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Average Car Insurance Costs in 2019

April 18, 2019
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The national average cost of car insurance is $1,621 per year, according to NerdWallet’s 2019 rate analysis. That works out to about $135-per-month policies for 40-year-old drivers with good credit and no at-fault accidents on their records before any discounts are applied. This cost includes liability, comprehensive, collision and any additional state-mandated coverage types.

For minimum required coverage, the average cost is $676 per year, on average across states, or about $56 per month for drivers with good credit and clean driving records.

But averages don’t say much about your own car insurance rates. A number of personal factors, both within and outside of your control, inch rates up or down until your price is totally personalized.


How much does car insurance cost in my state?

Whether you’re relocating to a new state soon or you just want a local benchmark, it can help to look at the average cost of car insurance by state. According to our 2019 car insurance rate analysis, for drivers with good credit and no recent accidents:

  • Maine is the cheapest state for full coverage car insurance with an annual average rate of $897, followed by North Carolina and Idaho.
  • Michigan is the most expensive state for full coverage auto insurance at $4,079 per year on average, followed by Louisiana and New York.
  • Wyoming is the cheapest state for minimum-required coverage, at an annual average car insurance rate of $315, followed by Iowa and South Dakota.
  • For minimum required coverage, Michigan is the most expensive state at $2,508 per year, on average, followed by New York and New Jersey.

To see the average full coverage car insurance rate in your state, hover over it in the map below on a computer, or tap if you’re using a mobile device.

Full coverage car insurance costs two to three times as much as minimum coverage, on average, according to our 2019 price analysis.

“Full coverage” isn’t a type of policy you can select from a list, but generally includes comprehensive and collision insurance on top of any additional state-mandated coverage types, such as liability. The policies we analyze also include uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.

»MORE: Minimum required car insurance in every state

Average car insurance costs for full and minimum coverage by state

StateFull coverageMinimum coverageAnnual difference
Average$1,621$676$946
Alabama$1,468$522$946
Alaska$1,282$446$835
Arizona$1,549$655$893
Arkansas$1,386$498$888
California$1,817$631$1,186
Colorado$2,065$681$1,384
Connecticut$2,039$947$1,092
Delaware$2,444$1,208$1,237
District of Columbia$1,698$795$903
Florida$2,411$1,140$1,271
Georgia$1,921$794$1,127
Hawaii$1,312$502$810
Idaho$990$398$592
Illinois$1,439$648$792
Indiana$1,142$464$677
Iowa$1,013$325$688
Kansas$1,538$575$963
Kentucky$2,007$869$1,138
Louisiana$3,678$1,167$2,511
Maine$897$378$519
Maryland$1,971$1,077$893
Massachusetts$1,270$547$723
Michigan$4,079$2,508$1,571
Minnesota$1,673$832$841
Mississippi$1,478$523$954
Missouri$1,521$624$897
Montana$1,277$411$866
Nebraska$1,127$423$704
Nevada$2,414$976$1,437
New Hampshire$1,125$474$650
New Jersey$2,173$1,279$894
New Mexico$1,570$554$1,016
New York$2,647$1,448$1,199
North Carolina$978$398$580
North Dakota$1,241$405$836
Ohio$1,123$520$603
Oklahoma$1,596$522$1,074
Oregon$1,758$1,062$696
Pennsylvania$1,298$477$822
Rhode Island$2,159$925$1,234
South Carolina$1,322$572$750
South Dakota$1,155$326$829
Tennessee$1,445$474$971
Texas$1,934$726$1,208
Utah$1,400$702$698
Vermont$1,082$386$696
Virginia$1,139$480$660
Washington$1,029$508$521
West Virginia$1,490$603$887
Wisconsin$1,044$466$578
Wyoming$1,128$315$813

Average car insurance costs by company

Every car insurance company sets rates based on dozens of factors including your driving history, location, vehicle and demographics. They’re making an educated guess about how likely you are to file a claim in the future and setting your price accordingly.

Each insurer treats each factor differently. If you have poor credit, one insurer might charge you 10% more for the policy, while another would charge 40% more. A discount for being claim-free in recent years might earn you a 20% discount with one company and 5% at another.

All this results in very different rates from one person to the next. This is why the company that gives your friend super-low rates might not be the cheapest for you. Here are annual rates for 25 large insurers, for full and minimum coverage.

Average car insurance costs from large companies

StateFull coverageMinimum required coverage
*USAA is only available to active military, veterans and their families.
21st Century$1,510$638
Allstate$1,964$872
American Family$1,214$552
Amica$1,360$540
Auto Club$2,793$664
CSAA$1,809$558
Auto-Owners$1,545$570
Country Financial$1,248$684
Erie$771$295
Esurance$2,088$1,197
Farmers$1,855$850
Geico$1,627$614
Hanover$3,057$1,434
Liberty Mutual$2,752$1,146
Mapfre$949$471
Mercury$1,895$724
MetLife$1,293$470
Nationwide$1,509$771
NJM$1,418$645
Progressive$1,828$773
Safeco$2,045$788
Shelter$1,653$668
State Farm$1,337$594
Travelers$1,279$637
USAA*$896$319

Bear in mind that state regulations heavily affect prices, and some of these companies are primarily available in “cheap” or “expensive” states for auto insurance. We can only get rates from up to 12 of the largest carriers in a state, so many smaller insurers aren’t included due to a lack of pricing data.

Average car insurance costs for good and bad credit

Insurers use a “credit-based insurance score,” similar to a credit score, to help set rates in most states. This score is a big factor in your car insurance cost, and it can feel like a double whammy paying high premiums while trying to build your credit. In most states, insurers point to data linking poor credit to more frequent insurance claims to justify the higher prices to state regulators.

The score’s impact on your premium depends on where you live and which car insurance company you choose. In three states — California, Hawaii and Massachusetts — car insurance pricing based on credit history is banned by law.

The average car insurance costs below for good and bad credit in each state are for drivers with no recent tickets or accidents and full coverage insurance.

Average car insurance costs for good and bad credit by state

StateGood creditPoor creditAnnual difference
Alabama$1,468$2,673$1,205
Alaska$1,282$2,054
$772
Arizona$1,549$2,888$1,339
Arkansas$1,386$2,361$974
California$1,817$1,817$0
Colorado$2,065$3,705$1,640
Connecticut$2,039$3,482$1,443
Delaware$2,444$4,706$2,261
District of Columbia$1,698$3,117$1,419
Florida$2,411$4,403$1,991
Georgia$1,921$3,132$1,211
Hawaii$1,312$1,312$0
Idaho$990$1,770$779
Illinois$1,439$2,548$1,108
Indiana$1,142$2,012$871
Iowa$1,013$1,544$531
Kansas$1,538$2,415$877
Kentucky$2,007$4,052$2,045
Louisiana$3,678$6,308$2,630
Maine$897$1,483$586
Maryland$1,971$3,191$1,220
Massachusetts$1,270$1,270$0
Michigan$4,079$10,437$6,358
Minnesota$1,673$3,484$1,811
Mississippi$1,478$2,461$984
Missouri$1,521$3,225$1,703
Montana$1,277$2,149$872
Nebraska$1,127$1,908$782
Nevada$2,414$4,687$2,274
New Hampshire$1,125$1,937$812
New Jersey$2,173$4,159$1,986
New Mexico$1,570$2,562$992
New York$2,647$5,509$2,862
North Carolina$978$1,652$674
North Dakota$1,241$2,240$999
Ohio$1,123$1,945$821
Oklahoma$1,596$2,655$1,059
Oregon$1,758$3,300$1,542
Pennsylvania$1,298$2,345$1,047
Rhode Island$2,159$3,475$1,317
South Carolina$1,322$2,359$1,037
South Dakota$1,155$1,913$758
Tennessee$1,445$2,582$1,137
Texas$1,934$3,110$1,175
Utah$1,400$2,706$1,305
Vermont$1,082$2,104$1,022
Virginia$1,139$1,774$635
Washington$1,029$1,800$770
West Virginia$1,490$2,721$1,231
Wisconsin$1,044$1,766$721
Wyoming$1,128$1,608$480

You can only do so much about where you live, so it’s important to compare car insurance rates from companies in your area — especially if you have poor credit. Some of the average annual rate differences by company are just as eye-popping as the differences by state.

Average cost of car insurance for good and bad credit by company

CompanyGood creditPoor creditAnnual difference
*USAA is only available to active military, veterans and their families.
Allstate$1,964$3,368$1,404
American Family$1,214$2,018$804
Amica$1,360$2,531$1,171
Country Financial$1,248$1,989$741
Erie$771$2,021$1,250
Esurance$2,088$3,937$1,849
Farmers$1,855$3,378$1,523
Frankenmuth$2,576$5,577$3,001
Geico$1,627$2,635$1,008
Liberty Mutual$2,752$5,411$2,659
Mercury$1,895$3,149$1,254
Nationwide$1,509$2,059$550
NJM$1,418$2,136$718
Progressive$1,828$3,355$1,527
Safeco$2,045$3,980$1,935
Shelter$1,653$2,616$963
State Farm$1,337$2,978$1,641
Travelers$1,279$2,445$1,166
USAA$896$1,741$845

This list includes the largest companies in the U.S. that we can get average annual car insurance rates for in states that allow credit-based pricing.

Average car insurance rates after an at-fault accident

Causing an accident can raise your auto insurance costs for three to five years afterward, depending on your company. How much your rates will rise also depends on the insurer, the severity of damage and whether you have accident forgiveness on your policy or any “good driver” discounts you stand to lose. This is why it’s wise to shop for car insurance quotes just after the third and fifth anniversary of your wreck to see if you can get a better deal.

We looked at average car insurance prices for drivers with no accidents and drivers with recent at-fault accidents, with all other factors the same. The hypothetical accident was relatively minor, resulting in $5,000 worth of property damage and no injuries.

Average car insurance costs by company and accident history

CompanyClean driving historyOne at-fault accidentDifference
*USAA is only available to active military, veterans and their families.
21st Century$1,510$2,633$1,123
Allstate$1,964$3,006$1,042
American Family$1,214$1,749$535
Amica$1,360$2,146$786
Auto Club$2,793$4,163$1,370
Auto-Owners$1,545$2,156$611
Country Financial$1,248$1,838$590
CSAA$1,809$2,279$470
Erie$771$1,003$232
Esurance$2,088$3,440$1,352
Farmers$1,855$2,668$813
Geico$1,627$2,834$1,207
Hanover$3,057$4,621$1,564
Liberty Mutual$2,752$3,592$840
Mapfre$949$1,447$498
Mercury$1,895$3,069$1,174
MetLife$1,293$2,480$1,187
Nationwide$1,509$2,334$825
NJM$1,418$1,418$0
Progressive$1,828$3,361$1,533
Safeco$2,045$2,952$907
Shelter$1,653$2,974$1,321
State Farm$1,337$1,637$300
Travelers$1,279$1,790$511
USAA$896$1,247$351

Rates listed only reflect prices in states where these companies have a large presence. They don’t represent your specific rates or every state in which the companies are available. Even so, you can see how varied rates are among them.

State to state, car insurance rates after an accident are a little more predictable. Increases tend to stay in the 40% – 60% range, with the average price increase at about 52% in the first year after an accident. Exceptions are notable in Kentucky, Maryland and North Carolina, where quotes increase after an accident by 80% to 90%, on average.

In Hawaii, New York and Michigan, price differences were lowest, although car insurance prices in Michigan and New York are high overall compared to other states.

Average car insurance cost by state and accident history

StateDrivers with clean accident historyDrivers with one at-fault accidentAnnual difference
Alabama$1,468$2,169$701
Alaska$1,282$1,981$699
Arizona$1,549$2,519$970
Arkansas$1,386$2,243$857
California$1,817$2,945$1,128
Colorado$2,065$2,889$824
Connecticut$2,039$2,969$930
Delaware$2,444$3,425$980
District of Columbia$1,698$2,636$938
Florida$2,411$3,597$1,186
Georgia$1,921$3,012$1,092
Hawaii$1,312$1,796$484
Idaho$990$1,387$397
Illinois$1,439$2,254$815
Indiana$1,142$1,661$519
Iowa$1,013$1,484$471
Kansas$1,538$2,336$798
Kentucky$2,007$3,627$1,620
Louisiana$3,678$5,158$1,481
Maine$897$1,315$418
Maryland$1,971$2,981$1,010
Massachusetts$1,270$2,322$1,052
Michigan$4,079$5,683$1,604
Minnesota$1,673$2,341$667
Mississippi$1,478$2,209$731
Missouri$1,521$2,183$662
Montana$1,277$1,954$677
Nebraska$1,127$1,630$504
Nevada$2,414$3,855$1,441
New Hampshire$1,125$1,782$657
New Jersey$2,173$3,533$1,360
New Mexico$1,570$2,487$917
New York$2,647$3,632$985
North Carolina$978$1,856$878
North Dakota$1,241$1,732$491
Ohio$1,123$1,678$555
Oklahoma$1,596$2,415$819
Oregon$1,758$2,580$822
Pennsylvania$1,298$2,093$795
Rhode Island$2,159$3,101$942
South Carolina$1,322$2,279$957
South Dakota$1,155$1,744$589
Tennessee$1,445$2,098$653
Texas$1,934$3,001$1,067
Utah$1,400$2,154$754
Vermont$1,082$1,707$625
Virginia$1,139$1,844$705
Washington$1,029$1,630$601
West Virginia$1,490$2,324$834
Wisconsin$1,044$1,544$499
Wyoming$1,128$1,645$517

Like our rates by company, these are annual averages representing an accident with no injuries and $5,000 in property damage. Accidents resulting in medical costs can be very expensive and result in even steeper rate increases. In addition, you’ll typically lose any claims-free or good driver discounts after causing an accident, so you could see much larger rate increases than these.

Average car insurance costs by gender

On average, car insurance costs differ little by gender compared to differences we see by company, state, credit score and accident history. Gender-based pricing is banned by law in seven states: Hawaii, Massachusetts, Montana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, parts of Michigan and, starting in 2019, California.

That doesn’t mean that a cost difference due to your gender would be insignificant, only that it’s not a pricing factor well-illustrated by national statistics. In states where the practice is allowed, we averaged rates for men and women separately and found that on average, women pay about $51 more than men per year.

Our sample drivers are all 40 years old, and among 20-somethings, men tend to pay more.

Average cost of car insurance by vehicle

In other analyses, we used a 3-year-old Toyota Camry (the most popular sedan in America by sales in recent years) to show how rates vary by personal history and demographics. But the make and model of your vehicle will certainly affect your rates.

Insurers charge more to cover certain cars, including:

  • Sports cars, which have higher top speeds. People tend to drive them faster, increasing the likelihood of a wreck or traffic violation. If you get a speeding ticket, insurers think you’ll be more likely to cause an accident, which increases rates further.
  • Luxury cars because they tend to have expensive parts and details that are more expensive to replace if damaged in a crash.
  • Electric vehicles, which have more expensive engine parts to replace, especially the batteries that can cost thousands each.
  • Cars stolen often, which tend to have higher rates for comprehensive insurance, which pays out when your car is stolen or damaged by something non-traffic-related, such as floods, fire and vandalism. Comprehensive insurance is typically optional unless you have a loan or lease.

To see how rates differ depending on your vehicle, we looked at average car insurance rates for the 25 most popular vehicles based on sales. As you can see below, the Camry is far from the cheapest model — that honor goes to the Subaru Outback for an average car insurance cost of $1,566 per year.

RankAverage annual insurance premium
1. Subaru Outback$1,566
2. Ford Escape$1,656
2. Chevrolet Equinox$1,710
4. Toyota RAV4$1,750
5. Honda CR-V$1,753
6. Nissan Rogue$1,762
7. Jeep Wrangler$1,764
8. Toyota Tacoma$1,769
9. Jeep Cherokee$1,775
10. Toyota Highlander$1,788
11. Ford Explorer$1,790
12. Ford F-Series trucks$1,805
13. Chevrolet Cruze$1,843
14. Ford Fusion$1,850
15. GMC Sierra$1,851
16. Honda Accord$1,852
17. Hyundai Elantra$1,865
18. Honda Civic$1,876
19. Chevrolet Silverado$1,885
20. Dodge Ram trucks$1,890
21. Chevrolet Malibu$1,912
22. Toyota Camry$1,937
23. Nissan Altima$1,962
24. Nissan Sentra$1,965
25. Toyota Corolla$1,980

You can see that as you go down the list, the average price changes by as little as $1 per row, but between the Outback and the Toyota Corolla, there’s an annual difference of $414, on average. That works out to about $35 per month — perhaps not enough to persuade someone with their heart set on a Corolla to buy an Outback instead.

What other factors affect my car insurance cost?

After all these rates and pricing factors, it could be hard to figure out what other factors could possibly affect your rates. Here’s a portion of them:

  • More specific location data such as your ZIP code or city.
  • Your occupation, in many states.
  • Moving violations such as speeding tickets and DUIs.
  • Your previous insurance company — if it was a nonstandard insurer specializing in high-risk drivers, you might see higher insurance rates with some companies.
  • Continuous insurance coverage. Companies charge more for drivers with lapses in coverage.
  • Annual mileage driven per car.
  • Your marital status. Single people, even widows, widowers and the divorced, tend to have higher insurance rates.
  • Whether you own your home (and whether you bundle home insurance with auto).
  • How much education you’ve completed.
  • Additional coverage options you choose, such as new-car replacement coverage and gap coverage.
  • Discounts you’re eligible for, which vary widely by company.
  • Whom you live with; some companies won’t allow you to exclude people such as roommates or non-driving adults from your policy.

How to get cheap car insurance

By now you may have concluded that average car insurance costs have little to do with your own — this is true. No matter how many averages you look at, the same disclaimer holds true: “Your own rates will be different.”

But you can still find the best cheap insurance for you by shopping around for rates every year and every time something major happens in your life, including marriage, a new job, moving or buying a new car. Additionally, if you’ve had a recent at-fault accident, DUI or other traffic violation, be sure to shop in the month after the third and fifth anniversaries of the incident.

If you’re ready to shop, you can check out the cheapest companies in your own state for several driver profiles.

To compare average car insurance prices:
NerdWallet averaged rates for 40-year-old men and women for 20 ZIP codes in each state and Washington, D.C., from the largest insurers, up to 12 in each state. “Good drivers” had no moving violations on record and credit in the “good” tier as reported to each insurer. For the other two driver profiles, we changed the credit tier to “poor” or added one at-fault accident, keeping everything else the same. Sample drivers with full coverage had the following coverage limits:

  • $100,000 bodily injury liability coverage per person.
  • $300,000 bodily injury liability coverage per crash.
  • $50,000 property damage liability coverage per crash.
  • $100,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person.
  • $300,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per crash.
  • Collision coverage with $1,000 deductible.
  • Comprehensive coverage with $1,000 deductible.

In states where required, minimum additional coverages were added. For minimum coverage category, we used the driver profile for good drivers with good credit and assigned minimum insurance coverage required by law in each state so averages by state reflect minimum requirements in each. Averages by company include rates in 20 zip codes of all states for which a company is a) available in and b) has a large enough market share to be one of the largest 12 companies.

We used a 2015 Toyota Camry in all cases except where models are otherwise listed. For average rates by vehicle, all models listed had 2018 manufacturer year. These are sample rates generated through Quadrant Information Services. Your own rates will be different.