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Visa Infinite: What Is It, and What Are the Benefits?

Visa's top-tier benefits package includes purchase protection, return protection and travel assistance, as well as all the perks of the Signature and Traditional levels.
Aug. 28, 2019
Credit Cards, Rewards Credit Cards
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“Visa Infinite” is a package of superpremium benefits available on certain cards that carry the Visa label. It’s the top tier within Visa’s three levels of benefits, tailored to high-net-worth cardholders.

First introduced overseas, Visa Infinite came to the U.S. around 2016 and remains relatively uncommon. Cards on the Visa Infinite platform include the Chase Sapphire Reserve® and the City National Rewards Crystal Visa Infinite® Credit Card .

Here’s a quick summary of Visa Infinite benefits and a guide to using them.

Summary of Visa Infinite benefits

Visa offers three levels of benefits: Traditional, Signature and Infinite. Each level includes all the benefits from the levels below it.

Benefits offered at the Infinite level

  • Purchase protection (coverage for theft or damage).
  • Return protection.
  • Trip cancellation and interruption coverage.
  • Trip delay reimbursement.
  • Travel accident insurance.
  • Lost luggage reimbursement.

Lower-tier benefits included in infinite

For details about using benefits from the Signature (S) and Traditional (T) tiers, see our article on Visa Signature.

  • Extended warranty protection (S).
  • Travel and emergency assistance (S).
  • Year-end spending summary (S).
  • Visa Signature concierge (S).
  • Roadside assistance (T).
  • Auto rental collision damage waiver (T).
  • Zero fraud liability (T).
  • Lost/stolen card reporting, emergency replacement and emergency cash (T).
  • Cardholder inquiry service (T).

VISA BENEFITS VS. ISSUER BENEFITS

Before we go into detail on these benefits, it’s important to understand a few basic points:

  • Most of the features on a typical Visa credit card aren’t dictated by Visa at all, but rather by the bank that issued the card (such as Chase, City National or your local bank). Rewards rates, bonuses, interest rates and fees are all determined by the issuer.
  • Visa makes Infinite benefits available on cards that carry the Visa Infinite label, but it is up to the issuing bank to decide whether a particular card actually includes a particular benefit.
  • Many issuers offer their own benefits on top of (or in place of) those offered by Visa. These may be even more generous than Visa Infinite benefits.

Purchase protection

How it works

Also called “purchase security,” this benefit reimburses you when something you buy with your Visa Infinite card is stolen or damaged within 90 days of the purchase. You can be reimbursed for up to $10,000 per occurrence (see below) and $50,000 per year.

  • If the item is stolen, you must file a police report within 48 hours. Items that are simply lost are not eligible for reimbursement.
  • You have 60 days from the date of the theft or damage to report it to Visa. Call the benefits administrator at 888-221-3289.
  • You have 90 days from the date of the theft or damage to file a claim for reimbursement. You can do it all online, including uploading your supporting documents. Go to cardbenefitservices.com.

Things to consider

Many items are excluded. This includes (among other things) preowned or used items; plants and animals; motor vehicles; antiques and collectibles; items damaged by a delivery service; traveler’s checks, tickets and other negotiable items; and real estate or items installed in real estate, like hardwired appliances. See the full list of exclusions here.

Gifts you buy for others are covered. Also, purchases outside the U.S. are eligible for reimbursement.

Coverage is per “occurrence,” not per item. Say your house is broken into (or hit by a tornado) and you lose a bunch of stuff you bought with your card. The $10,000 limit applies to all losses caused by the break-in or the tornado. So if you had three items worth $4,000 apiece and all were destroyed, your coverage would max out at $10,000.

Return protection

HOW IT WORKS

When you buy something with your Visa Infinite card and want to return it within 90 days, Visa will take it even if the store refuses to. You can be reimbursed for up to $300 per item and up to $1,000 per year.

  • You have to try to return it to the merchant first. If you get a full refund, then you don’t need the benefit. If the merchant won’t take it back, then file claim with Visa. If you get only a partial refund from the merchant, Visa may cover the difference.
  • You have 90 days from the date of purchase to notify Visa. Call 888-221-3289 to say you want to return something.
  • You have 30 days to file a claim. This clock starts ticking once you notify Visa that you want to use the return protection benefit. Go to cardbenefitservices.com to start a claim and upload supporting documents (including the receipt and your credit card statement showing the purchase; you may be asked to provide more information, such as a copy of the store’s return policy).

Things to consider

The store won’t take the item back — but you don’t get to keep it. You’ll have to ship the item to Visa. For your claim to be approved, the item must be in like-new condition and in working order.

There are a lot of exclusions. A lot of the same items excluded from purchase protection are also ineligible for return protection. In addition, return protection excludes a few things that people are tempted to buy, use once and take back. So forget about, say, buying a tuxedo or formal gown for one big night out and then getting Visa to eat the cost. See the full list of exclusions here

Trip cancellation and interruption coverage

HOW IT WORKS

If you’re forced to cancel or cut short a trip because of illness, injury or other covered reason, you can get reimbursed for up to $2,000 in nonrefundable transportation costs — not just airfare, but also train, bus or cruise tickets. You must have bought your tickets with your Visa Infinite card.

Things to consider

Only transportation costs will be reimbursed. Prepaid hotel stays, event tickets, reservation fees and other costs aren’t covered.

Coverage depends on why your trip was canceled or interrupted. If you’re injured in a car accident the day before your trip, or if you suffer food poisoning on your vacation, or if a hurricane makes it impossible to reach your destination, you’re likely to be covered. But many things are excluded. These include acute illness triggered by pre-existing conditions; injuries suffered in certain activities (including sports); the effects of cosmetic surgery; and illness or injury resulting from intoxication.

Trip delay reimbursement

HOW IT WORKS

This benefit provides up to $500 in coverage for expenses you incur when your flight is delayed at least six hours or requires an overnight stay, regardless of the reason — weather, air traffic congestion, mechanical and so on. It’s much more flexible than airline policies, which often give you nothing for weather delays and very little for everything else.

What’s covered: “Reasonable additional expenses” that you wouldn’t have had to pay if not for the delay. That includes things like:

  • Lodging for an overnight delay.
  • Meals while you wait.
  • Transportation/parking costs to leave the airport and come back.

Filing a claim: Save all your receipts and make note of all your flight information — airline, flight number, scheduled and actual departure times. Start a claim at eclaimsline.com or call 800-546-9806

Things to consider

Additional expenses are covered, but losses are not. Say you were traveling to see a Broadway show, and you’d paid $300 for those theater tickets. Your flight is delayed, and you miss the show. That cost is not covered by the trip-delay benefit.

The delay must be unforeseeable. If your trip is delayed because of something you knew (or could have known) beforehand, you might not be covered. For example, if an airline’s mechanics have been on strike, and the strike has been resulting in delays day after day, then a delay in your flight would have been foreseeable and may not be covered.

Travel accident insurance

HOW IT WORKS

When you buy airline, train, bus, ferry or other transportation tickets with your Visa Infinite card, you get $500,000 of accidental death and dismemberment insurance. You’re covered while traveling, as well as while you’re getting on or off the plane (or train, bus, etc.) and when you’re waiting to board. This coverage comes on top of any other insurance you have.

Lost luggage reimbursement

HOW IT WORKS

If an airline (or other carrier) loses your luggage, you can be reimbursed up to $3,000 per trip. (For New York residents, the limit is $2,000 per bag). However, this coverage comes into play only after you get reimbursed by the airline and your homeowners or renters insurance policy.

The coverage applies to things like clothing but excludes many valuable items. Keep items like these with you rather than in your bags, as they are not covered:

  • Eyeglasses, contact lenses, hearing aids, dentures and prosthetics.
  • Cash, coins, traveler’s checks, securities, tickets and valuable documents.
  • Cameras, sporting equipment and furniture.
  • See the full list of exclusions here.

Guidance for filing a claim:

  1. Report missing luggage to the carrier immediately. If your luggage is missing, you must file a report with the airline before you leave the airport; get a copy of the report.
  2. Ensure your luggage is truly “lost.” In most cases, lost luggage isn’t really lost at all — just delayed or misdirected — and arrives at its intended destination on another flight within a day or so. Airlines typically consider a bag lost when it doesn’t turn up within five to 14 days, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.
  3. Notify Visa within 20 days of the loss. Start the process at eclaimsline.com or call 800-546-9806. Although Visa will not be the first place you go for reimbursement, you still have to put in this notification to be eligible to file a claim with Visa later on.
  4. File a claim with the airline. Under federal law, airlines are liable for up to $3,500 per passenger for lost baggage, although individual airlines can offer more coverage if they want.
  5. File a claim through your personal insurance. Assuming that the money you get from the airline isn’t enough to cover your loss, your next step is any insurance policy you have — such as homeowners insurance or renters insurance — that covers lost possessions. Visa’s coverage kicks in only after your other insurance does.
  6. File a claim with Visa within 90 days of the loss. This benefit covers anything left over after the airline and your personal insurance (if you have it) pay.

Things to consider

Filing a claim can be costly. The requirement that you start with your own insurance sharply limits the value of this benefit. Making insurance claims, especially small ones, can cost you thousands more in the long run because of higher premiums. In some cases, cutting your losses may be the least expensive alternative.

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