Titan Review 2021: Pros, Cons and How It Compares

Titan offers a distinctive strategy for investment management, but doesn't have some of the perks offered by other firms.

Alana BensonMar 3, 2021
Many or all of the products featured here are from our partners who compensate us. This may influence which products we write about and where and how the product appears on a page. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own. Here is a list of our partners and here's how we make money.

Our Take

The bottom line: Titan offers no-frill investing in stock-heavy portfolios. Titan aims to bring all investors the kind of investment management that's typically offered only to the wealthy, with actively managed stock portfolios. Compared with hedge funds and similar offerings, the 1% fee is low. But investors who want tax strategy, access to financial advisors or other features may want to look elsewhere.

Titan

on Titan's website

on Titan's website

Fees

1%

for balances of $10,000 or more ($5/month for lower balances)

Account Minimum

$100

Promotion

None

no promotion available at this time

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Low account minimum.

  • Low fees.

  • Offers personal portfolios with a hedge-fund-like strategy.

Cons

  • Customer service not available by phone.

  • No access to financial advisors.

  • No tax strategy.

Compare to Other Advisors

Titan
Betterment
SoFi Automated Investing
NerdWallet rating 
NerdWallet rating 
Fees

1%

for balances of $10,000 or more ($5/month for lower balances)

Fees

0.25%

management fee

Fees

0%

management fee

Account Minimum

$100

Account Minimum

$0

Account Minimum

$0

Promotion

None

no promotion available at this time

Promotion

Up to 1 year

of free management with a qualifying deposit

Promotion

Free

career counseling plus loan discounts with qualifying deposit

Get more smart money moves — straight to your inbox

Become a NerdWallet member, and we’ll send you tailored articles we think you’ll love.

Full Review

Titan was founded in 2017 by former hedge fund managers who were frustrated by the divide between the investment advice and access their wealthy clients received, and the advice that was given to friends and family. They wanted to create world-class investment management for everyone. To do this, Titan uses two investment strategies with minimums starting at just $100.

Titan is best for:

  • Investors who want an actively managed stock portfolio.

  • Investors who want Wall Street-level intel.

  • Investors who want access to hedge-fund-like strategies at a low minimum.

Titan at a glance

Account minimum

Titan Flagship: $100 ($500 for IRAs).

Titan Opportunities: $10,000.

Account fees

Account balance of $10,000 or more: Annual fee of 1% charged monthly.

Account balance of less than $10,000: $5 per month.

Portfolio composition

15 to 20 stocks. Inverse ETFs are occasionally used as part of Titan's hedging strategy.

Access to advisors

None, though investors can contact the investor relations team through the app for questions about the investment strategies.

Supported accounts

  • Taxable accounts.

  • Traditional, Roth and inherited/beneficiary IRAs.

Titan features you should know

Stock-only investments: Unlike a typical robo-advisor, Titan does not offer fund-focused portfolios. Instead, Titan features two different investment strategies: Titan Flagship and Titan Opportunities. Both strategies typically hold 20 stocks, but can fluctuate between 15 and 25. Occasionally, inverse exchange-traded funds are included for Titan’s hedging strategy to serve as possible protection from an extended market downturn. (Inverse ETFs attempt to “short” the market by betting against an index. They can also be used to hedge against risk in similar investments in your portfolio.) For example, in March 2020, the firm shorted the market with a small portion of clients’ capital ahead of the COVID-related crash.

Here are some of the differences between the two strategies:

Titan Flagship

Titan Opportunities

Account minimums

$100 for individual accounts and $500 for IRAs

$10,000

Portfolio focus

Large cap, U.S.-focused

Small and mid cap, U.S.-focused

If you qualify for Titan Opportunities, you can be invested in both strategies, depending on your personal factors, such as risk tolerance.

Investing in a smaller number of stocks, as is the case with Titan's portfolios, can be riskier than investing in a handful of broad-market index funds or ETFs, which can hold hundreds of different stocks within a single investment.

Fees: Clients with $10,000 invested or more are charged an annual fee of 1%. Clients with less than $10,000 invested pay $5 a month. As with most varied fee structures, there is a point at which you would be paying more, as a percentage of your assets, at a lower balance.

The $5 monthly fee may sound low, but with lower account balances, the amount you’re paying may actually be a much higher percentage of your assets. For example, if you’re paying $5 a month (or $60 a year) for asset management on a $500 balance, you’re paying 12%. If you have $6,000 managed, you’ll pay 1%. Anything between $6,000 and $10,000 will be less than the 1% fee Titan charges on balances of $10,000 or more.

To compare, many robo-advisors charge 0.25% per year regardless of account balance, though the investment strategies of those advisors are typically passive rather than Titan's active approach.

Low investment minimum: All accounts held with Titan must maintain a minimum balance to remain open. For the Titan Flagship strategy, that balance is $100 for taxable accounts and $500 for individual retirement accounts. The Titan Opportunities strategy has a significantly higher minimum of $10,000.

High-level intel: Titan gives investors a window into the decision-making process behind its portfolios with videos and live updates — or, as it calls them, “courtside seats.” These help investors understand how global events affect stocks in your portfolio and why Titan may or may not jump on board with new IPOs. You can also message the investor relations team through the app with any questions you may have about the investment decisions the team has made, but the team cannot give you personalized financial advice.

Account types: Titan offers taxable accounts, as well as traditional, Roth and inherited/beneficiary IRAs. You can roll over an existing IRA, 401(k) or 403(b) account into an IRA with Titan.

No extra features: Titan offers stock-focused investment management, but that’s about it. Other investment management firms include features such as access to certified financial planners, banking, goal setting, socially responsible investment portfolios and tax strategies. And many of them charge less than the 1% Titan charges.

» Want more options? Check out the best robo-advisors

High target returns: While past performance is no indicator of future performance, Titan’s stock-picking strategy has performed well so far. According to The Fourth Quarter 2020 Robo Report, Titan delivered a total return of 44.42% in 2020. In comparison, the S&P 500 index returned 18.39% and the average robo-advisor returned 14.90%.

Say you had $10,000 managed by Titan during 2020. Sure, you would have paid $100 in fees, but you also would have made a $4,442 return, netting you a total of $4,342. Had you worked with the average robo-advisor, you would have made only $1,490 before paying advisor fees.

Customer service: Titan’s customer service is limited, offering only chat and email during weekday business hours.

Is Titan right for you?

If you're interested in access to a hedge-fund-like strategy, Titan’s approach may work well for you. If you think you may need financial planning help or tax assistance in the near future, you may want to think about working with a financial advisor (though Titan is planning to launch a tax strategy at some point in 2021).

» Curious about other options? Explore the best financial advisors

on Titan's website