529 Contribution Limits for 2024: Max Contribution by State

529 contribution limits are set by each state plan and generally apply a total account limit per beneficiary. They range from $235,000 to upward of $500,000.
Arielle O'Shea
By Arielle O'Shea 
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The contribution limits for 529 plans generally aren't discussed that often, for good reason: They're typically quite high, and many families won't contribute enough to meet them.

That's because, unlike retirement accounts like IRAs or 401(k)s, the IRS doesn't set specific contribution limits for 529 college savings plans. Instead, the agency simply notes that the amount contributed to a 529 (also called a qualified tuition program, or QTP) can't be more than what's needed to pay for qualified education expenses

Internal Revenue Service. Tax Benefits for Education. Accessed Mar 22, 2024.
. States do set maximum limits, which range from $235,000 to $575,000.

Keep in mind that limits tend to be the total amount you can contribute per beneficiary, but read the 529 plan's contribution limit documentation for specifics, as rules may vary.

529 contribution limits by state

State

Contribution limit

Alabama

$475,000

Alaska

$550,000

Arizona

$575,000

Arkansas

$500,000

California

$529,000

Colorado

$500,000

Connecticut

$550,000

Delaware

$350,000

Florida

$418,000

Georgia

$235,000

Hawaii

$305,000

Idaho

$500,000

Illinois

$500,000

Indiana

$450,000

Iowa

$420,000

Kansas

$475,000

Kentucky

$450,000

Louisiana

$500,000

Maine

$520,000

Maryland

$500,000

Massachusetts

$500,000

Michigan

$500,000

Minnesota

$425,000

Mississippi

$235,000

Missouri

$550,000

Montana

$396,000

Nebraska

$500,000

Nevada

$500,000

New Hampshire

$553,098

New Jersey

$305,000

New Mexico

$500,000

New York

$520,000

North Carolina

$550,000

North Dakota

$269,000

Ohio

$541,000

Oklahoma

$450,000

Oregon

$400,000

Pennsylvania

$511,758

Rhode Island

$520,000

South Carolina

$540,000

South Dakota

$350,000

Tennessee

$350,000

Texas

$500,000

Utah

$560,000

Vermont

$550,000

Virginia

$550,000

Washington

$500,000

Washington D.C.

$500,000

West Virginia

$550,000

Wisconsin

$567,500

Wyoming

N/A

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529 contributions and the gift tax

One thing to keep in mind: 529 contributions may trigger gift tax consequences if you earmark more than the gift tax exclusion ($18,000 for 2024) for any one beneficiary in a tax year. This exclusion is an individual one, meaning a married couple giving jointly could gift up to $36,000 to one beneficiary in 2024.

» Feeling generous? Learn about the gift tax

The vast majority of people do not need to worry about this, as they are unlikely to hit the lifetime exclusion, which is currently $13.61 million. However, if you exceed the annual exclusion, you may need to file a gift tax return.

Superfunding 529s

One strategy for those who want to contribute more than the annual exclusion is known as superfunding: You can front-load a 529 by making up to five years' worth of contributions at one time, then treat the contribution as if it were made over five years.

This means you could put $90,000 into a 529 account for one beneficiary today — five times the current $18,000 annual gift tax exclusion. The IRS allows you to do this for each beneficiary if you're contributing to 529s for multiple people

Internal Revenue Service. Instructions for form 709. Accessed Mar 25, 2024.
.

The benefit of this strategy, if you have the money available, is that you'll give your contributions longer to grow and earn investment income.

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