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High-Dividend Stocks: 25 Stocks That Pay High Yields

Dividend stocks are often evaluated on their dividend yield. Below are 25 high-dividend stocks.
July 9, 2019
Investing, Investing Strategy, Investments
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When you buy a stock, you buy partial ownership in a company. Dividend stocks pay out one of the fruits of that ownership: Dividends — your share of the company’s profits — to investors on a regular basis.

Dividend stocks are frequently judged by their dividend yield, which is the amount of the company’s annual dividend divided by the stock’s share price. Investors often search for stocks with high dividend yields, though a stock’s dividend yield will fluctuate as the company’s share price and dividend payouts change.

» Get the basics: How to invest in dividend stocks

Income from high-dividend stocks can be reinvested or used as cash flow. Cash dividends will vary by company, but they are often under $1 per share. Most companies pay dividends quarterly.

List of high-dividend stocks

Below is a list of 25 high-dividend stocks, ordered by dividend yield. The dividend shown below is the amount paid per period, not annually.

SymbolCompany NameDividendDividend Yield
HPTHospitality Properties Trust$0.548.55%
BXMTBlackstone Mortgage Trust Inc.$0.626.94%
PACWPacWest Bancorp$0.606.37%
OXYOccidental Petroleum Corp.$0.786.33%
ENBEnbridge Inc.$0.746.10%
ABBVAbbVie Inc.$1.076.01%
CVICVR Energy Inc.$0.755.82%
DOWDow Holdings Inc.$0.705.77%
STXSeagate Technology Plc.$0.635.41%
BCEBCE Inc.$0.795.19%
UVVUniversal Corp.$0.765.01%
BNSThe Bank of Nova Scotia$0.874.89%
LYBLyondellBasell Industries NV$1.054.81%
IBMInternational Business Machines Corp.$1.624.61%
TUTELUS Corp.$0.564.56%
DUKDuke Energy Corp.$0.934.22%
CLBCore Laboratories NV$0.554.17%
VZVerizon Communications Inc.$0.604.16%
BMOBank of Montreal$1.034.10%
PRKPark National Corp.$1.014.10%
KKellogg Co.$0.564.04%
PRUPrudential Financial Inc.$1.003.93%
RRyder System Inc.$0.543.89%
CVXChevron Corp.$1.193.85%
AGMFederal Agricultural Mortgage Corp.$0.703.79%

Stock data current as of July 9, 2019.

» Looking to buy stocks? Here’s how to open a brokerage account

Evaluating dividend-paying stocks

Bigger is not always better when it comes to dividend yields.

Dividend yields over 4% should be carefully scrutinized; those over 10% tread firmly into risky territory. (You might notice we didn’t include any above this threshold on our list above.) Among other things, a too-high dividend yield can indicate the payout is unsustainable, or that investors are selling the stock, driving down its share price and increasing the dividend yield as a result.

To evaluate a high-dividend stock, start by comparing the dividend yields among its peers. If a company’s dividend yield is much higher than that of similar companies, it could be a red flag. At the very least, it’s worth additional research into the company and the safety of the dividend.

Then look at the stock’s payout ratio, which tells you how much of the company’s income is going toward dividends. A payout ratio that is too high — generally above 80%, though it can vary by industry — means the company is putting a large percentage of its income into paying dividends.

Why would that be bad? For one thing, money going to investors in the form of dividends is money that’s not being reinvested in the company’s growth. But a high payout ratio could also mean the dividend is unsustainable, or that the company is experiencing financial trouble to maintain the dividend. In some cases dividend payout ratios can top 100%, meaning the company may be going into debt to pay out dividends.

» Learn more: How to buy stocks

An alternative: dividend ETFs

Rather than pick individual high-dividend stocks through research or a list like the one above, many investors choose to invest in dividend exchange-traded funds.

An ETF is a bundle of securities packaged together into one investment. In the case of a dividend ETF, that bundle is made up of dividend stocks. With a dividend ETF, you can buy a large selection of individual dividend stocks in one transaction.

Generally speaking, investors benefit from investing in ETFs or other funds rather than individual stocks — funds offer easy diversification and a more reliable stream of income. In the case of a dividend ETF, that means if one stock cuts its dividend, that loss of income will be smoothed out by the other dividend stocks in the ETF.

You can buy dividend ETFs and dividend stocks through an online broker. Here are some top-rated brokers:

Trade Fee

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Account Minimum

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in cash bonus with a qualifying deposit

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60

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days of commission-free trades with qualifying deposit

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Account Minimum

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cash credit with a qualifying deposit

Want to see more? View the full list of the best brokers.

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