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5 Things to Know About the Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard

Nov. 19, 2018
Balance Transfer Credit Cards, Credit Cards, Low Interest and No Fee Credit Cards, Rewards Credit Cards
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While it’s not the flashiest of rewards cards, the Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card offers a straightforward rewards program, a $0 annual fee, a low ongoing interest rate and benefits for union members.

You can also show your union affiliation by electing to have your union’s logo on your card (many logos, but not all, are available to choose from).

It shares many of the same features as the ABOC Platinum Rewards Card, but you must be a union member or “supporter” — which the application does not define — and have good to excellent credit to qualify for the Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card.

Here are five helpful things to know about this card:

1. Earning points is easy

Earn 1 point per dollar on all purchases, and accelerate your point earning by shopping through the Amalgamated Bank of Chicago rewards site or using your card at participating retailers. Periodically, there are promotions that also allow you to earn more. For example, the card’s website says that through Dec. 31, 2018, you can get 3 rewards points per dollar on qualifying grocery and drugstore purchases made with your Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card. You must register your card at ABOCrewards.com to participate.

The Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card also offers a sign-up bonus: Earn $150 statement credit after you spend $1,200 on purchases within the first 90 days from account opening. Also, there’s no cap on what you can earn, and as long as your card is open, your points don’t expire.

2. You have lots of options when redeeming points

Redeem your points through the rewards portal at ABOCrewards.com for statement credits, travel, gift cards and merchandise. You can also gift points to other ABOC members.

One possible downside: Point values vary depending on what you choose to redeem them for, and you can’t see specific redemption options until you’re a card member and can register your card on the rewards portal.

3. It offers union member-friendly benefits

The Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card offers a unique benefit for union members that allows you to skip one or more minimum payments if:

  • You are on a union-sanctioned strike for at least 30 days and your union notifies the credit card issuer of this.
  • Your union has chosen “no-pay” option months.

Keep in mind that interest will still accrue on your unpaid balance even if you’re allowed to skip a minimum payment. However, you won’t be charged a late fee.

4. The APR is low

New cardholders can enjoy 0% Intro APR for 12 months on Purchase and Balance Transfers, and then the ongoing APR of 11.50% Variable. This is one of the lowest ongoing interest rates available for a card that also offers a 0% intro APR period, making it ideal if you plan to carry a balance beyond the first year.

Looking for other low-interest options or cards with 0% intro APR periods? We’ve got you covered.

5. It offers protection for your purchases

If an item’s price goes down after you buy it, Mastercard’s price protection feature can help. If you paid for an item with your Amalgamated Bank of Chicago Union Strong Mastercard® Credit Card and the price decreases within 60 days of purchase, you can file a claim for reimbursement of the difference — a helpful feature if you happen to make a large purchase right before a holiday sale, and a perk that’s getting harder to find.

You can also protect your purchases beyond the manufacturer’s warranty with the card’s extended warranty feature.

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