Best Cities for Quality of Life - NerdWallet

Best Cities for Quality of Life

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Looking to improve your quality of life? Consider moving.

A new study by NerdWallet found that some U.S. cities seem to offer a better overall lifestyle than other places. We looked at income and health benefits, local economic strength, as well as work-life balance to find the best places for quality of life.

We may need the help. Recent research by a Cornell University professor found greater levels of chronic stress in low-income families who live in adverse conditions, which leads to lower levels of cognitive stimulation for children in those neighborhoods. Therefore, it’s clear that stress stemming from income, employment and poverty can severely affect one’s well-being.

Working too much can also be a great source of stress, yet a recent study revealed 41% of American workers will not use all of their paid time off this year.

NerdWallet’s analysis

To determine the best cities for quality of life, we analyzed some common sources of stress:

  1. Income, affordability and health benefits: Income, cost of living and health insecurity can be a great source of stress, so we included median annual rent as a percentage of median earnings for full-time, year-round workers in addition to percentage of population with health insurance coverage.
  2. Local economy: We looked at the percentage of people with income below the poverty level and the local unemployment rate.
  3. Work-life balance: We included mean weekly hours worked as well as mean travel time to work to see where people work fewer hours and spend less time commuting.

Key takeaways

  • Of the top 10 cities, six are in the Midwest, including two each from Minnesota and Nebraska. Strong local economies and high rates of affordability helped these cities’ rankings.
  • In the top 10 cities, an average of 22.8% of income goes to rent, while rent costs take up 27.1% of the average income across all cities.
  • 87.5% of people in the top 10 cities have health insurance coverage compared to 81.4% elsewhere in the U.S.
  • The average unemployment rate for the top 10 places is 4.8%, lower than the nationwide rate of 6.2%.
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To view the full ranking of all 100 cities and download the data, click here.

For more information on how affordable it is to live in each of these places, check out NerdWallet’s cost of living calculator. For similar studies and more, visit NerdWallet Cities. In the chart below, click on a category to see the data.

1. Madison, Wisconsin

If you’re looking to improve your quality of life, consider moving to Madison. The city offers a great work-life balance, high affordability and health insurance coverage rates, and a low unemployment rate. At the center of the city lies the largest public university in the state, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which focuses on “improving the quality of life for all” in its mission statement.

2. Lincoln, Nebraska

Lincoln offers a low cost of living (just 20.6% of the average income goes to rent, which is lower than the country’s 27.1% average) as well as one of the lowest unemployment rates of any metropolitan city in the U.S. This city is also home to the largest university in the state, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, which contributes to the local workforce and strengthens the local economy.

3. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Workers in Minneapolis enjoy a healthy work-life balance, a relatively low cost of living and high rates of health coverage. The city also boasts a vibrant culture with a strong arts scene: Minneapolis is home to the second-highest number of live theaters per capita in the U.S. after New York City. The University of Minnesota, one of the largest public universities in the nation, is located in Minneapolis, which helps boost the local economy.

4. St. Paul, Minnesota

St. Paul offers the same attractive qualities to workers as Minneapolis, its twin city, scoring especially highly in the income, affordability and health insurance coverage factors. Outside of the office, people here can enjoy many cultural and outdoor amenities, including performing arts centers, parks and more. The city also boasts 26 miles of Mississippi riverfront, the most of any city on the river.

5. Omaha, Nebraska

Workers in Omaha enjoy a work-life balance with a relatively low number of average weekly hours worked and short commutes. The major industries in Omaha include service, trade, transportation and finance. Local universities such as the University of Nebraska Omaha and Creighton University also help contribute to the low unemployment rate in the region.

6. Buffalo, New York

People working in Buffalo spend less than 36 hours a week at the office, much lower than most other cities in the country. About 21.9% of their paychecks go to rent every year, which is a relatively low figure that signifies a lower cost of living than in many other large cities. The top industries in the region are finance, technology, health care and education, while the largest university, University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York system, is renowned for its research programs.

7. Lexington, Kentucky

Lexington boasts a lower mean number of weekly hours worked and average commute times to go with its relatively low poverty rate. The top employer in the city is also the largest college in the state, the University of Kentucky.

8. Lubbock, Texas

If your commute to work stresses you out, Lubbock might be the place for you. The average travel time to work is just 15.5 minutes, the lowest of all 100 cities studied. Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock, and in addition to contributing to the local workforce with its graduates, the college also is the largest employer in the region.

9. Fort Wayne, Indiana

People in Fort Wayne enjoy a great deal of affordability: only 19% of residents’ paychecks go to rent, which is the lowest of all 100 cities. Residents can use their time away from work to enjoy the city’s many cultural attractions — from its museums to annual events like the Three Rivers Festival every summer.

10. Fremont, California

Located in the southeast region of the San Francisco Bay Area, Fremont is home to the lowest rate of poverty of all of our 100 cities — only 6.7% of residents earn an income below the poverty level. Major employers in the city include the Fremont Unified School District, Tesla and Western Digital. Fremont is also home to Ohlone College as well as an extension campus of the University of California-Berkeley.

Top 20 cities for quality of life

Scroll right to see all data categories.

RankCityMedian annual rent as percentage of median incomePercent of population with health insurance coveragePercent of people with income below poverty levelUnemployment rateMean weekly hours workedMean travel time to work (minutes)Overall Quality of Life Score
1Madison, Wisconsin23.08%92.90%19.60%4.30%35.419.086.28
2Lincoln, Nebraska20.55%88.00%14.60%3.30%37.617.983.61
3Minneapolis, Minnesota21.60%87.80%22.70%4.50%36.622.776.08
4St. Paul, Minnesota22.87%88.60%22.40%4.50%36.722.675.86
5Omaha, Nebraska23.94%85.30%18.10%4.10%38.018.275.76
6Buffalo, New York21.93%90.80%30.90%6.00%35.920.973.58
7Lexington-Fayette urban county, Kentucky20.98%87.30%17.70%6.40%37.619.173.57
8Lubbock, Texas27.26%82.00%24.70%4.50%37.115.573.07
9Fort Wayne, Indiana19.00%82.60%19.20%5.60%37.519.972.80
10Fremont, California26.67%90.80%6.70%5.20%37.730.472.66
11Toledo, Ohio19.76%85.90%30.10%6.00%36.219.472.44
12Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania22.59%90.20%21.10%5.50%37.523.272.34
13Seattle, Washington23.61%89.00%13.60%5.00%38.125.972.23
14Honolulu, Hawaii35.77%92.80%12.40%4.50%38.621.772.07
15Wichita, Kansas21.17%83.70%17.90%5.40%38.617.871.70
16Portland, Oregon23.90%85.40%17.70%6.10%36.724.271.06
17Raleigh, North Carolina24.96%85.50%16.40%5.20%38.920.869.16
18Boston, Massachusetts29.31%95.00%21.60%5.20%37.229.868.68
19Chesapeake, Virginia28.43%90.80%10.70%5.90%38.925.368.39
20Colorado Springs, Colorado24.79%85.60%14.40%6.70%38.620.867.65

Methodology

The overall score for each city was calculated from the following measures:

  1. Mean weekly hours worked from the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.
  2. Mean travel time to work from the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.
  3. Median annual rent as percentage of median income from the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.
  4. Percentage of population with health insurance coverage from the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.
  5. Percentage of people with income below the poverty level from the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.
  6. Unemployment rate of the metropolitan area from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

All six variables were weighted equally. The study analyzed the 100 largest U.S. cities.


Image via iStock.

  • Did you find this article helpful?
  • yes   no
  • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

    There appears to be an abundance of smaller, Midwest college towns. It might appear that that there were some prejudices (or omissions) in the somewhat limited and arbitrary rating factors. What about such factors as longevity, climate or income potential?

    • http://ecofrugality.blogspot.com/ Amy Livingston

      I guess the problem with factoring in climate is that people’s preferences differ. You can’t just look at the average summertime high and winter low temperatures and conclude that the most temperate climates are “nicest.”

      • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

        True, but it is a fact that many “northerners” retire to southern locations (or at least more temperate climates) so there must be some prevalent general preferences for climate that need to be considered. Having left the Midwest in 1980 for Florida, I would be hard pressed to spend a winter in 8 of the 10 cities they chose.

        • ty

          Ugh. Florida just brings to mind muggy, humid and miserable, filled with old people and swarthy time share con artists with thinning, greasy hair slicked back with a gold incisor.

          • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

            Ty – Are you just generally negative and prejudiced or a true misanthrope?

          • Jonathan Mac Donald

            Ty, I think that you will be miserable anywhere! But, you clearly are opinionated without the knowledge to be so. Florida – really? Unless moving to the retirement areas I dont see inundation of retired people, I see young, international cosmopolitan people. More move here than any other state, young AND old. Try and make comments that you actually have enough experience or knowledge of. We have more beautiful “winter / dry” months than most cities have summer (which in Northern Climates summer has many hot, muggy days after a terrible winter). BUT, mentioning “Florida” as Disney World or retirement just shows you know nothing! Instead of looking for a city try and find a medication for your negativity and seemingly chronically depressed state!

          • festmatt5440

            Then leave ‘ , go to NEW YORK ” .

          • NoTofu

            You’ve obviously never been to Tampa. It’s warm and muggy, but you get used to it and there is so much to do, and the people are extremely friendly. Do you have a bias toward elderly people? You should hang out with more of them, as they’d teach you a few things about life.

        • Twinkiedawn

          I’ve lived in the Northeast, the South and I’ve lived in the Twin Cities of Minnesota for the last 37 years. We’ve traveled the US looking for something better for retirement because of the cold. So far, we haven’t seen anything that can top this area for cost of living, things to do such as theater, great restaurants, art and music. I’ve learned to never say never but I’m 99.99999% convinced that I wouldn’t move to the south, especially Florida – not ever.

        • festmatt5440

          wimp ‘ .

  • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

    There appears to be an abundance of smaller, Midwest college towns. It might appear that that there were some prejudices (or omissions) in the somewhat limited and arbitrary rating factors. What about such factors as longevity, climate or income potential?

  • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

    There appears to be an abundance of smaller, Midwest college towns. It might appear that that there were some prejudices (or omissions) in the somewhat limited and arbitrary rating factors. What about such factors as longevity, climate or income potential?

    • http://ecofrugality.blogspot.com/ Amy Livingston

      I guess the problem with factoring in climate is that people’s preferences differ. You can’t just look at the average summertime high and winter low temperatures and conclude that the most temperate climates are “nicest.”

      • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

        True, but it is a fact that many “northerners” retire to southern locations (or at least more temperate climates) so there must be some prevalent general preferences for climate that need to be considered. Having left the Midwest in 1980 for Florida, I would be hard pressed to spend a winter in 8 of the 10 cities they chose.

        • ty

          Ugh. Florida just brings to mind muggy, humid and miserable, filled with old people and swarthy time share con artists with thinning, greasy hair slicked back with a gold incisor.

          • http://www.residentialmarketingblog.com/ Daniel R. Levitan

            Ty – Are you just generally negative and prejudiced or a true misanthrope?

          • Jonathan Mac Donald

            Ty, I think that you will be miserable anywhere! But, you clearly are opinionated without the knowledge to be so. Florida – really? Unless moving to the retirement areas I dont see inundation of retired people, I see young, international cosmopolitan people. More move here than any other state, young AND old. Try and make comments that you actually have enough experience or knowledge of. We have more beautiful “winter / dry” months than most cities have summer (which in Northern Climates summer has many hot, muggy days after a terrible winter). BUT, mentioning “Florida” as Disney World or retirement just shows you know nothing! Instead of looking for a city try and find a medication for your negativity and seemingly chronically depressed state!

          • festmatt5440

            Then leave ‘ , go to NEW YORK ” .

          • NoTofu

            You’ve obviously never been to Tampa. It’s warm and muggy, but you get used to it and there is so much to do, and the people are extremely friendly. Do you have a bias toward elderly people? You should hang out with more of them, as they’d teach you a few things about life.

        • Twinkiedawn

          I’ve lived in the Northeast, the South and I’ve lived in the Twin Cities of Minnesota for the last 37 years. We’ve traveled the US looking for something better for retirement because of the cold. So far, we haven’t seen anything that can top this area for cost of living, things to do such as theater, great restaurants, art and music. I’ve learned to never say never but I’m 99.99999% convinced that I wouldn’t move to the south, especially Florida – not ever.

        • festmatt5440

          wimp ‘ .

  • Adam Allerton

    Dumbest “study” ever. Seriously, anyone would rather live in Buffalo or Lubbock than in Orange County, California? Nobody would. No way. Nerdwallet fail

    • ty

      Only if they want a higher quality of life….OC, really? Is that your idea of the ideal place to live…. I always thought of it as kind of dumpy

      • http://www.theMadBagLady.wordpress.com/ Ms. M.

        Dumpy? Great weather, beautiful surroundings. Just too expensive for most people to be able to live there anymore. If you’d prefer to live in Buffalo or Lubbock then be my guest, please!

        People are leaving Buffalo so fast that it’s rare to see anyone under 50. I wonder what’ll happen in 20 years when the predominantly elderly population of Buffalo dies off. Maybe they’ll just shut the city down entirely and relocate the few remaining to FEMA camps ’cause there won’t be enough young people to work and run the city anymore.

  • Adam Allerton

    Dumbest “study” ever. Seriously, anyone would rather live in Buffalo or Lubbock than in Orange County, California? Nobody would. No way. Nerdwallet fail

  • Adam Allerton

    Dumbest “study” ever. Seriously, anyone would rather live in Buffalo or Lubbock than in Orange County, California? Nobody would. No way. Nerdwallet fail

    • ty

      Only if they want a higher quality of life….OC, really? Is that your idea of the ideal place to live…. I always thought of it as kind of dumpy

      • http://www.theMadBagLady.wordpress.com/ Ms. M.

        Dumpy? Great weather, beautiful surroundings. Just too expensive for most people to be able to live there anymore. If you’d prefer to live in Buffalo or Lubbock then be my guest, please!

        People are leaving Buffalo so fast that it’s rare to see anyone under 50. I wonder what’ll happen in 20 years when the predominantly elderly population of Buffalo dies off. Maybe they’ll just shut the city down entirely and relocate the few remaining to FEMA camps ’cause there won’t be enough young people to work and run the city anymore.

  • LonieMc

    Whoever
    put Lubbock on the list has never lived there. Dust storms (dust on, in
    and around everything), flood-causing thunderstorms, bone chilling
    winds, flat, very little to do, and backward attitudes. It is centrally
    located: it’s 5 hours from everywhere. Great sunsets and sunrises and
    Texas Tech, but that is about it.

    • Tawny Martinez

      I’m in Lubbock for Grad School and I can not wait to leave after I’m done with my program. hah

    • mmortal03

      They did not include weather and entertainment options on this, so, of course, that wouldn’t impact the results.

  • LonieMc

    Whoever
    put Lubbock on the list has never lived there. Dust storms (dust on, in
    and around everything), flood-causing thunderstorms, bone chilling
    winds, flat, very little to do, and backward attitudes. It is centrally
    located: it’s 5 hours from everywhere. Great sunsets and sunrises and
    Texas Tech, but that is about it.

  • LonieMc

    Whoever
    put Lubbock on the list has never lived there. Dust storms (dust on, in
    and around everything), flood-causing thunderstorms, bone chilling
    winds, flat, very little to do, and backward attitudes. It is centrally
    located: it’s 5 hours from everywhere. Great sunsets and sunrises and
    Texas Tech, but that is about it.

    • Tawny Martinez

      I’m in Lubbock for Grad School and I can not wait to leave after I’m done with my program. hah

    • mmortal03

      They did not include weather and entertainment options on this, so, of course, that wouldn’t impact the results.

  • dawterofliberty

    Hmmm for me, crime, and freedom from excessive laws would also weigh in…

    • ProfitOverLife

      If you want less crime, go to the blue states. If you want more lawlessness to be legal, go to the red states. Violent crime per capita is up to FOUR TIMES higher in some red states than the best blue states, and murder-if-you-feel-like-it is now LEGAL in some red states! So is poisoning the water supply–although they are starting to put new laws in red states prohibiting citizens from complaining about their poisoned water…

      • TVGizmo

        Like Chicago? Murder capital of the USA? Lot’s of laws, move there!

        • CandideThirtythree

          Chicago isn’t a state…. you did know that didn’t you Mrs. Palin?

          • festmatt5440

            It thinks it is a state ‘ ; it tries to ruin ‘ , ILL .

        • GetTheFactsFirst

          Chicago is not even close to having one of the highest homicide rates in the United States. Have you considered checking the facts before you post a comment? Here is a list from nieghborhoodscout.com of the 30 U.S. cities with highest rates of homicides per capita. You will find Chicago is NOT among them. Number 1 is highest homicide rate in the United States.

          The countdown for the Top 30 Murder Capitals of America:

          30 Atlanta, GA
          29 Richmond, VA
          28 Memphis, TN
          27 Montgomery, AL
          26 Cleveland, OH
          25 Compton, CA
          24 Philadelphia, PA
          23 San Bernardino, CA
          22 Miami Gardens, FL
          21 Macon, GA
          20 Kansas City, MO
          19 Little Rock, AR
          18 Stockton, CA
          17 Trenton, NJ
          16 Baton Rouge, LA
          15 Birmingham, AL
          14 Oakland, CA
          13 Youngstown, OH
          12 Newark, NJ
          11 Baltimore, MD
          10 St. Louis, MO
          9 Jackson, MS
          8 Wilmington, DE
          7 Fort Myers, FL
          6 Gary, IN
          5 Saginaw, MI
          4 New Orleans, LA
          3 Detroit, MI
          2 Flint, MI
          1 Camden, NJ

          Listing is from neighborhoodscout.com

        • GetTheFactsFirst

          Chicago is not even close to having one of the highest homicide rates in the United States. Have you considered checking the facts before you post a comment? Here is a list from neighborhoodscout.com of the 30 U.S. cities with highest rates of homicides per capita. You will find Chicago is NOT among them. Number 1 is highest homicide rate in the United States.

          The countdown for the Top 30 Murder Capitals of America:

          30 Atlanta, GA
          29 Richmond, VA
          28 Memphis, TN
          27 Montgomery, AL
          26 Cleveland, OH
          25 Compton, CA
          24 Philadelphia, PA
          23 San Bernardino, CA
          22 Miami Gardens, FL
          21 Macon, GA
          20 Kansas City, MO
          19 Little Rock, AR
          18 Stockton, CA
          17 Trenton, NJ
          16 Baton Rouge, LA
          15 Birmingham, AL
          14 Oakland, CA
          13 Youngstown, OH
          12 Newark, NJ
          11 Baltimore, MD
          10 St. Louis, MO
          9 Jackson, MS
          8 Wilmington, DE
          7 Fort Myers, FL
          6 Gary, IN
          5 Saginaw, MI
          4 New Orleans, LA
          3 Detroit, MI
          2 Flint, MI
          1 Camden, NJ
          Ranking is from neighborhoodscout.com

      • Zach Greenlee

        So california, the most populated state in the country must be some sort of anomaly then? That’s the problem with politically motivated generalizations… Just the facts, or cite your source.

      • NoTofu

        I don’t know where you get your misinformation from, but the truth is the exact opposite of what you stated. Overall, red states have the least amount of crime and the highest standards of living. Lower taxes, less crime per capita, lower unemployment, stable government and balanced budgets. Blue states fall well below the red states in these categories. Michigan, Illinois, New York, California and the northeast coastal states are all nearly broke, and the crime rates are going in the wrong direction.

  • dawterofliberty

    Hmmm for me, crime, and freedom from excessive laws would also weigh in…

  • dawterofliberty

    Hmmm for me, crime, and freedom from excessive laws would also weigh in…

    • ProfitOverLife

      If you want less crime, go to the blue states. If you want more lawlessness to be legal, go to the red states. Violent crime per capita is up to FOUR TIMES higher in some red states than the best blue states, and murder-if-you-feel-like-it is now LEGAL in some red states! So is poisoning the water supply–although they are starting to put new laws in red states prohibiting citizens from complaining about their poisoned water…

      • TVGizmo

        Like Chicago? Murder capital of the USA? Lot’s of laws, move there!

        • CandideThirtythree

          Chicago isn’t a state…. you did know that didn’t you Mrs. Palin?

          • festmatt5440

            It thinks it is a state ‘ ; it tries to ruin ‘ , ILL .

        • GetTheFactsFirst

          Chicago is not even close to having one of the highest homicide rates in the United States. Have you considered checking the facts before you post a comment? Here is a list from nieghborhoodscout.com of the 30 U.S. cities with highest rates of homicides per capita. You will find Chicago is NOT among them. Number 1 is highest homicide rate in the United States.

          The countdown for the Top 30 Murder Capitals of America:

          30 Atlanta, GA
          29 Richmond, VA
          28 Memphis, TN
          27 Montgomery, AL
          26 Cleveland, OH
          25 Compton, CA
          24 Philadelphia, PA
          23 San Bernardino, CA
          22 Miami Gardens, FL
          21 Macon, GA
          20 Kansas City, MO
          19 Little Rock, AR
          18 Stockton, CA
          17 Trenton, NJ
          16 Baton Rouge, LA
          15 Birmingham, AL
          14 Oakland, CA
          13 Youngstown, OH
          12 Newark, NJ
          11 Baltimore, MD
          10 St. Louis, MO
          9 Jackson, MS
          8 Wilmington, DE
          7 Fort Myers, FL
          6 Gary, IN
          5 Saginaw, MI
          4 New Orleans, LA
          3 Detroit, MI
          2 Flint, MI
          1 Camden, NJ

          Listing is from neighborhoodscout.com

        • GetTheFactsFirst

          Chicago is not even close to having one of the highest homicide rates in the United States. Have you considered checking the facts before you post a comment? Here is a list from neighborhoodscout.com of the 30 U.S. cities with highest rates of homicides per capita. You will find Chicago is NOT among them. Number 1 is highest homicide rate in the United States.

          The countdown for the Top 30 Murder Capitals of America:

          30 Atlanta, GA
          29 Richmond, VA
          28 Memphis, TN
          27 Montgomery, AL
          26 Cleveland, OH
          25 Compton, CA
          24 Philadelphia, PA
          23 San Bernardino, CA
          22 Miami Gardens, FL
          21 Macon, GA
          20 Kansas City, MO
          19 Little Rock, AR
          18 Stockton, CA
          17 Trenton, NJ
          16 Baton Rouge, LA
          15 Birmingham, AL
          14 Oakland, CA
          13 Youngstown, OH
          12 Newark, NJ
          11 Baltimore, MD
          10 St. Louis, MO
          9 Jackson, MS
          8 Wilmington, DE
          7 Fort Myers, FL
          6 Gary, IN
          5 Saginaw, MI
          4 New Orleans, LA
          3 Detroit, MI
          2 Flint, MI
          1 Camden, NJ
          Ranking is from neighborhoodscout.com

      • Zach Greenlee

        So california, the most populated state in the country must be some sort of anomaly then? That’s the problem with politically motivated generalizations… Just the facts, or cite your source.

      • NoTofu

        I don’t know where you get your misinformation from, but the truth is the exact opposite of what you stated. Overall, red states have the least amount of crime and the highest standards of living. Lower taxes, less crime per capita, lower unemployment, stable government and balanced budgets. Blue states fall well below the red states in these categories. Michigan, Illinois, New York, California and the northeast coastal states are all nearly broke, and the crime rates are going in the wrong direction.

  • Mary Lacey

    Some of these ‘best’ cities are also on the worst city list! I live in Yuma, AZ where it’s hotter than blue blazes in the summer time, but the beautiful winters counteract that. The unemployment is 30% which is horrible, but not quite true, since many people work ‘under the table’. Personally, I work on a military installation and have for 35 years. I’ll be retiring soon, don’t have a lot of money for travel, didn’t save as much as I should have, but with 6 kids, that was rather difficult! I came here as a teenager in 1971 from Maryland, and I’ll probably die here. It’s starting to get a little crazy because the city IS growing, it was a small town when I moved here, but I still love the beautiful winters where everyone else in the U.S. is shoveling snow and we’re wearing shorts!

    • ty

      Wow, way too much info and all kind of meaningless to anyone other than you.

      • dream21

        Wow, you have some “enlightened” comments for everyone. Talk about “meaningless”!!! You just go on and on….

  • Mary Lacey

    Some of these ‘best’ cities are also on the worst city list! I live in Yuma, AZ where it’s hotter than blue blazes in the summer time, but the beautiful winters counteract that. The unemployment is 30% which is horrible, but not quite true, since many people work ‘under the table’. Personally, I work on a military installation and have for 35 years. I’ll be retiring soon, don’t have a lot of money for travel, didn’t save as much as I should have, but with 6 kids, that was rather difficult! I came here as a teenager in 1971 from Maryland, and I’ll probably die here. It’s starting to get a little crazy because the city IS growing, it was a small town when I moved here, but I still love the beautiful winters where everyone else in the U.S. is shoveling snow and we’re wearing shorts!

  • Mary Lacey

    Some of these ‘best’ cities are also on the worst city list! I live in Yuma, AZ where it’s hotter than blue blazes in the summer time, but the beautiful winters counteract that. The unemployment is 30% which is horrible, but not quite true, since many people work ‘under the table’. Personally, I work on a military installation and have for 35 years. I’ll be retiring soon, don’t have a lot of money for travel, didn’t save as much as I should have, but with 6 kids, that was rather difficult! I came here as a teenager in 1971 from Maryland, and I’ll probably die here. It’s starting to get a little crazy because the city IS growing, it was a small town when I moved here, but I still love the beautiful winters where everyone else in the U.S. is shoveling snow and we’re wearing shorts!

    • ty

      Wow, way too much info and all kind of meaningless to anyone other than you.

      • dream21

        Wow, you have some “enlightened” comments for everyone. Talk about “meaningless”!!! You just go on and on….

  • Matt

    If you’ve ever been to Buffalo you know this study is bullshit.

  • ColoMark

    Colorado Springs may be beautiful, but the right wing politics suck the fun out of most everything.

    • ty

      If by “sucking the fun” you mean: Lower unemployment, lower cost of living, higher quality of life then I thank you for your surprisingly candid and honest confession about the real benefits of a conservative political system in action. If you meant something else, let’s just continue a policy of “dont ask, dont tell.”

  • ColoMark

    Colorado Springs may be beautiful, but the right wing politics suck the fun out of most everything.

  • ColoMark

    Colorado Springs may be beautiful, but the right wing politics suck the fun out of most everything.

    • ty

      If by “sucking the fun” you mean: Lower unemployment, lower cost of living, higher quality of life then I thank you for your surprisingly candid and honest confession about the real benefits of a conservative political system in action. If you meant something else, let’s just continue a policy of “dont ask, dont tell.”

  • imnalen

    Sorry. I prefer the Godless squalor of the Left Coast.

  • imnalen

    Sorry. I prefer the Godless squalor of the Left Coast.

  • imnalen

    Sorry. I prefer the Godless squalor of the Left Coast.

  • laslo

    With a few exceptions,if I woke up in any of those cities tomorrow, I’d shoot myself.

  • laslo

    With a few exceptions,if I woke up in any of those cities tomorrow, I’d shoot myself.

  • laslo

    With a few exceptions,if I woke up in any of those cities tomorrow, I’d shoot myself.

  • Anna

    You are so wrong when it comes to Texas and California. California expensive to buy a house yes, but there is so much more to do and see, not to mention the weather and people. Texas, every city in Texas has the worst quality of life. NOTHING to do but Malls and if your a Ranger fan go to a game. The weather for 6 months is disgusting, Hot and Humid. You cannot enjoy outdoor life for more than 5 minutes because of the heat. People sit at home and eat and do the same thing the next day. Work, Eat, go to the mall. I’m sorry I ever relocated here with my company. Jobs? sure if you are lucky and stay for more than 2 years. Lay offs are constant. Do not move to Texas, Do not. Unless of course you are nearing 60, ready to just sit and retire.

    • ty

      You sound ignorant, biased, and incorrect. Why would you think that the best places to live would be the ones with the most things to do?

      • lakshwadeep

        Only boring people get bored.

    • Jonathan Mac Donald

      I agree with you Anna! I was to move to Dallas for work, needless to say, after spending time there, with the heat, endless highway construction, and lack of culture, I quit my new job! NO WAY!

      • NoTofu

        I don’t know about Dallas, but Austin, TX is home to some of the best entertainment and culture I’ve seen in all of my travels, and I travel a lot. California is horrible anywhere south of San Francisco, but is beautiful from San Fran and north.

    • Eric E Gutierrez

      You are dumb… San Antonio, TX is BEAUTIFUL and we NEVER get earthquakes, mudslides, and forest fires often like certain parts of Cali do… And the weather is fantastic 8 months out of the year… If you are an educated professional you will find a long term job here just like anywhere else… Yes California is great, but only along the pacific coast line… Inner Cali is hotter than any part of Texas… And it is way too populated and way too expensive… Traffic is a NIGHTMARE and your freeways don’t have any exits with turnarounds, so you are screwed if you miss your exit… But other than that, yes Cali is fantastic… Probably the best weather (along the coast line) in the U.S… Some prety nice beaches as well… I’ll give you that…

    • Chris

      Quality of life is great in coastal California IF you can afford it. And IF you happen to live close to your workplace or work from home(in the case of L.A. with it’s traffic).

  • Anna

    You are so wrong when it comes to Texas and California. California expensive to buy a house yes, but there is so much more to do and see, not to mention the weather and people. Texas, every city in Texas has the worst quality of life. NOTHING to do but Malls and if your a Ranger fan go to a game. The weather for 6 months is disgusting, Hot and Humid. You cannot enjoy outdoor life for more than 5 minutes because of the heat. People sit at home and eat and do the same thing the next day. Work, Eat, go to the mall. I’m sorry I ever relocated here with my company. Jobs? sure if you are lucky and stay for more than 2 years. Lay offs are constant. Do not move to Texas, Do not. Unless of course you are nearing 60, ready to just sit and retire.

  • Anna

    You are so wrong when it comes to Texas and California. California expensive to buy a house yes, but there is so much more to do and see, not to mention the weather and people. Texas, every city in Texas has the worst quality of life. NOTHING to do but Malls and if your a Ranger fan go to a game. The weather for 6 months is disgusting, Hot and Humid. You cannot enjoy outdoor life for more than 5 minutes because of the heat. People sit at home and eat and do the same thing the next day. Work, Eat, go to the mall. I’m sorry I ever relocated here with my company. Jobs? sure if you are lucky and stay for more than 2 years. Lay offs are constant. Do not move to Texas, Do not. Unless of course you are nearing 60, ready to just sit and retire.

    • ty

      You sound ignorant, biased, and incorrect. Why would you think that the best places to live would be the ones with the most things to do?

      • lakshwadeep

        Only boring people get bored.

    • Jonathan Mac Donald

      I agree with you Anna! I was to move to Dallas for work, needless to say, after spending time there, with the heat, endless highway construction, and lack of culture, I quit my new job! NO WAY!

      • NoTofu

        I don’t know about Dallas, but Austin, TX is home to some of the best entertainment and culture I’ve seen in all of my travels, and I travel a lot. California is horrible anywhere south of San Francisco, but is beautiful from San Fran and north.

    • Eric E Gutierrez

      You are dumb… San Antonio, TX is BEAUTIFUL and we NEVER get earthquakes, mudslides, and forest fires often like certain parts of Cali do… And the weather is fantastic 8 months out of the year… If you are an educated professional you will find a long term job here just like anywhere else… Yes California is great, but only along the pacific coast line… Inner Cali is hotter than any part of Texas… And it is way too populated and way too expensive… Traffic is a NIGHTMARE and your freeways don’t have any exits with turnarounds, so you are screwed if you miss your exit… But other than that, yes Cali is fantastic… Probably the best weather (along the coast line) in the U.S… Some prety nice beaches as well… I’ll give you that…

    • Chris

      Quality of life is great in coastal California IF you can afford it. And IF you happen to live close to your workplace or work from home(in the case of L.A. with it’s traffic).

  • Robert Hoffman

    San Diego CA. has the best quality of life. But don’t tell everyone because we don’t want you.

    • ty

      No, it doesn’t. Read the article again.

    • butterfly1980

      Too many blacks and Mexicans.. I want to live where there white people are the majority.

    • Zach Greenlee

      Having lived in san Diego and Encinitas, I couldn’t agree more. It is paradise for families, especially some of the north county cities. Finding your niche there if you’re from somewhere else is the difficult part though. Once you move away, you’re lucky if you ever make it back. :)

  • Robert Hoffman

    San Diego CA. has the best quality of life. But don’t tell everyone because we don’t want you.

  • Robert Hoffman

    San Diego CA. has the best quality of life. But don’t tell everyone because we don’t want you.

    • ty

      No, it doesn’t. Read the article again.

    • butterfly1980

      Too many blacks and Mexicans.. I want to live where there white people are the majority.

    • Zach Greenlee

      Having lived in san Diego and Encinitas, I couldn’t agree more. It is paradise for families, especially some of the north county cities. Finding your niche there if you’re from somewhere else is the difficult part though. Once you move away, you’re lucky if you ever make it back. :)

  • JCS

    It seems the most important factor in determining the best quality of life city is the percent of the population with health care coverage. Funny too, that Detroit came in as 13th worst, right next to Dallas at 12th worst. Another dumb survey the media will use as a filler piece.

  • JCS

    It seems the most important factor in determining the best quality of life city is the percent of the population with health care coverage. Funny too, that Detroit came in as 13th worst, right next to Dallas at 12th worst. Another dumb survey the media will use as a filler piece.

  • JCS

    It seems the most important factor in determining the best quality of life city is the percent of the population with health care coverage. Funny too, that Detroit came in as 13th worst, right next to Dallas at 12th worst. Another dumb survey the media will use as a filler piece.

  • Robert Hoffman

    TY yes it is . I live here.

  • Robert Hoffman

    TY yes it is . I live here.

  • Robert Hoffman

    TY yes it is . I live here.

  • Shieryl

    The median annual rent of median income for BATON ROUGE, LA is
    incorrect. We searched and searched for a DECENT place (lower crime in
    the neighborhood) that was within 25% of income. We ended up paying
    29.2% of our total income. This amount is not in one of the best
    apartment buildings at all. That percentage of rent would be far more
    here!!

  • Shieryl

    The median annual rent of median income for BATON ROUGE, LA is
    incorrect. We searched and searched for a DECENT place (lower crime in
    the neighborhood) that was within 25% of income. We ended up paying
    29.2% of our total income. This amount is not in one of the best
    apartment buildings at all. That percentage of rent would be far more
    here!!

  • Shieryl

    The median annual rent of median income for BATON ROUGE, LA is
    incorrect. We searched and searched for a DECENT place (lower crime in
    the neighborhood) that was within 25% of income. We ended up paying
    29.2% of our total income. This amount is not in one of the best
    apartment buildings at all. That percentage of rent would be far more
    here!!

  • plukasiak

    wow…what a massive pile of crap.
    Any survey that includes only “economic” factors in determining quality of life is inherently ridiculous. As many others have noted, CLIMATE is a crucial factor for quality of life (and by ignoring the costs of heating/cooling a home in the less temperate cities, the survey demonstrates its own inability to include crucial relevant economic data–rent may be low in Minnesota and Nebraska, but the cost of heat sends housing prices much, much higher.)

    Also ignored were crime rates, the public transportation system, access to culture…the list goes on and on.
    This survey has nothing to do with ‘quality of life’ for the overall population– it might have some value if used to determine which cities have the highest percentage of people under economic stress, but that’s about it.

  • plukasiak

    wow…what a massive pile of crap.
    Any survey that includes only “economic” factors in determining quality of life is inherently ridiculous. As many others have noted, CLIMATE is a crucial factor for quality of life (and by ignoring the costs of heating/cooling a home in the less temperate cities, the survey demonstrates its own inability to include crucial relevant economic data–rent may be low in Minnesota and Nebraska, but the cost of heat sends housing prices much, much higher.)

    Also ignored were crime rates, the public transportation system, access to culture…the list goes on and on.
    This survey has nothing to do with ‘quality of life’ for the overall population– it might have some value if used to determine which cities have the highest percentage of people under economic stress, but that’s about it.

  • plukasiak

    wow…what a massive pile of crap.
    Any survey that includes only “economic” factors in determining quality of life is inherently ridiculous. As many others have noted, CLIMATE is a crucial factor for quality of life (and by ignoring the costs of heating/cooling a home in the less temperate cities, the survey demonstrates its own inability to include crucial relevant economic data–rent may be low in Minnesota and Nebraska, but the cost of heat sends housing prices much, much higher.)

    Also ignored were crime rates, the public transportation system, access to culture…the list goes on and on.
    This survey has nothing to do with ‘quality of life’ for the overall population– it might have some value if used to determine which cities have the highest percentage of people under economic stress, but that’s about it.

    • Teopa Sano-Reve

      precisely. if economic stress were THE factor in quality of life this survey Might have a voice, but as you said, utility costs for poor weather locales and crime rates, culture, and transportation are very significant factors for most people as well.

  • JoAnn Sandifer Moyano

    Madison, Wisconsin as #1, and Miami, Florida as #100…. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA.. Give me paradise anywhere in Florida any day… I wouldn’t live anywhere else..

  • JoAnn Sandifer Moyano

    Madison, Wisconsin as #1, and Miami, Florida as #100…. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA.. Give me paradise anywhere in Florida any day… I wouldn’t live anywhere else..

  • JoAnn Sandifer Moyano

    Madison, Wisconsin as #1, and Miami, Florida as #100…. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA.. Give me paradise anywhere in Florida any day… I wouldn’t live anywhere else..

  • jimman

    It’s a simple survey really, the largest cities score the lowest because they have more people and therefore more traffic, more crime, and more unemployment. There is no science here, it’s simple statistics. Quality of life is subjective anyway. If I have a good job and can afford to live in a nice area nearby my job then I’ll take awesome-weathered #100 Miami over I-can’t-drive-my-car-5-months-out-of-the-year-because-of-all-the-damn-snow #1 Madison any day of the week.

  • jimman

    It’s a simple survey really, the largest cities score the lowest because they have more people and therefore more traffic, more crime, and more unemployment. There is no science here, it’s simple statistics. Quality of life is subjective anyway. If I have a good job and can afford to live in a nice area nearby my job then I’ll take awesome-weathered #100 Miami over I-can’t-drive-my-car-5-months-out-of-the-year-because-of-all-the-damn-snow #1 Madison any day of the week.

  • jimman

    It’s a simple survey really, the largest cities score the lowest because they have more people and therefore more traffic, more crime, and more unemployment. There is no science here, it’s simple statistics. Quality of life is subjective anyway. If I have a good job and can afford to live in a nice area nearby my job then I’ll take awesome-weathered #100 Miami over I-can’t-drive-my-car-5-months-out-of-the-year-because-of-all-the-damn-snow #1 Madison any day of the week.

  • GW

    The study ignores factors that many people consider important including climate, outdoor recreation, and cultural amenities.

  • GW

    The study ignores factors that many people consider important including climate, outdoor recreation, and cultural amenities.

  • GW

    The study ignores factors that many people consider important including climate, outdoor recreation, and cultural amenities.

  • HarryJohnsonthe3rd

    Buffalo? If you are a fool you like it.

  • HarryJohnsonthe3rd

    Buffalo? If you are a fool you like it.

  • HarryJohnsonthe3rd

    Buffalo? If you are a fool you like it.

  • Zach Greenlee

    I’ve been to only a handful of these cities, but I don’t think these metrics are actually adequate for measuring quality of life. I think the decision is much more complex and Forbes has done a better job applying metrics such as mean job and economy growth, crime rates, percent of the population that is incarcerated, high school completion rates, institution of higher learning numbers and quality, community infrastructure, physician to patient ratios, etc. there is a lot more that goes into making these lists than this simple metric that they’ve devised here. I’d suggest looking into city-data and other more reputable and researched sources.

  • Zach Greenlee

    I’ve been to only a handful of these cities, but I don’t think these metrics are actually adequate for measuring quality of life. I think the decision is much more complex and Forbes has done a better job applying metrics such as mean job and economy growth, crime rates, percent of the population that is incarcerated, high school completion rates, institution of higher learning numbers and quality, community infrastructure, physician to patient ratios, etc. there is a lot more that goes into making these lists than this simple metric that they’ve devised here. I’d suggest looking into city-data and other more reputable and researched sources.

  • Zach Greenlee

    I’ve been to only a handful of these cities, but I don’t think these metrics are actually adequate for measuring quality of life. I think the decision is much more complex and Forbes has done a better job applying metrics such as mean job and economy growth, crime rates, percent of the population that is incarcerated, high school completion rates, institution of higher learning numbers and quality, community infrastructure, physician to patient ratios, etc. there is a lot more that goes into making these lists than this simple metric that they’ve devised here. I’d suggest looking into city-data and other more reputable and researched sources.

    • Susy Q

      Well said.

  • Jessica Lynn Vanderklei

    this is interesting

  • Jessica Lynn Vanderklei

    this is interesting

  • Jessica Lynn Vanderklei

    this is interesting

  • Sencho

    The six criteria used aren’t of equal importance nor are independent of each other – so can’t be weighted evenly. Doing so not only makes this meaningless but exposes the whole thing as just rather sophomoric click-bait.

  • Sencho

    The six criteria used aren’t of equal importance nor are independent of each other – so can’t be weighted evenly. Doing so not only makes this meaningless but exposes the whole thing as just rather sophomoric click-bait.

  • Sencho

    The six criteria used aren’t of equal importance nor are independent of each other – so can’t be weighted evenly. Doing so not only makes this meaningless but exposes the whole thing as just rather sophomoric click-bait.

  • Gavin Gryte

    What a bunch of idiots. 2 of the top 5 are some of the worst cities I’ve ever been in (I’ve been to most major metropolitan areas in the US). I would never live in Lincoln, NE again. They are inexpensive cause nobody wants to live there!

  • Gavin Gryte

    What a bunch of idiots. 2 of the top 5 are some of the worst cities I’ve ever been in (I’ve been to most major metropolitan areas in the US). I would never live in Lincoln, NE again. They are inexpensive cause nobody wants to live there!

  • Gavin Gryte

    What a bunch of idiots. 2 of the top 5 are some of the worst cities I’ve ever been in (I’ve been to most major metropolitan areas in the US). I would never live in Lincoln, NE again. They are inexpensive cause nobody wants to live there!

    • Susy Q

      Love you reply. Short and sweet

  • Gavin Gryte

    The criteria in this study is so flawed. They didn’t include average income for employed people! Nor fun things that you can do in Lincoln Nebraska!…the WORST town I’ve ever lived in out of over 20. This study is ideal for the penny wise and pound foolish and for really boring people who can watch cable 40 hours a week no matter where they live. (Oh yeah, and how about aesthetics?) They forgot to say, “Study designed by Joseph Stalin”

  • Gavin Gryte

    The criteria in this study is so flawed. They didn’t include average income for employed people! Nor fun things that you can do in Lincoln Nebraska!…the WORST town I’ve ever lived in out of over 20. This study is ideal for the penny wise and pound foolish and for really boring people who can watch cable 40 hours a week no matter where they live. (Oh yeah, and how about aesthetics?) They forgot to say, “Study designed by Joseph Stalin”

  • Gavin Gryte

    The criteria in this study is so flawed. They didn’t include average income for employed people! Nor fun things that you can do in Lincoln Nebraska!…the WORST town I’ve ever lived in out of over 20. This study is ideal for the penny wise and pound foolish and for really boring people who can watch cable 40 hours a week no matter where they live. (Oh yeah, and how about aesthetics?) They forgot to say, “Study designed by Joseph Stalin”

  • NoTofu

    I’m surprised Austin, TX isn’t in the top 10 list. Living in Minnesota, I can attest that it has it’s nice cities, but the taxes are horrendous, the roads and infrastructure are falling apart, and the immigration of welfare recipients are destroying this once-great state. Where do you think the recent terrorist breeding grounds are located? If you said Minnesota, you’d be correct.

  • NoTofu

    I’m surprised Austin, TX isn’t in the top 10 list. Living in Minnesota, I can attest that it has it’s nice cities, but the taxes are horrendous, the roads and infrastructure are falling apart, and the immigration of welfare recipients are destroying this once-great state. Where do you think the recent terrorist breeding grounds are located? If you said Minnesota, you’d be correct.

  • NoTofu

    I’m surprised Austin, TX isn’t in the top 10 list. Living in Minnesota, I can attest that it has it’s nice cities, but the taxes are horrendous, the roads and infrastructure are falling apart, and the immigration of welfare recipients are destroying this once-great state. Where do you think the recent terrorist breeding grounds are located? If you said Minnesota, you’d be correct.

  • marilyn

    I moved to Florida and moved back to Pittsburgh happily. Florida was hell and very boring. No place for middle class either. Pittsburgh is rather nice, inexpensive and the weather isn’t that bad except for a few months out of the year. People are nice, lots of things to do, cost of living low, you can drive out of state or the country if you want to go away for the weekend. I could be in Toronto in 2.5 hours and Dc in 3.5.
    If you are rich, a selfish person or old then move to Florida. Its nice for vacation but not for living. Who cares if the weathers nice if you have to worry about getting evicted because most of your money goes to rent. I made 50,000 a year there and people looked at me with their snotty little noses like i was some bum. People love to flaunt their wealth in front of you, theres nothing to do unless you can afford to go to Disney every weekend or want to go to the beach and listen to all the tourist talk loudly around you. You can’t even read a book.Florida is a transient state. Most people don’t stay.

  • marilyn

    I moved to Florida and moved back to Pittsburgh happily. Florida was hell and very boring. No place for middle class either. Pittsburgh is rather nice, inexpensive and the weather isn’t that bad except for a few months out of the year. People are nice, lots of things to do, cost of living low, you can drive out of state or the country if you want to go away for the weekend. I could be in Toronto in 2.5 hours and Dc in 3.5.
    If you are rich, a selfish person or old then move to Florida. Its nice for vacation but not for living. Who cares if the weathers nice if you have to worry about getting evicted because most of your money goes to rent. I made 50,000 a year there and people looked at me with their snotty little noses like i was some bum. People love to flaunt their wealth in front of you, theres nothing to do unless you can afford to go to Disney every weekend or want to go to the beach and listen to all the tourist talk loudly around you. You can’t even read a book.Florida is a transient state. Most people don’t stay.

  • marilyn

    I moved to Florida and moved back to Pittsburgh happily. Florida was hell and very boring. No place for middle class either. Pittsburgh is rather nice, inexpensive and the weather isn’t that bad except for a few months out of the year. People are nice, lots of things to do, cost of living low, you can drive out of state or the country if you want to go away for the weekend. I could be in Toronto in 2.5 hours and Dc in 3.5.
    If you are rich, a selfish person or old then move to Florida. Its nice for vacation but not for living. Who cares if the weathers nice if you have to worry about getting evicted because most of your money goes to rent. I made 50,000 a year there and people looked at me with their snotty little noses like i was some bum. People love to flaunt their wealth in front of you, theres nothing to do unless you can afford to go to Disney every weekend or want to go to the beach and listen to all the tourist talk loudly around you. You can’t even read a book.Florida is a transient state. Most people don’t stay.

    • Cliff Weng

      I like Pittsburgh too! but driving to Toronto in 2.5 hours …. how did you do it?

  • Alan Dale Brown

    What’s wrong up with this survey is that if you have a job where you work reasonable hours, with a good enough income and benefits, that’s near where you live – you can live any of these places, and other things matter more, like weather, culture, outdoor activities, etc. This survey measures your chances of being financially comfortable in each of these cities, not so much how pleasant the city itself is.

  • Alan Dale Brown

    What’s wrong up with this survey is that if you have a job where you work reasonable hours, with a good enough income and benefits, that’s near where you live – you can live any of these places, and other things matter more, like weather, culture, outdoor activities, etc. This survey measures your chances of being financially comfortable in each of these cities, not so much how pleasant the city itself is.

  • Alan Dale Brown

    What’s wrong up with this survey is that if you have a job where you work reasonable hours, with a good enough income and benefits, that’s near where you live – you can live any of these places, and other things matter more, like weather, culture, outdoor activities, etc. This survey measures your chances of being financially comfortable in each of these cities, not so much how pleasant the city itself is.

    • Teopa Sano-Reve

      AMEN. This survey is misleading in that its criteria is so narrow. You need to read the fine print to make sure you understand what they are touting as ‘quality of life’ I am not discounting the significance of these factors they used, only saying that true quality of life includes more.

      • Teopa Sano-Reve

        I lived in a few of these cities and although i had an adequate life economically (in Wichita, for example) i was bored STupID.

  • thinker5

    This survey may be a republican’s wet dream, but it is FAR FROM TRUE……I find it really telling that MOST of your “best cities” have a low minority population, working conditions that favor the factories and companies, and what’s worse, a middle class that suffers under the thumb of their respective governors, who like to cut the middle class in favor of said companies. I don’t know who does these “surveys”, but THANK YOU FOR A YEAR END LAUGH!!!!

    • modern6

      You do realize that all most southern states are republican and also have the highest percentages of blacks including Mississippi which has the highest percentage of blacks in the US. By far the majority of the cities on this list are democrat/liberal. Liberals tend to navigate towards highly white cities like Portland where I live and not black cities like Memphis. Also, you will never change anything while focused on it’s opposite. I suggest a few lessons in metaphysics.

  • thinker5

    This survey may be a republican’s wet dream, but it is FAR FROM TRUE……I find it really telling that MOST of your “best cities” have a low minority population, working conditions that favor the factories and companies, and what’s worse, a middle class that suffers under the thumb of their respective governors, who like to cut the middle class in favor of said companies. I don’t know who does these “surveys”, but THANK YOU FOR A YEAR END LAUGH!!!!

  • thinker5

    This survey may be a republican’s wet dream, but it is FAR FROM TRUE……I find it really telling that MOST of your “best cities” have a low minority population, working conditions that favor the factories and companies, and what’s worse, a middle class that suffers under the thumb of their respective governors, who like to cut the middle class in favor of said companies. I don’t know who does these “surveys”, but THANK YOU FOR A YEAR END LAUGH!!!!

    • modern6

      You do realize that all most southern states are republican and also have the highest percentages of blacks including Mississippi which has the highest percentage of blacks in the US. By far the majority of the cities on this list are democrat/liberal. Liberals tend to navigate towards highly white cities like Portland where I live and not black cities like Memphis. Also, you will never change anything while focused on it’s opposite. I suggest a few lessons in metaphysics.

  • Cliff Weng

    I like Pittsburgh too! but driving to Toronto in 2.5 hours …. how did you do it?

  • Cliff Weng

    I like Pittsburgh too! but driving to Toronto in 2.5 hours …. how did you do it?

  • H. Lynn

    Raleigh is very nice. However, politicians pad their wallets while freezing teacher pay for 11 out of 20 years. The teacher pay is 50th in the nation. Many of the aging schools are full of mold and mildew.

  • H. Lynn

    Raleigh is very nice. However, politicians pad their wallets while freezing teacher pay for 11 out of 20 years. The teacher pay is 50th in the nation. Many of the aging schools are full of mold and mildew.

  • H. Lynn

    Raleigh is very nice. However, politicians pad their wallets while freezing teacher pay for 11 out of 20 years. The teacher pay is 50th in the nation. Many of the aging schools are full of mold and mildew.

  • skyharbor101

    I agree with most of this list and have been to most places. All of Florida should be in the top 10, that is the worst state in the US. Ugly wires everywhere, nothing of quality unless you think strip malls everywhere is a sign of having arrived. Hot and humid most of the year, bugs, and smelly people. Ever go into a store or market and stand in line next to someone who has been outside, running from their AC home to their AC car to the store? P-yew!! The whole state stinks….I lived there for 4 months and could not take the place, the people and lack of service. Everyone looks so sloppy walking around because it is so hot…I have seen some ugly fat people who have not business wearing shorts and tank tops…but they do…UG-LEE!!

  • skyharbor101

    I agree with most of this list and have been to most places. All of Florida should be in the top 10, that is the worst state in the US. Ugly wires everywhere, nothing of quality unless you think strip malls everywhere is a sign of having arrived. Hot and humid most of the year, bugs, and smelly people. Ever go into a store or market and stand in line next to someone who has been outside, running from their AC home to their AC car to the store? P-yew!! The whole state stinks….I lived there for 4 months and could not take the place, the people and lack of service. Everyone looks so sloppy walking around because it is so hot…I have seen some ugly fat people who have not business wearing shorts and tank tops…but they do…UG-LEE!!

  • skyharbor101

    I agree with most of this list and have been to most places. All of Florida should be in the top 10, that is the worst state in the US. Ugly wires everywhere, nothing of quality unless you think strip malls everywhere is a sign of having arrived. Hot and humid most of the year, bugs, and smelly people. Ever go into a store or market and stand in line next to someone who has been outside, running from their AC home to their AC car to the store? P-yew!! The whole state stinks….I lived there for 4 months and could not take the place, the people and lack of service. Everyone looks so sloppy walking around because it is so hot…I have seen some ugly fat people who have not business wearing shorts and tank tops…but they do…UG-LEE!!

  • http://batman-news.com Changed1

    I’ve lived in 4 states: 2 in the Midwest, 1 on the East Coast, and finally, Florida. I should have moved to Florida years ago. I love the weather, all year round. I live in a beach town so it stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter than Orlando. Florida has plenty to do, even if you’re not in to tourist traps. My property taxes are significantly lower than anywhere I’ve lived. I don’t pay state income tax. My income isn’t eaten by my mortgage. I have great neighbors, and the ones I am least fond of are snow birds who will be gone by the end of April. Best of all, every weekend is a vacation. Ahhhhh……………

  • http://batman-news.com Changed1

    I’ve lived in 4 states: 2 in the Midwest, 1 on the East Coast, and finally, Florida. I should have moved to Florida years ago. I love the weather, all year round. I live in a beach town so it stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter than Orlando. Florida has plenty to do, even if you’re not in to tourist traps. My property taxes are significantly lower than anywhere I’ve lived. I don’t pay state income tax. My income isn’t eaten by my mortgage. I have great neighbors, and the ones I am least fond of are snow birds who will be gone by the end of April. Best of all, every weekend is a vacation. Ahhhhh……………

  • http://batman-news.com Changed1

    I’ve lived in 4 states: 2 in the Midwest, 1 on the East Coast, and finally, Florida. I should have moved to Florida years ago. I love the weather, all year round. I live in a beach town so it stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter than Orlando. Florida has plenty to do, even if you’re not in to tourist traps. My property taxes are significantly lower than anywhere I’ve lived. I don’t pay state income tax. My income isn’t eaten by my mortgage. I have great neighbors, and the ones I am least fond of are snow birds who will be gone by the end of April. Best of all, every weekend is a vacation. Ahhhhh……………

  • Susy Q

    Love you reply. Short and sweet

  • Susy Q

    Love you reply. Short and sweet

  • Susy Q

    Well said.

  • Susy Q

    Well said.

  • Teopa Sano-Reve

    AMEN. This survey is misleading in that its criteria is so narrow. You need to read the fine print to make sure you understand what they are touting as ‘quality of life’ I am not discounting the significance of these factors they used, only saying that true quality of life includes more.

    • Teopa Sano-Reve

      I lived in a few of these cities and although i had an adequate life economically (in Wichita, for example) i was bored STupID.

  • Teopa Sano-Reve

    AMEN. This survey is misleading in that its criteria is so narrow. You need to read the fine print to make sure you understand what they are touting as ‘quality of life’ I am not discounting the significance of these factors they used, only saying that true quality of life includes more.

  • Teopa Sano-Reve

    precisely. if economic stress were THE factor in quality of life this survey Might have a voice, but as you said, utility costs for poor weather locales and crime rates, culture, and transportation are very significant factors for most people as well.

  • Teopa Sano-Reve

    precisely. if economic stress were THE factor in quality of life this survey Might have a voice, but as you said, utility costs for poor weather locales and crime rates, culture, and transportation are very significant factors for most people as well.

  • Bart Dumpcake

    Been around the world and Boston, MA (city and subs) are my choice.

  • Bart Dumpcake

    Been around the world and Boston, MA (city and subs) are my choice.