Which States Tax Social Security Benefits?

Here's what you need to know if you live in one of the nine states tax Social Security income in 2024.
Cheryl Lock
By Cheryl Lock 
Updated
Edited by Tina Orem

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In 2024, nine states tax Social Security income, down from 11 in 2023. Here’s how that can affect your retirement if you live in one of the nine states.

States that tax Social Security benefits

The following nine states tax Social Security benefits in 2024. The amount of state tax you’ll pay depends on factors such as your adjusted gross income (AGI), tax-filing status and, in some cases, your age. Keep in mind that tax laws can (and often do) change. Consult your state tax authority for the most up-to-date information.

🤓Nerdy Tip

Live in Missouri or Nebraska? Good news — they no longer tax Social Security income as of 2024.

Colorado

Colorado taxes Social Security benefits for taxpayers who receive over a certain amount in benefits. For taxpayers between age 55 and 54, the first $20,000 of retirement benefits are not taxable; taxpayers age 65 and older are not taxed on any of their Social Security benefits

Colorado Department of Revenue. Income Tax Topics: Social Security, Pensions, and Annuities. Accessed Jan 3, 2024.
.

Connecticut

Connecticut taxes Social Security benefits if your AGI is over $75,000 ($100,000 if married filing jointly). People with AGIs above those thresholds may get an exemption of up to 25% of their total benefits.

Connecticut Office of Legislative Research. Income Tax Exemptions for Retirement Income. Accessed Jan 3, 2024.
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Kansas

Kansas taxes Social Security for taxpayers with AGIs over $75,000

Kansas Department of Revenue. Frequently Asked Questions About Individual Income. Accessed Jan 3, 2024.
.

Minnesota

Minnesota taxes Social Security benefits for people with AGIs over $82,190 ($105,380 if married filing jointly or $52,690 if married filing separately)

Minnesota Department of Revenue. Tax Year 2024 Inflation-Adjusted Amounts In Minnesota Statutes. Accessed Jan 3, 2024.
.

Montana

Montana taxes Social Security benefits for adjusted gross incomes above $25,000. The threshold is $32,000 if married filing jointly; $25,000 if married filing separately while living apart for the full tax year. For married filing separately while living together at any time during the tax year, the threshold is $0

Montana Department of Revenue. Montana Income Tax Simplification Effective Tax Year 2024. Accessed Jan 8, 2024.
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New Mexico

New Mexico taxes Social Security benefits for taxpayers with more than $100,000 in income ($75,000 if married filing separately or $150,000 if a surviving spouse, head of household or married filing jointly)

New Mexico Taxation & Revenue. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham eliminates tax on Social Security. Accessed Jan 4, 2024.
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Rhode Island

Rhode Island taxes Social Security benefits if you begin receiving retirement benefits before you reach Social Security’s full retirement age (usually 67) or if your AGI is over $101,000 if you file as single, head of household, $126,250 for married filing jointly or $101,025 for married filing separately

. People under those thresholds can exempt up to $20,000 of their retirement income.

Utah

Utah taxes Social Security benefits for taxpayers who make over $45,000 ($75,000 if head of household or married filing jointly; $37,500 if married filing separately). People under those thresholds may qualify for a nonrefundable tax credit

Utah State Legislature. Title 59, Chapter 10, Part 10, Section 1042. Accessed Jan 4, 2024.
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Vermont

Vermont taxes Social Security for taxpayers with AGIs above $60,000 ($75,000 if married filing jointly). People with AGIs between $50,000 and $59,999 ($65,001 and $74,999 if married filing jointly) get a partial exemption

Vermont Department of Taxes. Seniors and Retirees. Accessed Jan 5, 2024.
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States that do not tax Social Security benefits

Most states do not tax Social Security benefits. They include:

  • Alabama. 

  • Alaska. 

  • Arizona.

  • Arkansas. 

  • California. 

  • Delaware. 

  • Florida.

  • Georgia.

  • Hawaii.

  • Idaho.

  • Illinois.

  • Indiana.

  • Iowa.

  • Kentucky.

  • Louisiana.

  • Maine.

  • Maryland.

  • Massachusetts.

  • Michigan.

  • Mississippi.

  • Missouri.

  • Nebraska.

  • Nevada.

  • New Hampshire. 

  • New Jersey.

  • New York.

  • North Carolina.

  • North Dakota.

  • Ohio.

  • Oklahoma.

  • Oregon.

  • Pennsylvania.

  • South Carolina.

  • South Dakota.

  • Tennessee.

  • Texas.

  • Virginia.

  • Washington.

  • Washington, D.C.

  • West Virginia.

  • Wisconsin.

  • Wyoming.

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How to reduce the tax burden on Social Security benefits

Paying any amount of tax on your Social Security benefits can feel like a big hit, but there are a few ways you might be able to lessen the taxable load.

  1. Lower your income. Because states that tax Social Security benefits usually do so based on your AGI, adjusting the total amount of money that you bring in each year to stay below the thresholds, where possible, could mean paying less in Social Security tax, or even avoiding it altogether.

  2. Delay taking Social Security payments. If you have access to other income in retirement from accounts that aren’t subject to taxation at withdrawal — such as a Roth IRA — consider taking money from those first to delay claiming your Social Security.

  3. Pay taxes over time. Paying throughout the year — rather than in one large lump sum once a year — can help lessen the blow. You can ask the Social Security Administration to withhold estimated federal income taxes from your Social Security check; consult with your state’s department of revenue to see if this is also an option for your state Social Security tax. 

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