Roth IRA Calculator

A Roth IRA is powerful tax-advantaged way to save for retirement. Use this calculator to find out how much your Roth IRA contributions could be worth at retirement, and what you would save in taxes. If you want to learn more about Roths and see if they're right for you, see our complete Roth IRA guide.

Roth IRA Balance at Retirement

$1.16M
Standard Taxable Account
Roth IRA
Based on age

,
an income of

and current savings of

You will need about
$6,208/month
in retirement
Your IRA will contribute
$2,637/month
in retirement at your current savings rate
Your tax savings will be
$399,878
when you retire
Tweak your numbers below

Annual Contribution: $5500 max

Retirement age

Rate of return

Marital Status

What's next?

See our Roth IRA guide to learn more about rules and eligibility, whether a Roth is right for you, and how to open an account with the best providers.

Ready to open an account?

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Combines high-quality customer service with low commissions and fees
$6.95 per trade
$100 - $600 bonus (based on account size)
$0
E-Trade4.5-stars
Waives $500 account minimum for IRAs
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60 days commission-free trades with deposit of $10,000 or more
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How we got here: Calculator methodology

How to use this Roth IRA calculator

  • You can calculate how much the money you plan to invest in your Roth IRA each year could be worth in retirement

  • The calculator automatically populates with your estimated maximum annual contribution based on your age, income and tax filing status. You can adjust that contribution down if you plan to contribute less.

  • The Roth IRA calculator defaults to a 6% rate of return, which should be adjusted to reflect the expected annual return of your investments. While returns are important, making regular contributions will boost your future balance considerably.

  • The calculator will show you the value of the Roth IRA’s tax-free investment growth by comparing your projected Roth IRA account balance at retirement to the balance you would have if you used a taxable account. We use your income and tax filing status to calculate your marginal tax rate.

What is a Roth IRA?

A Roth IRA is an tax-advantaged individual retirement account. Contributions to a Roth IRA are made after tax, and money grows tax-free. As long as you follow the rules for Roth IRA distributions, you’ll pay no income tax when you take this money out in retirement.

This is in stark contrast to the tax treatment of a traditional IRA and a 401(k); both of those accounts earn you a tax deduction on contributions, but distributions in retirement are taxed as income.

» MORE: IRA vs. 401(k): Which retirement account is best for you?

A Roth IRA isn’t itself an investment, but an account through which you can buy investments. Most Roth IRAs will give you access to a large investment selection, including individual stocks, bonds and mutual funds. The investments you select should be based on your risk tolerance and time horizon. For more, see how to invest your IRA.

Roth IRA eligibility and contribution limits

The total annual contribution limit for the Roth IRA is currently $5,500, with up to an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution allowed for those age 50 or older. That limit applies to both Roth and traditional IRA accounts; if you have both, you can contribute a total of up to $5,500.

At certain income levels, the Roth IRA’s maximum annual contribution begins to phase down, and the ability to contribute to a Roth IRA is eliminated completely in 2017 at a modified adjusted gross income of $196,000 for investors who are married filing jointly and $133,000 for single filers. This tool automatically calculates your maximum contribution for the year based on the age, income and the filing status you provide.

Filing statusModified AGIMaximum contribution
Married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)Less than $186,000$5,500 ($6,500 if 50 or older)
$186,000 to $195,999Contribution is reduced
$196,000 or moreNot eligible
Single, head of household or married filling separately (if you did NOT live with spouse during year)Less than $118,000$5,500 ($6,500 if 50 or older)
$118,000 to $132,999Contribution is reduced
$133,000 or moreNot eligible
Married filing separately (if you lived with spouse at any time during year)Less than $10,000Contribution is reduced
$10,000 or moreNot eligible

Roth IRA distributions

Because they’re made with after-tax dollars, you can pull contributions out of a Roth IRA at any time. But investment earnings are a different story — in general, in order to withdrawal investment earnings from your Roth IRA, the account must be at least five years old and you must be 59 ½ or older. The five-year clock starts Jan. 1 of the year you made your first contribution.

With a few exceptions, all other withdrawals of earnings may be taxed as income and, in some cases, penalized with an additional 10% tax. Here’s a full rundown of the rules for Roth IRA distributions.

What if I’m not eligible or my contribution limit is reduced?

First, if you are eligible to contribute a reduced amount, we’d recommend taking advantage of that, as even a reduced contribution is valuable. If you’ve done that or you’re not eligible to contribute at all, there are several other tax-advantaged ways to save for retirement.

  • If you have a 401(k) at work:

    We'd suggest using that as your primary retirement account. You can contribute up to $18,000 per year (with another $6,000 as a catch-up contribution for those 50 or older). Some employers even offer a Roth version of the 401(k) with no income limits.

    You can also contribute up to $5,500 ($6,500 if you're 50 or older) to a nondeductible traditional IRA. Why nondeductible? Because the IRS limits the ability to deduct traditional IRA contributions at certain income levels for investors who also have access to a 401(k). But your contributions to a nondeductible traditional IRA will still grow tax-deferred, and if you'd like, you can take advantage of a backdoor Roth IRA: The IRS allows you to convert after-tax money in a traditional IRA into a Roth IRA. These conversions are not subject to income limitations. Learn more about how to open a backdoor Roth IRA.

  • If you don't have a 401(k):

    If you're single or your spouse also doesn't have a 401(k), you can make deductible contributions to a traditional IRA. You'll get a tax deduction for your contributions, and your money will grow tax-deferred. Distributions will be taxed in retirement.

    If you’re above the IRS income limit for a Roth IRA and your spouse has a 401(k), you also can’t deduct contributions to a traditional IRA. You can contribute after-tax money to the traditional IRA instead, then utilize the backdoor Roth IRA mentioned above by converting the traditional IRA into a Roth IRA.