimum coverage40-year-old with full coverage
Alabama$558$1,401
Alaska$456$1,180
Arizona$581$1,409
Arkansas$558$1,427
California$636$1,627
Colorado$636$1,570
Connecticut$854$1,683
Delaware$839$1,559
District of Columbia$755$1,527
Florida$1,188$2,352
Georgia$690$1,594
Hawaii$487$1,176
Idaho$362$937
Illinois$437$1,163
Indiana$409$994
Iowa$309$997
Kansas$434$1,306
Kentucky$983$2,161
Louisiana$1,150$2,971
Maine$367$916
Maryland$800$1,595
Massachusetts$550$1,299
Michigan$1,285$2,331
Minnesota$579$1,280
Mississippi$513$1,385
Missouri$505$1,339
Montana$395$1,252
Nebraska$420$1,181
Nevada$902$1,881
New Hampshire$415$1,056
New Jersey$994$1,759
New Mexico$484$1,241
New York$1,026$1,962
North Carolina$411$1,075
North Dakota$400$1,235
Ohio$463$1,051
Oklahoma$583$1,595
Oregon$639$1,228
Pennsylvania$413$1,167
Rhode Island$820$1,684
South Carolina$656$1,458
South Dakota$312$1,245
Tennessee$426$1,170
Texas$664$1,471
Utah$607$1,248
Vermont$381$960
Virginia$327$993
Washington$652$1,261
West Virginia$504$1,307
Wisconsin$359$1,005
Wyoming$333$1,184

Back to top


Compare car insurance rates for drivers with a DUI

After a DUI, your auto insurance rate will go up — in some cases, 75% or more. But one thing you can control that can affect rates the most is your insurance company. A DUI can affect car insurance rates for 3 to 10 years, so it’s best to shop around for the best price after getting one.


Below you can compare company averages for 40-year-olds before and after a DUI. Keep in mind that not all of these companies are available in every state.


CompanyDrivers without a DUIDrivers with a DUI
Allstate$1,834$3,301
American Family$1,233$1,397
Farmers$1,865$2,866
Geico$1,198$2,743
Liberty Mutual$1,778$4,128
Nationwide$1,349$3,016
Progressive$1,766$2,263
State Farm$1,511$2,549
Travelers$1,528$2,332
USAA*$1,023$1,925

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


While your rate will increase after a DUI, how much it does depends in part on which state you live in. In Missouri, the average rate for drivers with a recent DUI is 43% higher, on average, than for similar drivers with no incidents — $571 more a year. However, a DUI in North Carolina more than tripled average rates in our analysis, adding more than $3,000 to the annual cost of full coverage car insurance for 40-year-old drivers.


See below for how your state measures up.


StateDrivers without a DUIDrivers with a DUI
Alabama$1,401$2,484
Alaska$1,180$1,842
Arizona$1,409$2,793
Arkansas$1,427$2,369
California$1,627$4,006
Colorado$1,570$2,373
Connecticut$1,683$3,169
Delaware$1,559$2,583
District of Columbia$1,527$2,571
Florida$2,352$3,681
Georgia$1,594$2,914
Hawaii$1,176$4,153
Idaho$937$1,494
Illinois$1,163$1,888
Indiana$994$1,538
Iowa$997$1,694
Kansas$1,306$2,177
Kentucky$2,161$3,598
Louisiana$2,971$4,118
Maine$916$1,521
Maryland$1,595$2,543
Massachusetts$1,299$2,352
Michigan$2,331$5,807
Minnesota$1,280$2,337
Mississippi$1,385$2,297
Missouri$1,339$1,910
Montana$1,252$2,092
Nebraska$1,181$1,737
Nevada$1,881$2,987
New Hampshire$1,056$1,866
New Jersey$1,759$3,013
New Mexico$1,241$1,954
New York$1,962$2,960
North Carolina$1,075$4,409
North Dakota$1,235$2,190
Ohio$1,051$1,701
Oklahoma$1,595$2,491
Oregon$1,228$1,837
Pennsylvania$1,167$1,837
Rhode Island$1,684$3,346
South Carolina$1,458$2,203
South Dakota$1,245$2,186
Tennessee$1,170$2,096
Texas$1,471$2,290
Utah$1,248$1,898
Vermont$993$2,052
Virginia$960$1,567
Washington$1,261$2,024
West Virginia$1,307$2,090
Wisconsin$1,005$1,935
Wyoming$1,184$2,179

Back to top


Compare car insurance rates for drivers with poor credit

Your credit history is one of the largest factors affecting your car insurance quote in all states except California, Hawaii and Massachusetts. While rates can double in some cases, it’s important to note that every company considers credit very differently, and even among insurers this factor fluctuates by state. Drivers with poor credit insured by Liberty Mutual could pay an average of 40% more — $719 more a year — compared to similar drivers with good credit. Meanwhile, State Farm’s average price for full coverage more than doubles for drivers with poor credit compared to those with good credit.


Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with poor credit by company.


CompanyGood drivers with good credit Good drivers with poor credit
Allstate$1,834$2,907
American Family$1,233$2,045
Farmers$1,865$3,227
Geico$1,198$1,748
Liberty Mutual$1,778$2,497
Nationwide$1,349$1,896
Progressive$1,766$3,238
State Farm$1,511$3,114
Travelers$1,528$2,803
USAA*$1,023$1,925

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


Certain states prohibit the use of credit in setting rates, and how insurers treat credit differs from state to state. For example, state legislators in one state may allow more wiggle room for credit-based pricing than others, leading to variations by state.


Our analysis found that:

  • In North Carolina, a driver with poor credit could pay about 33% more than a good credit driver.
  • Having poor credit in Utah doubles the average insurance rate compared to drivers with good credit.
  • Average rates for poor credit drivers in Michigan were about 2.4 times the average rates for good credit drivers.

Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with poor credit by state.


StateGood drivers with good credit Good drivers with poor credit
Alabama$1,401$2,525
Alaska$1,180$1,753
Arizona$1,409$3,037
Arkansas$1,427$2,445
California*$1,627$1,627
Colorado$1,570$2,799
Connecticut$1,683$3,436
Delaware$1,559$2,873
District of Columbia$1,527$2,756
Florida$2,352$4,267
Georgia$1,594$2,566
Hawaii*$1,176$1,176
Idaho$937$1,599
Illinois$1,163$2,022
Indiana$994$1,742
Iowa$997$1,737
Kansas$1,306$2,218
Kentucky$2,161$3,827
Louisiana$2,971$4,958
Maine$916$1,905
Maryland$1,595$2,678
Massachusetts*$1,299$1,299
Michigan$2,331$5,513
Minnesota$1,280$2,539
Mississippi$1,385$2,182
Missouri$1,339$2,480
Montana$1,252$2,098
Nebraska$1,181$1,968
Nevada$1,881$3,074
New Hampshire$1,056$2,162
New Jersey$1,759$3,686
New Mexico$1,241$2,006
New York$1,962$4,233
North Carolina$1,075$1,425
North Dakota$1,235$2,295
Ohio$1,051$1,797
Oklahoma$1,595$2,725
Oregon$1,228$2,115
Pennsylvania$1,167$2,034
Rhode Island$1,684$2,915
South Carolina$1,458$2,984
South Dakota$1,245$2,144
Tennessee$1,170$2,267
Texas$1,471$2,616
Utah$1,248$2,507
Vermont$993$1,705
Virginia$960$1,547
Washington$1,261$2,261
West Virginia$1,307$2,392
Wisconsin$1,005$1,809
Wyoming$1,184$1,863

*Credit-based pricing is banned in California, Hawaii and Massachusetts.


Back to top


Compare car insurance rates for drivers with a ticket

After you get a speeding ticket, your auto insurance rates will go up — typically about 25%. But the amount your rate goes up depends on the state you live in and your insurance company. American Family’s average rates for drivers with a speeding ticket were 5% more than for drivers with a clean record in our analysis. By contrast, Liberty Mutual’s rates for drivers with a speeding ticket are 34% more than for those with a clean record, on average. Since a ticket can stay on your driving record anywhere from 1 to 3 years, it’s always best to shop around to find the cheapest rates.


Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with a recent ticket by company.


CompanyDrivers with a clean driving historyDrivers with a recent ticket
Allstate$1,834$2,172
American Family$1,233$1,289
Farmers$1,865$2,476
Geico$1,198$1,557
Liberty Mutual$1,778$2,383
Nationwide$1,349$1,697
Progressive$1,766$2,281
State Farm$1,511$1,784
Travelers$1,528$1,990
USAA*$1,023$1,200

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


You can also compare car insurance rates by state. In some states like Pennsylvania and Texas, average rates for drivers with a speeding ticket are 12% higher, on average, than for drivers with no violations. In other states a speeding ticket resulted in 40% higher rates — or more, such as in Hawaii, where a ticket costs an additional 74% in car insurance premiums, on average.


Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with a recent ticket by state.


StateDrivers with a clean driving history Drivers with a recent ticket
Alabama$1,401$1,707
Alaska$1,180$1,364
Arizona$1,409$1,847
Arkansas$1,427$1,813
California$1,627$2,321
Colorado$1,570$1,864
Connecticut$1,683$2,130
Delaware$1,559$1,901
District of Columbia$1,527$1,802
Florida$2,352$2,946
Georgia$1,594$1,980
Hawaii1,1762,050
Idaho$937$1,163
Illinois$1,163$1,483
Indiana$994$1,299
Iowa$997$1,149
Kansas$1,306$1,583
Kentucky$2,161$2,597
Louisiana$2,971$3,642
Maine$916$1,197
Maryland$1,595$1,884
Massachusetts$1,299$1,669
Michigan$2,331$3,416
Minnesota$1,280$1,601
Mississippi$1,385$1,769
Missouri$1,339$1,577
Montana$1,252$1,571
Nebraska$1,181$1,451
Nevada$1,881$2,281
New Hampshire$1,056$1,317
New Jersey$1,759$2,281
New Mexico$1,241$1,474
New York$1,962$2,310
North Carolina$1,075$1,568
North Dakota$1,235$1,573
Ohio$1,051$1,310
Oklahoma$1,595$2,008
Oregon$1,228$1,516
Pennsylvania$1,167$1,303
Rhode Island$1,684$2,188
South Carolina$1,458$1,755
South Dakota$1,245$1,453
Tennessee$1,170$1,421
Texas$1,471$1,665
Utah$1,248$1,467
Vermont$993$1,141
Virginia$960$1,153
Washington$1,261$1,533
West Virginia$1,307$1,533
Wisconsin$1,005$1,255
Wyoming$1,184$1,596

Back to top


Compare minimum and full coverage rates for drivers with an accident

Among the largest companies, your history of accidents will affect your auto insurance quote in very different ways. Check out how each insurer's average rates for drivers with an accident stack up before you start comparison shopping for auto insurance. If you have an on-record accident, make sure to compare car insurance quotes one, three and five years after the date of the incident to continue to get the best and cheapest rate possible.


The cheapest car insurance company for a driver with a clean history might not be the cheapest company after an at-fault accident occurs. For example, while USAA typically has the best price for drivers with a clean driving history, our data shows that American Family has the cheapest average rates for drivers with a recent at-fault accident — with rates after an accident only 13% higher, on average, than for our base profile.


Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with a recent at-fault accident by company


CompanyDrivers with a clean driving historyDrivers with a recent at-fault accident
Allstate$1,834$2,904
American Family$1,233$1,391
Farmers$1,865$2,783
Geico$1,198$1,888
Liberty Mutual$1,778$2,837
Nationwide$1,349$2,128
Progressive$1,766$2,980
State Farm$1,511$1,968
Travelers$1,528$2,071
USAA*$1,023$1,482

*USAA is only available to military, veterans and their families.


State legislators set limits on how much a company can increase your rates after a crash. Our hypothetical accident resulted in $10,000 worth of damage. That caused average annual rates to spike by $1,000 or more in some states, while others jumped by far less. For example, rates in Idaho for full coverage policies and drivers with a recent at-fault accident were $349 per year more, on average, than for drivers with for no accidents. Meanwhile, rates in Louisiana averaged over $1,600 more after causing an accident than for incident-free drivers.


One thing’s for sure: Your rates will likely increase after an at-fault accident, so be sure to compare car insurance rates if you have one on record. Below you can compare average full coverage rates for 40-year-old drivers with a recent at-fault accident by state.


StateDrivers with a clean driving historyDrivers with a recent at-fault accident
Alabama$1,401$2,035
Alaska$1,180$1,687
Arizona$1,409$2,086
Arkansas$1,427$2,231
California$1,627$2,927
Colorado$1,570$2,265
Connecticut$1,683$2,644
Delaware$1,559$2,170
District of Columbia$1,527$2,158
Florida$2,352$3,220
Georgia$1,594$2,512
Hawaii1,1761,581
Idaho$937$1,286
Illinois$1,163$1,731
Indiana$994$1,502
Iowa$997$1,450
Kansas$1,306$1,887
Kentucky$2,161$3,238
Louisiana$2,971$4,593
Maine$916$1,314
Maryland$1,595$2,311
Massachusetts$1,299$2,290
Michigan$2,331$3,566
Minnesota$1,280$1,779
Mississippi$1,385$2,049
Missouri$1,339$1,910
Montana$1,252$1,848
Nebraska$1,181$1,738
Nevada$1,881$2,811
New Hampshire$1,056$1,629
New Jersey$1,759$2,802
New Mexico$1,241$1,827
New York$1,962$2,576
North Carolina$1,075$1,833
North Dakota$1,235$1,865
Ohio$1,051$1,702
Oklahoma$1,595$2,440
Oregon$1,228$1,808
Pennsylvania$1,167$1,780
Rhode Island$1,684$2,522
South Carolina$1,458$2,100
South Dakota$1,245$1,726
Tennessee$1,170$1,746
Texas$1,471$2,150
Utah$1,248$1,793
Vermont$993$1,540
Virginia$960$1,417
Washington$1,261$1,866
West Virginia$1,307$1,872
Wisconsin$1,005$1,473
Wyoming$1,184$1,678

Back to top


How to compare car insurance quotes

First of all, every car insurance rate quote you receive should be free —whether it's from Geico, Farmers or a small insurer you've never heard of. Some auto insurers require a down payment to start your policy, but a simple quote estimate should always be free. Here's how to start comparing quotes.


1. Gather your information

To quickly and easily compare car insurance quotes, have the following on hand:

  • Personal information, which includes the address, date of birth, occupation, driver's license and marital status of everyone you want included on the policy.
  • Vehicle information: Mileage, date of purchase and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) for each car. Or, if you haven’t purchased the car yet, have mileage, make, model and year handy.
  • Driving history: Include all claims, violations and tickets you've had over the past five years, plus any completed driving courses.
  • Current or previous insurer’s name for anyone on the policy or in your household. Some insurers won’t cover you without some coverage history, and if you want to exclude anyone living with you from the policy, you’ll need to prove they’re covered elsewhere.

2. Choose the right liability car insurance coverage levels

Auto insurance is financial protection, and not just for the investment you made when you bought your car. After a really serious accident, bills for damage and injuries can easily reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you happen to cause such a wreck, the victims could sue you. In the worst case scenario, assets such as your savings and home could be seized.


Liability auto insurance protects you from that worst case scenario by providing a cushion between your assets and the amount you’re on the hook for. For this reason, choosing the right auto liability limits is the most important part of your car insurance quote comparison. NerdWallet typically recommends having at least as much liability coverage as your net worth.


But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.


These coverages come in thousand-dollar increments, so when you choose an auto insurance policy with 100/300/100 limits, you’ll be choosing:


  • $100,000 for bodily injuries per person you injure in a crash.
  • $300,000 total for all bodily injuries you cause in a crash.
  • $100,000 for damage to any property you cause in a crash, including cars, buildings and objects like mailboxes and lampposts.

When choosing liability car insurance coverage, try to make sure the highest, middle number is equal to or greater than the value of your house and total savings combined.


Understand car insurance requirements in your state

In certain states, you may be required to have a car insurance policy that includes personal injury protection (PIP), medical payments coverage (medpay) or uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages — or two of the three. If you have medpay you don’t need PIP, and vice versa.


Any car insurance comparison tool you look at should have your state’s minimum car insurance requirements pre-loaded into its options. States requiring PIP or medpay are generally referred to as “no-fault” states, meaning that when injuries occur, each driver in a crash makes a claim with their own insurance company to pay for them. Beyond the PIP or medpay limit, the at-fault driver’s liability insurance kicks in to cover the rest.


3. Decide if you need full coverage car insurance

You’ll notice that none of that liability coverage pays for your car or injuries, nor for any injuries your passengers sustain if you cause a wreck. This is why many people — particularly those whose car isn’t yet paid off — want “full coverage” car insurance. This isn’t actually a type of coverage, but instead typically refers to policies that include liability coverage, plus comprehensive and collision coverages.


In other words, you can’t just click a “full coverage” button when comparing insurance quotes online or buy something called a full coverage auto insurance policy. You’ll need to add collision and comprehensive coverage in the amounts you want.


Collision insurance pays for:Comprehensive insurance pays for:
  • Damage to your car in an accident you cause.
  • Damage to your car if you hit an object such as a fence or pole.
  • Damage to your car if someone else hits you. Another option in this case is to make a claim against the other driver's liability insurance.

The value of your car if it's stolen and not recovered, and damage from:

  • Weather such as tornadoes or hail.
  • Floods.
  • Fire.
  • Falling objects.
  • Explosions.
  • Crashes with an animal, such as striking a deer.
  • Riots and civil disturbances.

Auto insurance quote comparison tip: Whatever coverage you choose, make sure you compare the quotes for the same type and amount of coverage so you can find the best price.


4. Collect and compare car insurance quotes

You'll want to get car insurance quotes from at least two or three companies available in your area to be sure you're getting a good deal. Consider comparing quotes from regional companies as well as the big companies such as Allstate, Progressive and State Farm. While shopping, make certain that each insurance quote includes:


  • The same levels of liability and uninsured/underinsured motorist protection.
  • The same deductibles for collision and comprehensive coverages, if you’re buying them.
  • The same drivers and cars.
  • All discounts you’re eligible for (most insurers list the discounts they offer on their websites).


Back to top


Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I need to compare auto insurance quotes?

Comparing car insurance rate quotes is the best way to ensure that you’re getting the most bang for your buck. Auto insurance companies look at similar factors but weigh them differently, so you’ll get differing quotes from each.


We recommend you shop around and compare rate quotes for car insurance about once a year — this is your best bet at getting the cheapest rate. If you’ve been in a recent at-fault accident, received a speeding ticket or are about to move out of state, shop around again..


Does an auto insurance rate change depending on your gender?

It depends. Some states — Hawaii, Massachusetts, Montana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and some parts of Michigan — have banned the practice of calculating auto insurance rates based on a person’s gender. But in other states, women may pay more, on average, for car insurance compared to men with similar driving records. For young adults, the trend is flipped — young men tend to pay more than women.


But switching companies can wipe out that price difference, so your best bet is to shop around to find the cheapest insurance rate you can.


Is auto insurance cheaper for homeowners?

Oftentimes, yes. Most insurers offer discounts for customers that bundle home and auto insurance, while others offer a separate discount just for being a homeowner. Bundling policies might also make it easier for you to keep track of your coverage and claims.


Combining policies is usually best reserved for drivers with a solid driving history. If you have multiple traffic violations, poor credit or other negative marks on your driving record, you might be better off shopping for auto insurance and homeowners insurance from separate companies.


How do I get cheap rideshare insurance?

Many auto insurance companies offer rideshare insurance as an add-on to your current policy — typically around $15 more a month. If your insurer doesn’t offer the option, your best bet is to switch to one that does and stay properly covered.


If you’re unable to get rideshare insurance in your state, you may need to purchase a commercial insurance policy to ensure that you have the full coverage required.


Do I need to compare auto insurance rates if I move out of state?

While it may come as a surprise, one of the largest factors affecting your car insurance quote will be something you wouldn’t change just for cheaper car insurance — where you live. However, it does have a very big impact and should be part of financial planning if you move out of your area. For that reason, it’s good to do a car insurance quote comparison anytime you move, even within the same state.


Compare car insurance companies

Use NerdWallet's reviews to compare car insurance companies and find the best one for you. NerdWallet has researched policy options, consumer complaint data, customer satisfaction ratings, financial stability and more for all of the country's top auto insurance companies as well as many smaller, regional insurers.