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NerdWallet’s Best EMV ‘Chip With Signature’ Credit Cards

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Best EMV Chip Credit Cards

If you’ve gotten a new credit card recently, you may have noticed it has a tiny microchip embedded in it. This is an EMV chip, and you’ll likely see one in each of your cards soon. But don’t worry, this is a positive change: EMV chips make your point-of-sale transactions more secure and allow you to pay for goods and services at chip-only terminals.

Read on to learn all about EMV technology, as well as our favorite chipped cards and how to switch from swiping to dipping when you pay with plastic.

Table of Contents

What EMV is and why it matters

Europay, MasterCard and Visa developed these chips to make transactions more secure. Instead of processing limited data like a magstripe card, EMV technology allows dozens of pieces of non-static information to be transferred between the card, the terminal and the financial institution that processes credit card transactions for the merchant.

Chip technology mostly eliminates the risk of credit card skimming, a common practice for thieves committing credit card fraud. Fraudsters use a card-reading device to skim credit card information from a traditional magstripe card and load it onto a prepaid card. However, with an EMV chip, the card’s many pieces of data change for each transaction. Therefore, any skimmed information would be useless for the thief.

EMV cards have two major card verification methods: chip-and-PIN and chip-and-signature. Chip-and-signature — which allows you to verify your identity with a signature — is the most popular method in the U.S. due to its low cost and ease of use.

Chip-and-PIN cards, which are verified by a four- to six-digit PIN, are more widely used in Europe. Because it’s more difficult to replicate a PIN than a signature, chip-and-PIN cards are thought to be more secure, and certain overseas merchants only accept PIN-capable cards. If you’re planning on traveling internationally, you may want to consider a card with a PIN.

If your credit card isn’t chipped yet, it likely will be soon. In October 2015, a policy change called the “liability shift” will occur, placing the blame for fraudulent transactions on the issuer that doesn’t issue chipped cards and merchants that don’t accept them.

As it stands now, issuers alone are typically liable for credit card fraud, but now the blame will go to whichever party isn’t EMV capable, or it will be shared if both parties neglected to update. So while neither issuers nor merchants are being forced to upgrade to EMV technology, they have a strong financial incentive to do so.

Recommended EMV cards

If you’re in the market for a chipped card, here are some of our favorite options:

Best for travel optimizers: Chase Sapphire Preferred®

Chase Sapphire Preferred®

Apply Now on Chase's secure website

Pros

  • A large bonus
  • No foreign transaction fee
  • Cool factor - metal card
  • Rewards redemption bonus through Ultimate Rewards

Cons

  • Has annual fee
  • Best for savvy travelers

Bonus Offer

Earn 50,000 bonus points when you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening

Annual Fee

Introductory Annual Fee of $0 the first year, then $95

Intro APR Promotions

None

APR

  • APR: 16.24%-23.24% Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.24%, Variable

Card Details

  • Earn 50,000 bonus points when you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 in travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Named a 'Best Credit Card' for Travel Rewards by MONEY Magazine
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases
  • Earn 5,000 bonus points after you add the first authorized user and make a purchase in the first 3 months from account opening
  • $0 foreign transaction fees, plus chip-enabled for enhanced security and wider acceptance when used at a chip card reader
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading frequent travel programs at full value - that means 1,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points equal 1,000 partner miles/points
  • Travel and shop with confidence with premium Travel and Purchase Protection Benefits, including Trip Cancellation/Trip Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Purchase Protection and more
  • Introductory Annual Fee of $0 the first year, then $95

Travel enthusiasts with a penchant for a good deal will love the Chase Sapphire Preferred®. It gives 2X points on travel and dining, and 1 point on every $1 spent on everything else. There’s also a sweet sign-up bonus: Earn 50,000 bonus points when you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.

A point is only as good as its value. In this case, a point is worth 1.25 cents (the industry standard is 1 cent) when used to book travel through the Chase Ultimate Rewards website. You can also transfer your points to one of Chase’s partner’s frequent flier programs. If you’re mile-savvy, you may be able to get an even better deal this way.

The Chase Sapphire Preferred® has an Introductory Annual Fee of $0 the first year, then $95, and no foreign transaction fees.

Best for cooks & commuters: Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

Apply Now on American Express's secure website

Pros

  • Leading cash back rewards for groceries
  • Sign-up bonus
  • 0% APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Cons

  • Has annual fee - but if you spend more than $27/week the rewards offset the fees
  • American Express isn’t accepted at as many merchants as Visa or MasterCard

Bonus Offer

Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.

Annual Fee

$75

Intro APR Promotions

0% on Purchases for 15 months and 0% on Balance Transfers for 15 months

APR

  • APR: 13.24%-22.24% Variable
  • Penalty APR: Up to 29.49%, Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.49%, Variable

Card Details

  • Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.
  • Earn Cash Back: 6% U.S. supermarkets up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 3% U.S. gas stations & select U.S. dept stores, 1% other purchases. Terms and limitations apply.
  • With the Blue Cash Preferred® Card, you can start earning cash back. No rotating reward categories. No enrollment required.
  • Cash back is received in the form of Reward Dollars that can be redeemed as a statement credit. Cash back is earned only on eligible purchases.
  • 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, then a variable rate, currently 13.24% to 22.24%, based on your creditworthiness and other factors.
  • Terms and limitations apply.
  • View Rates and Fees

Home cooks and frequent drivers will appreciate the extra rewards provided by the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express. It offers 6% back on grocery store purchases (up to $6,000 spent annually), 3% back at U.S. gas stations and certain department stores, and 1% back on everything else. The card also comes with a cash sign-up bonus: Get $150 back after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months. You will receive $150 back in the form of a statement credit.

The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express has a $75 annual fee and foreign transaction fees of 2.7%. The card has an introductory APR offer of 0% on Purchases for 15 months and 0% on Balance Transfers for 15 months, and then the ongoing APR of 13.24%-22.24% Variable.

Best for flexible fliers: Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card

The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card is a great card if you want to book travel your way. It offers 2 miles on every dollar spent, plus a sign-up bonus: Enjoy a one-time bonus of 40,000 miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months, equal to $400 in travel. You can use your miles to book travel through the Capital One platform, or use the Purchase Eraser feature to get a statement credit for travel booked elsewhere.

The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card has an annual fee of $0 intro for first year; $59 after that and no foreign transaction fees.

Best for online shoppers: Discover it®- Double Cash Back your first year

Discover it®- Double Cash Back your first year

Apply Now on Discover's secure website

Pros

  • Bonus cash back categories
  • No annual fee
  • 0% on purchases for 12 months and 0% on balance transfers for 12 months
  • No foreign transaction fee

Bonus Offer

We'll DOUBLE all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year. So if you earned $101 cash back, we'll double it to $202—Automatically. Only for new cardmembers.*

Annual Fee

$0

Intro APR Promotions

0% on purchases for 12 months and 0% on balance transfers for 12 months

APR

  • APR: 11.24% – 23.24% Variable*
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.24%, Variable

Card Details

  • We'll DOUBLE all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year. So if you earned $101 cash back, we'll double it to $202—Automatically. Only for new cardmembers.*
  • 5% cash back in categories that change each quarter like gas, restaurants, home improvement stores and more -up to the quarterly maximum when you sign up.* 1% cash back on all other purchases.
  • 0% intro APR* on purchases & balance transfers for 12 months—then a variable purchase APR applies, currently 11.24% – 23.24%. A 3% fee applies to each transferred balance.
  • Freeze It℠ on/off switch lets you prevent new purchases, cash advances & balance transfers on misplaced cards in seconds by mobile app & online.* Plus get 100% U.S.-based service.
  • Track your recent FICO® Credit Scores for free in one easy-to-read chart on monthly statements & online.*
  • No annual fee.* No overlimit fee. No foreign transaction fee. No late fee on first late payment & paying late won't raise your APR.*
  • Each Discover purchase is monitored. If it's unusual, you're alerted by e-mail, phone or text and you're never responsible for unauthorized purchases on your Discover card.
  • Click "Apply Now". *See rates, rewards, FICO® Credit Score terms & other information.

Frequent online shoppers should check out the Discover it®- Double Cash Back your first year. It offers 5% back on rotating bonus categories on up to $1,500 spent each quarter, and 1% back on everything else.

This card is great for online shoppers for two reasons. First, the bonus categories in the fourth quarter historically include online purchases, so you may be able to get 5% back on up to $1,500 of online spending between October and December. Second, the Discover Deals bonus mall is one of the best in the industry. It offers 5% to 20% back at more than 200 online retailers.

The Discover it®- Double Cash Back your first year has an annual fee of $0 and no foreign transaction fees. There’s an introductory APR of 0% on purchases for 12 months and 0% on balance transfers for 12 months, and then the ongoing APR of 11.24% – 23.24% Variable.

Best for world travelers: Wells Fargo Propel World American Express

Wells Fargo Propel World American Express

Apply Now on Wells Fargo's secure website

Pros

  • 0% for 12 mos on transfers
  • No foreign transaction fee

Cons

  • Has annual fee
  • Needs excellent credit

Bonus Offer

40,000 points when you spend $3,000 in net purchases in the first 3 months

Annual Fee

$0 the first year, then $175

Intro APR Promotions

Purchase: 0% for 12 mos

Transfer: 0% for 12 mos

APR

  • Min APR: 13.99%, Variable
  • Max APR: 21.99%, Variable
  • Cash Advance APR: 23.99%, Variable

Card Details

  • No foreign currency conversion fees
  • Up to $100 per year in reimbursements toward incidental airline charges
  • Complimentary room upgrades and more from the Luxury Hotel Program
  • 3X points on Airlines, 2X points on Hotels, 1X point on all other net purchases (purchases minus returns/credits)
  • $0 Introductory Annual Fee for the first year, $175 for each year after that.

If your travels take you overseas, you may want to consider a card that’s PIN-capable, like the Wells Fargo Propel World American Express. It gives cardholders 3X points on airlines, 2X points on hotels and 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases. On top of that, it boasts a sign-up bonus worth talking about — you’ll earn 40,000 points when you spend $3,000 in net purchases in the first 3 months.

The card’s annual fee is waived the first year and $175 every year thereafter, and there are no foreign transaction fees. Plus, there’s an airline incidental fee of up to $100 per year, reimbursable via statement credit.

How to use your EMV credit card

The process for using an EMV credit card is different than using a magstripe card, but you’ll catch on quickly. Instead of swiping, insert your card into the terminal and leave it there. Then follow the prompts of the terminal screen and wait to remove your card until the receipt begins printing. Just be careful not to leave your card behind.

It may take some time to get used to using your EMV card, but the extra security the card provides will be well worth the transition from swiping to “dipping.”

List of American EMV chip-and-signature credit cards

Current as of June 26, 2015

Here are the personal U.S. credit cards with EMV compatibility from the biggest card issuers:

If your current card is on the list, but it isn’t chipped, you can contact your issuer and request a new card. Issuers may not preemptively send out chipped cards to existing cardmembers until the liability shift occurs, but they will issue them to cardholders who ask.

Worldwide EMV adoption rates by region

Not entirely sure you need an EMV credit card? Here are EMV adoption numbers for regions around the world. As the data demonstrates, the EMV system has the strongest presence in western Europe, which includes the likes of Germany, Spain, France, Italy and England. While useful for adventures anywhere around the globe, chip-with-signature cards are absolutely vital to the success of Europe-bound travelers.

EMV Credit Card Adoption Rates
Region Number Percent
Western Europe & Greenland 833M 83.5%
Eastern Europe 153M 40.4%
Canada, Latin America & the Caribbean 544M 59.5%
Africa & the Middle East 116M 50.5%
Asia Pacific 1,676M 25.4%

Source: EMVCo, reporting on Q4 of 2014

Worldwide acceptance: Visa, MasterCard, Discover or American Express?

Visa and MasterCard are the two most widely accepted payment networks in the world, so most travelers won’t notice a difference in acceptance rates. However, Discover and American Express are accepted by fewer merchants in fewer countries. And while Discover happens to be the most prevalent payment network in China, those who travel to other countries may have a hard time finding someone to accept their Discover card or AmEx card.

Acceptance rate isn’t the only factor to consider; foreign transaction fees can make a huge difference. Many cards tack on fees of around 3% on every international purchase. Visa, MasterCard and American Express all offer cards with and without these fees, while Discover waives the fee on all of its cards. Check out the Nerds’ top cards with no foreign transaction fees if you travel or shop overseas.

Each network offers its own unique collection of travel benefits, like purchase protection, roadside assistance and rental car insurance. Visa and MasterCard offer similar perks, check your card benefits for details. American Express offers bonus benefits, including superior purchase and return protection. Discover falls short on rental coverage, because it doesn’t offer loss of use coverage on rental cars, but the issuer has recently added several benefits — including return and purchase protection.

Erin El Issa is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: erin@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @Erin_Lindsay17.


Image via iStock.

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  • Rtrugman

    ATM fee?

  • Mar

    Arent’ there any credit cards that have an “EMV” chip and also do not have foreign transaction fees? of course, the ideal would also not ahve an annual fee, but am I asking for too much? Mar

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      Hi there,
      There are a number of EMV cards that have no foreign transaction fee, including the British AIrways Visa, the JPMorgan Select, and the Hyatt credit card.

  • brosen

    Wells Fargo Platinum is no longer available with chip. Had “too many problems”.

    • JDM

      Confimed – I just called Wells Fargo and they would not issue a card with EMV.

  • Laxmanbh

    I received my Bank of America Travel Rewards card with EMV chip today. I see that Bofa updated their website too.
    https://www.bankofamerica.com/credit-cards/products/bankamericard-travel-rewards-credit-card.go?cid=2081332&po=G7

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      Thanks for letting us know! We’ve added it to our list.

    • Ryan Egan

      I’m curious to know if this is truly chip and pin or chip and signature?

      I recently returned from a trip to the UK this Summer (attended the Olympics – which was sponsored by VISA btw) and was infuriated with all the train ticketing/kiosk payment problems I encountered.

      • redwriter

        This card is only chip. I got one this summer and the rep told me they don’t offer chip and PIN, or at least they didn’t at the time. My card worked in the kiosk at the train station in France, but Italy also required the PIN, so I ended up walking a few miles back to my hotel since the ticket office was closed.

        • Margarita Y

          you can request the PIN and they mail it to you…so you could have it before you left for your trip

          • Alex’s Experiences

            That does NOT make it “chip and PIN” because that PIN is for online verification ONLY (typically cash advances) and signature is the priority.

  • http://blog.sekurecardservices.com/ Jeff

    The EMV chip card is on it’s way of becoming the international security standard for credit card processing. Credit card fraud is one of the biggest component making up the interchange rate and EMV chip card considered best fraud deterrent to date. With so many US merchants complaining of the high interchange rates on a payment vehicle that makes up over 47% of transaction payment why are US merchants and banks so reluctant to adopt them?

  • http://blog.sekurecardservices.com/ Jeff

    The EMV chip card is on it’s way of becoming the international security standard for credit card processing. Credit card fraud is one of the biggest component making up the interchange rate and EMV chip card considered best fraud deterrent to date. With so many US merchants complaining of the high interchange rates on a payment vehicle that makes up over 47% of transaction payment why are US merchants and banks so reluctant to adopt them?

  • Goodgator2000

    It would be helpful if you could clarify which ones are Chip and PIN vs Chip and Signature as you did for the Andrews GlobeTrek (it is not the only Chip and PIN on the list). thanks!

  • Goodgator2000

    It would be helpful if you could clarify which ones are Chip and PIN vs Chip and Signature as you did for the Andrews GlobeTrek (it is not the only Chip and PIN on the list). thanks!

  • Paul

    And we walk around thinking the U.S. is so advanced! American Express sent me a EMC card, but alas does not work in most Europe kiosks

  • Paul

    And we walk around thinking the U.S. is so advanced! American Express sent me a EMC card, but alas does not work in most Europe kiosks

  • Alli774

    Merrill has a couple as well. Anyhow know if HSBC has them in USA?

  • Alli774

    Merrill has a couple as well. Anyhow know if HSBC has them in USA?

  • http://twitter.com/_G8 Mike B.

    Also BankAmericard (Bank of America) Cash Rewards, upon request though

  • http://twitter.com/_G8 Mike B.

    Also BankAmericard (Bank of America) Cash Rewards, upon request though

  • PapaSmurf

    Diners Club is Chip and Pin…issued by Harris Bank

  • PapaSmurf

    Diners Club is Chip and Pin…issued by Harris Bank

  • Neil

    I’m looking for a card to use regularly around Europe the next several years. I’ve got status on United and Hilton, so the BA and Hyatt Cards don’t appeal to me. Any chance UA gets an EMV card or the HHonors Reserve drops their FTF?

    • Carmen Leung

      Your best bet would be to get an amex and then get amex to issue you an european based amex.

  • Neil

    I’m looking for a card to use regularly around Europe the next several years. I’ve got status on United and Hilton, so the BA and Hyatt Cards don’t appeal to me. Any chance UA gets an EMV card or the HHonors Reserve drops their FTF?

  • sle3364

    hi. other than andrews credit union, which credit card offer chip and PIN cards… I a going to Italy end of September and will be using the trains. I am so annoyed that my ZMEX platnium does not have chip and PIN… what do we pay the high fees for!!!

  • sle3364

    hi. other than andrews credit union, which credit card offer chip and PIN cards… I a going to Italy end of September and will be using the trains. I am so annoyed that my ZMEX platnium does not have chip and PIN… what do we pay the high fees for!!!

  • Karry3223

    Wells Fargo Private Bank By invitation visa signature has chip now, for past month. it is also a true chip and PIN, not like most which are chip and signature, which is almost useless in Europe…needs pin for rail stations, gas stations, etc.

  • Karry3223

    Wells Fargo Private Bank By invitation visa signature has chip now, for past month. it is also a true chip and PIN, not like most which are chip and signature, which is almost useless in Europe…needs pin for rail stations, gas stations, etc.

  • trhattan

    Just got back from Iceland. My Chase Hyatt Visa card with chip & pin worked fine at the unmanned N1 gas stations there. I had to call Chase to get a pin assigned after I received the card in July. Chase customer service thought that it would only work as a chip and signature card.

  • trhattan

    Just got back from Iceland. My Chase Hyatt Visa card with chip & pin worked fine at the unmanned N1 gas stations there. I had to call Chase to get a pin assigned after I received the card in July. Chase customer service thought that it would only work as a chip and signature card.

  • Mikemd

    I thought Capitol One doesn’t charge foreign transaction fee?

    • Alex’s Experiences

      They don’t issue EMV cards in the USA

    • dizzylucy

      I got a Capital One Venture card last year, for the no foreign transaction fee since I was planning on traveling abroad. That’s a nice feature, but doesn’t do much good if the card doesn’t work and you can’t make purchases- which is the exact problem we had in France. Because it doesn’t have the chip, many places couldn’t process it, which was extremely frustrating since the card is advertised for foreign travel. I ended up having to use my bank card, which in the end cost me fees. When we finally did have a vendor able to swipe the Capital One card, it didn’t work because they declined it as a potential fraudulent charge – despite me notifying them prior to my trip. Overall it was a frustrating experience, and I’m going to get something different before my next international trip.

  • Mikemd

    I thought Capitol One doesn’t charge foreign transaction fee?

  • Mikemd

    I thought Capitol One doesn’t charge foreign transaction fee?

  • Ryan Egan

    I agree with @d85dd88de71f3108f8df222872db44e7:disqus, I think it would be very helpful to identify which cards on the list are chip and pin as opposed to chip and signature.

  • Ryan Egan

    I agree with @d85dd88de71f3108f8df222872db44e7:disqus, I think it would be very helpful to identify which cards on the list are chip and pin as opposed to chip and signature.

  • Patrick

    I have a Bank of America Cash rewards card. I contact customer service
    and they told me my card was eligible for a chip. It is suppose to be
    in the mail.

  • Patrick

    I have a Bank of America Cash rewards card. I contact customer service
    and they told me my card was eligible for a chip. It is suppose to be
    in the mail.

  • Phil

    USAA Federal Savings Bank is now issuing true chip-and-pin Mastercards (not chip-and-sig). USAA charges a 1% foreign transaction fee but no annual fee.

  • Phil

    USAA Federal Savings Bank is now issuing true chip-and-pin Mastercards (not chip-and-sig). USAA charges a 1% foreign transaction fee but no annual fee.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1508790005 facebook-1508790005

    Bank of America Cash Rewards is Chip & Signature now; just got mine in the mail yesterday (it came with the chip automatically, I didn’t have to ask. Though, that may be because they know I travel internationally)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1508790005 facebook-1508790005

    Bank of America Cash Rewards is Chip & Signature now; just got mine in the mail yesterday (it came with the chip automatically, I didn’t have to ask. Though, that may be because they know I travel internationally)

  • Jim

    For European travel, you need a chip-and-PIN card. A chip-and-signature card is basically useless since terminals cannot process them. Cashiers can process them manually, but then they can process magnetic strip cards manually as well.

  • Jim

    For European travel, you need a chip-and-PIN card. A chip-and-signature card is basically useless since terminals cannot process them. Cashiers can process them manually, but then they can process magnetic strip cards manually as well.

  • Brooks Hurd

    My experience in Europe is that businesses which do significant tourist business will accept magnetic strip only credit cards. Tourist restaurants and hotels are no problem. Local restaurants, stores, gas stations, Dutch trains, etc will only accept chip and pin cards. Do not be fooled by the card readers which have both the magnetic strip and chip readers. In most cases the strip reader is non-functional.
    After having been frustrated in Europe on 3 business trips in the past 6 months, because I only had magnetic strip cards, I decided that I needed a credit card with a chip and pin. I have been a customer of Wells Fargo for more than 20 years, but ran into nothing but frustration trying to sign up for a WF Visa Signature card with the chip and pin. I then went to CITI and found that they offered several chip and pin cards. I signed up for the HHonors Reserve Visa Signature card on line. The rest of the process involved one call to confirm my agreement to process the application. The card arrived within 2 weeks as promised.
    This card is a chip and PIN card. Your PIN is sent separately. I was very pleased with CITI’s service.

  • Brooks Hurd

    My experience in Europe is that businesses which do significant tourist business will accept magnetic strip only credit cards. Tourist restaurants and hotels are no problem. Local restaurants, stores, gas stations, Dutch trains, etc will only accept chip and pin cards. Do not be fooled by the card readers which have both the magnetic strip and chip readers. In most cases the strip reader is non-functional.
    After having been frustrated in Europe on 3 business trips in the past 6 months, because I only had magnetic strip cards, I decided that I needed a credit card with a chip and pin. I have been a customer of Wells Fargo for more than 20 years, but ran into nothing but frustration trying to sign up for a WF Visa Signature card with the chip and pin. I then went to CITI and found that they offered several chip and pin cards. I signed up for the HHonors Reserve Visa Signature card on line. The rest of the process involved one call to confirm my agreement to process the application. The card arrived within 2 weeks as promised.
    This card is a chip and PIN card. Your PIN is sent separately. I was very pleased with CITI’s service.

  • Vince

    I have been trying to get a State Department FCU card for 2 months now. It has been an excruciating process, supplying multiple copies of tax returns, etc. I’m about ready to pay for a Hyatt card. They still haven’t gotten my funds transfer to work yet, either.

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      I’m sorry you’re having such difficulty! You can also consider getting a no annual fee Citi card and asking for an EMV chip.

  • Vince

    I have been trying to get a State Department FCU card for 2 months now. It has been an excruciating process, supplying multiple copies of tax returns, etc. I’m about ready to pay for a Hyatt card. They still haven’t gotten my funds transfer to work yet, either.

  • Paul Wells

    The problem with list like this is that they go out of date very quickly and anyone using them to find a real chip & pin card is going to waste a lot of time contacting the companies and discovering that they either never offered one, or tried it and stopped.

    For example Bank of America and Chase only offer chip & signature.

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      Hi Paul,

      Unless otherwise noted on this list, the cards are chip and signature, not chip and PIN – sorry for any confusion!

      • Paul Wells

        Good that you’ve changed the title to reflect what the article is really about. Anyone with a signature card should be prepared for plenty of blank looks when they’re used and the reader prints something rather than asking for a PIN.

    • Lynn Nguyen

      Agree with Paul. I was an another site that listed ‘chip and pin’ and what they really meant was ‘chip and signature.’ If you’re a traveler the security stuff matters, but a close second is time. If I have to sign either way, I have a hard time seeing the added security benefits of the chip. I’d rather just wait till everything was fully rolled out, or just get a foreign card.

  • Paul Wells

    The problem with list like this is that they go out of date very quickly and anyone using them to find a real chip & pin card is going to waste a lot of time contacting the companies and discovering that they either never offered one, or tried it and stopped.

    For example Bank of America and Chase only offer chip & signature.

  • David R

    I recently traveled to Scotland and used a Citi chip and sig card at a Tesco gas pump kiosk and it worked fine. Granted this was in Edinburgh and near the airport, but still good to know that it worked even thought don’t have a PIN. Earlier in the trip a friend could not buy petrol in Dublin with any of his three non-chip US credit cards, but I wasn’t there to try mine.

  • David R

    I recently traveled to Scotland and used a Citi chip and sig card at a Tesco gas pump kiosk and it worked fine. Granted this was in Edinburgh and near the airport, but still good to know that it worked even thought don’t have a PIN. Earlier in the trip a friend could not buy petrol in Dublin with any of his three non-chip US credit cards, but I wasn’t there to try mine.

  • Deb B

    Whats the best option for a student with bad credit for a chip card to travel to Germany? Are there any prepaid or secured options?

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      If you’re a student, I’d suggest the Capital One Journey Student Card – it has no foreign transaction fee so you won’t get slammed with a 3% charge on every dollar you spend there.

      • http://andrewmock.com/ Andrew Mock

        That’s not a chip card.

        • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

          You’re entirely right, Andrew, I apologize. I don’t know of any student-specific EMV cards – perhaps a parent can co-sign an EMV card from State Department FCU? The Travelex prepaid debit card tends to be pretty fee-heavy, so I wouldn’t recommend it.

  • Deb B

    Whats the best option for a student with bad credit for a chip card to travel to Germany? Are there any prepaid or secured options?

  • SuperKirby

    Is there a reason why big banks (Chase, Amex, BofA, Citi) won’t make CHIP & PIN cards and they make Chip & Signatures instead?

  • SuperKirby

    Is there a reason why big banks (Chase, Amex, BofA, Citi) won’t make CHIP & PIN cards and they make Chip & Signatures instead?

  • Fanda Zeng

    Dude, you do not know Discover card can also run on Union Pay JCB and Dinner’s club network? It can be used more than this ridiculous list.

  • Fanda Zeng

    Dude, you do not know Discover card can also run on Union Pay JCB and Dinner’s club network? It can be used more than this ridiculous list.

  • Tod Greene

    i’m asking for a list of retailers in the US and by the way what is EMV?

  • Tod Greene

    i’m asking for a list of retailers in the US and by the way what is EMV?

  • Leo Driscoll

    Will EMV work for all retailers in US ?

  • Leo Driscoll

    Will EMV work for all retailers in US ?

  • HR

    EMV is the group that came up with the chip card 15 years ago, it stands
    for Europay Mastercard Visa. These cards are also known as Chip and
    Pin and another version is Chip and Signature. Chip and Pin is a much
    better option! A Pin is much harder to guess than using a fake
    signature. I have had credit cards for many years and have NEVER had a
    merchant check my signature with the one on my card! The problem in
    the US is the chicken and the egg. The chip cards cost $1.10 and stripe
    cards cost ten cents. Credit card company’s don’t want to buy these
    new cards until merchants have the terminals to process the chip cards.
    The merchant has to purchase new credit card terminals which are more
    expensive. Hopefully after the Target/Neiman Marcus disaster this more
    secure system will start to be implemented. We can all help to get this
    rolling by calling our credit card company’s and requesting Chip and
    Pin (or EMV cards), and then requesting that merchants upgrade their
    terminals. The new US issued EMV cards also have magnetic strips so they
    will work with both technologies. A bonus is that you will then have
    world credit cards that will work in Europe and many other places.

    • Bruno Schwartz

      Liability shifts starting in 2015 will gradually force merchants over to the EMV system. But, you will not see widescale adoption of Chip and Pin by U.S. merchants or issuers. The ball is already rolling for U.S. EMV deployment and that system is built around Chip and Signature.

  • HR

    EMV is the group that came up with the chip card 15 years ago, it stands
    for Europay Mastercard Visa. These cards are also known as Chip and
    Pin and another version is Chip and Signature. Chip and Pin is a much
    better option! A Pin is much harder to guess than using a fake
    signature. I have had credit cards for many years and have NEVER had a
    merchant check my signature with the one on my card! The problem in
    the US is the chicken and the egg. The chip cards cost $1.10 and stripe
    cards cost ten cents. Credit card company’s don’t want to buy these
    new cards until merchants have the terminals to process the chip cards.
    The merchant has to purchase new credit card terminals which are more
    expensive. Hopefully after the Target/Neiman Marcus disaster this more
    secure system will start to be implemented. We can all help to get this
    rolling by calling our credit card company’s and requesting Chip and
    Pin (or EMV cards), and then requesting that merchants upgrade their
    terminals. The new US issued EMV cards also have magnetic strips so they
    will work with both technologies. A bonus is that you will then have
    world credit cards that will work in Europe and many other places.

  • Locke42

    Is there anyway to change a card over from Chip and Signature to Chip and PIN?

    • Bruno Schwartz

      No. The only way to get a true chip and pin card is through one of the very few U.S. issuers (e.g. United Nations Credit Union) or through a foreign account.

  • Locke42

    Is there anyway to change a card over from Chip and Signature to Chip and PIN?

  • Gary Krysta

    Lets pretend I am a small business owner of convenience stores and gas stations. The lease on my card readers is up for renewal on Oct of 2014. I don’t want to upgrade the old system until the new readers are available. Where can I currently buy or lease the new EMV credit card readers?

    • C2C Enterprises, LLC

      You should not be leasing equipment in the 1st place – you are paying for that equipment 6 times over!!!

      Email me – I’ll walk you through the best channels

  • Gary Krysta

    Lets pretend I am a small business owner of convenience stores and gas stations. The lease on my card readers is up for renewal on Oct of 2014. I don’t want to upgrade the old system until the new readers are available. Where can I currently buy or lease the new EMV credit card readers?

  • Lonr Lonr

    What companies make these chips and the software?

  • Lonr Lonr

    What companies make these chips and the software?

  • BocaNY

    I called Citibank about this when I realized that my debit card would not work in half of the atms in the country I was in and everyone else’s did. They said that for some reason mastercard would not give them the go ahead to add a chip to debit cards. But then he said something about being able to get a chip, I think a paypal thing or something, but that it would only work in the US. Either way I was left frustrated and confused. I was without money in a town in the mountains that had only 2 atms and neither would read my card because it didn’t have a chip. I had to borrow money from someone I had just met to get back. America needs to catch up.

  • BocaNY

    I called Citibank about this when I realized that my debit card would not work in half of the atms in the country I was in and everyone else’s did. They said that for some reason mastercard would not give them the go ahead to add a chip to debit cards. But then he said something about being able to get a chip, I think a paypal thing or something, but that it would only work in the US. Either way I was left frustrated and confused. I was without money in a town in the mountains that had only 2 atms and neither would read my card because it didn’t have a chip. I had to borrow money from someone I had just met to get back. America needs to catch up.

  • Drew

    I tried using Discover in the Dominican Republic. They asked what is this. No one accepted it. Shame since their is no FTF. Discover is still hit and miss.

  • Drew

    I tried using Discover in the Dominican Republic. They asked what is this. No one accepted it. Shame since their is no FTF. Discover is still hit and miss.

  • H Bosch

    US issued EMV cards (all) have signature over pin priority. What this
    means in practice when you are in Europe for example is that places with
    a card reader that expect you to punch in your PIN because they see the
    chip on your card become flummoxed when they wait and wait and then it
    says ‘get signature’, meanwhile people behind you in line are getting
    antsy. They claim that you can use the PIN at unattended card readers at
    gas stations and toll booths. This is abjectly false. 10/10 tries to do
    that this month resulted in failure. The EMV cards issued are useless,
    maybe worse. Choosing the signature over PIN neuters the card, and card
    companies are stupid for issuing them.

  • H Bosch

    US issued EMV cards (all) have signature over pin priority. What this
    means in practice when you are in Europe for example is that places with
    a card reader that expect you to punch in your PIN because they see the
    chip on your card become flummoxed when they wait and wait and then it
    says ‘get signature’, meanwhile people behind you in line are getting
    antsy. They claim that you can use the PIN at unattended card readers at
    gas stations and toll booths. This is abjectly false. 10/10 tries to do
    that this month resulted in failure. The EMV cards issued are useless,
    maybe worse. Choosing the signature over PIN neuters the card, and card
    companies are stupid for issuing them.

  • Beatrice

    Hello, I am moving to France for work for one year and am trying to determine what will be the best card to use both in France and abroad. My top considerations are a card with no foreign transaction fees, EMV technology and the best possible rewards. Your lists have been extremely helpful in narrowing down the choices but was wondering if you could offer your opinion for what you think is the best choice? Thanks!!!

    • Garrett

      In France, a lot of times, a card with a chip which requires a signature (chip-and-signature) isn’t sufficient. I was regularly declined on automated transactions (trains, kiosks, etc…) because I didn’t have a pin number to enter after you insert the card. The Barclaycard Arrival Plus offers a pin number, as well as waived foreign transaction fees, and 2.2% cash back in the form of miles redeemable for travel expenses (as well as other things at a significantly diminished rate of return). Chase Sapphire Preferred is supposed to come with a pin later this year. I would go with either or both. Amex is kind of useless in my experience (though I have a few for other reasons).

      • Beatrice

        I went with the Barclay Arrival Plus card – it seems to be the best overall choice. Thanks so much for your advice!!!

        • Garrett

          Great! I think you’ll be happy with it. I am. Just a heads up, when you redeem for travel expenses, you can only apply a redemption once per transaction. So if you bought a plane ticket for $2000, and you apply the equivalent of $500 credit, you can only do that once. You can’t build up more points and apply another mileage credit to that same flight. Their customer service is also really great. Good luck!

        • Garrett

          …oh, and you might consider adding the Chase Sapphire Preferred as well. The bonus points that you get are really valuable, and can be transferred to Hyatt, which is (arguably) the best way to get good value out of them.

      • Carmen Leung

        Depending on how long you are staying, it may be better to get amex to issue you a american amex based on your us credit history and then afterwards request for amex to issue you a france based amex so you can use that to spring board to a french based mastercard or visa for the duration of your work period. If anything if you do run into issues regarding pin and chip transactions, your amex can be your backup plan if the retailer takes amex.

  • Beatrice

    Hello, I am moving to France for work for one year and am trying to determine what will be the best card to use both in France and abroad. My top considerations are a card with no foreign transaction fees, EMV technology and the best possible rewards. Your lists have been extremely helpful in narrowing down the choices but was wondering if you could offer your opinion for what you think is the best choice? Thanks!!!

  • Kara

    My fiance and I will be moving to China for a year and we want a travel rewards card to buy our tickets and use in China. We are looking at the Capital One Venture Card, Barclay Arrival Plus card, and Chase Sapphire Preferred card, Capital One is our top choice, but doesn’t have the EMV chip. How important is the chip for transactions in Asia? Thanks!

    • DC

      not needed in asia.

    • Carmen Leung

      no need, china is swipe and pay as well. No such thing as pin and chip only pin and signature

  • Kara

    My fiance and I will be moving to China for a year and we want a travel rewards card to buy our tickets and use in China. We are looking at the Capital One Venture Card, Barclay Arrival Plus card, and Chase Sapphire Preferred card, Capital One is our top choice, but doesn’t have the EMV chip. How important is the chip for transactions in Asia? Thanks!

  • jrlevine

    HSBC now puts chips in their high end Premier, Advance, and Platinum cards. The flyer they sent claim they’re chip+pin outside the US. I’ll find out on a trip next week.

    • http://mikelward.com/ Mikel

      Any word?

  • jrlevine

    HSBC now puts chips in their high end Premier, Advance, and Platinum cards. The flyer they sent claim they’re chip+pin outside the US. I’ll find out on a trip next week.

  • Steve Thomas

    If the banks were forced to pay the person who’s card was hacked 500.00 dollars for their in-convience and wasted time they would probably change over to the chip faster

  • Steve Thomas

    If the banks were forced to pay the person who’s card was hacked 500.00 dollars for their in-convience and wasted time they would probably change over to the chip faster

  • Bloemberg

    For real security, at least as far as the cardholder is concerned, the only thing that makes sense is an EMV card with the PIN feature rather than signature. That’s not so much because signatures can be forged. In the USA, since no cashier even looks for a signature on the back of the card anymore, let alone comparing the card signature with the charge slip signature. All the cashier cares for is ensuring that the charge slip is signed. In Europe, almost every place where I tried to use my EMV card refused to accept it because they were set up only for PINs. As a result, their sales are handled much faster at their cashier terminals than in the U.S., with enhanced security for the customer. In many places, and not only at gas pumps, there were no cashiers at all – you simply scan your purchases, swipe your card, enter your PIN, and you are done.

    After returning home, I discovered that most of the U.S. banks did not want the hassle (and especially the expense) of replacing merchants’ card machines with updated versions that have PIN keypads for customer entry. Maybe the EMV cards with signatures protect the merchants and the banks, but for us consumers they are no more secure than our existing magnetic cards.

    The so-called PIN numbers that have always been available for use with existing charge cards are not EMV-type PINs. They are only for purposes of using charge cards to borrow cash – at exorbitant interest rates. They make no sense for most of us who have ATM or bank debit cards.

    • Donald Wilson

      It’s misleading to assert that EMV cards are no more secure than existing cards. Yes, during the ramp up to an upgraded system where EMV will be ubiquitous there are similar risks as non-EMV cards. But as the deployment speeds up and more consumers use the EMV method, they will become safer. Just like Debit transactions, the EMV card is useless if the pin is not known. This is far safer than swipe transactions where anyone can draw a squiggle on a terminal assuming the transaction is higher than some no-signature-required threshold. Because of this, when I travel abroad the only card I carry is my EMV enabled USAA MasterCard.

      Only in the USA are the banks on the hook for fraud. Everywhere else in the world it’s the consumer or the merchant depending on who’s at fault. 99% of the merchants outside of the US will not accept a swipe transaction because of this. EMV transactions are WAY safer than standard US swipe transactions.

      • Carmen Leung

        Or they can accept it but require you to produce id everytime you use the card.

      • Emmanuel Eisenheim

        Yeah, It couldn’t have been said better. My banks have already mailed chip/pin cards to me when the magnetic ones were close to expire and the last magnetic card i had I called the bank to ask for a chip one, and they sent out one free of charge even though the magnetic one was 2 years away from its expiration date. We are so fking lucky in this country to not be on the hook for fraud and to get things done so easily. It’s always somebody else who pays the broken glass except for the average consumer. But now that fraud has become so widespread, there is no need to keep magnetic technology around. The question now is whether to use chip/signature or chip/pin. I have both.

      • Nearmsp

        yes, but US is not using Chip and Pin. It is Chip and Signature. So if a room mate takes the card and does a swipe and signs, where is the “security” of EMV??

  • Bloemberg

    For real security, at least as far as the cardholder is concerned, the only thing that makes sense is an EMV card with the PIN feature rather than signature. That’s not so much because signatures can be forged. In the USA, since no cashier even looks for a signature on the back of the card anymore, let alone comparing the card signature with the charge slip signature. All the cashier cares for is ensuring that the charge slip is signed. In Europe, almost every place where I tried to use my EMV card refused to accept it because they were set up only for PINs. As a result, their sales are handled much faster at their cashier terminals than in the U.S., with enhanced security for the customer. In many places, and not only at gas pumps, there were no cashiers at all – you simply scan your purchases, swipe your card, enter your PIN, and you are done.

    After returning home, I discovered that most of the U.S. banks did not want the hassle (and especially the expense) of replacing merchants’ card machines with updated versions that have PIN keypads for customer entry. Maybe the EMV cards with signatures protect the merchants and the banks, but for us consumers they are no more secure than our existing magnetic cards.

    The so-called PIN numbers that have always been available for use with existing charge cards are not EMV-type PINs. They are only for purposes of using charge cards to borrow cash – at exorbitant interest rates. They make no sense for most of us who have ATM or bank debit cards.

  • MoonDogg

    “Of the four networks, Discover comes in last–no loss of use coverage on rental cars, no concierge service and no purchase or return protection.”

    This is not true:

    https://www.discover.com/credit-cards/member-benefits/

  • MoonDogg

    “Of the four networks, Discover comes in last–no loss of use coverage on rental cars, no concierge service and no purchase or return protection.”

    This is not true:

    https://www.discover.com/credit-cards/member-benefits/

  • rconnor

    By the way, the Andrews Federal Credit Union card does have a chip and does have a PIN, however, the default will still be for chip and signature. I learned this at a grocery store in Denmark that will not accept signatures (I have been here before and knew what to expect, so I went through with the steps to get this chip and PIN card). Unfortunately, it still doesn’t appear to work like the European cards do – at coffee shops and restaurants, a receipt is printed after you stick the chip into the handheld machine. Thankfully some places do accept signatures (and if you call Visa or Mastercard they will tell you every merchant has to accept signatures, and maybe in theory, but of course not in practice). As it was explained to me from the representative from AFCU, the transaction has to be run as debit (I assume this would be considered “online” by American terms). I have asked the cashiers if they are able to run as debit, but they said they have no control over the transaction type. Any solutions to this? Or any new information @disqus_fnrOyK5D58:disqus, @disqus_SxQF5kONUE:disqus, or @msupp:disqus?

  • rconnor

    By the way, the Andrews Federal Credit Union card does have a chip and does have a PIN, however, the default will still be for chip and signature. I learned this at a grocery store in Denmark that will not accept signatures (I have been here before and knew what to expect, so I went through with the steps to get this chip and PIN card). Unfortunately, it still doesn’t appear to work like the European cards do – at coffee shops and restaurants, a receipt is printed after you stick the chip into the handheld machine. Thankfully some places do accept signatures (and if you call Visa or Mastercard they will tell you every merchant has to accept signatures, and maybe in theory, but of course not in practice). As it was explained to me from the representative from AFCU, the transaction has to be run as debit (I assume this would be considered “online” by American terms). I have asked the cashiers if they are able to run as debit, but they said they have no control over the transaction type. Any solutions to this? Or any new information @disqus_fnrOyK5D58:disqus, @disqus_SxQF5kONUE:disqus, or @msupp:disqus?

  • michael

    Both Chase Freedom Visa and Amex Blue Cash Everyday has chip + signature by request.

  • michael

    Both Chase Freedom Visa and Amex Blue Cash Everyday has chip + signature by request.

  • Lee Nicholson

    I am “merely” trying to get the same percentages of EMV adoption in the US that are shown in the chart above for every other part of the world. Does anyone have current numbers? This is for a high school class discussion of cyber security and I never imagined it would be such a tough piece of data to obtain. (Thank you for the chart on every other country, by the way!)

  • Lee Nicholson

    I am “merely” trying to get the same percentages of EMV adoption in the US that are shown in the chart above for every other part of the world. Does anyone have current numbers? This is for a high school class discussion of cyber security and I never imagined it would be such a tough piece of data to obtain. (Thank you for the chart on every other country, by the way!)

  • GAH

    I think Capital One also has one. Can you get a pin for the chip and signature ones?

  • GAH

    I think Capital One also has one. Can you get a pin for the chip and signature ones?

  • Tracy Jursz

    I have the Andrews Federal Credit Union GlobeTrek Visa Rewards, which is supposed to be Chip and PIN as stated above. I just returned from a trip to London and the card did not function as chip and pin at ANY merchant in London. It was ONLY set up as a chip and signature card, which was greatly disappointing and more than a little inconvenient (as I already had a chip and signature card from another provider). I’m not sure why it didn’t work for me (I have sent the bank a question about this and am waiting to hear back), but I wanted people to know that card is not always set up as chip and pin.

  • Tracy Jursz

    I have the Andrews Federal Credit Union GlobeTrek Visa Rewards, which is supposed to be Chip and PIN as stated above. I just returned from a trip to London and the card did not function as chip and pin at ANY merchant in London. It was ONLY set up as a chip and signature card, which was greatly disappointing and more than a little inconvenient (as I already had a chip and signature card from another provider). I’m not sure why it didn’t work for me (I have sent the bank a question about this and am waiting to hear back), but I wanted people to know that card is not always set up as chip and pin.

  • Benny B

    I’ve been struggling to find information specific to where I’m going– Israel. Do you know any numbers or even have a rough sense of what percentage of vendors there use EMV, and what percentage accept Discover?

    • Simon Spector

      many accept diner’s club, but very few use emv.

  • Benny B

    I’ve been struggling to find information specific to where I’m going– Israel. Do you know any numbers or even have a rough sense of what percentage of vendors there use EMV, and what percentage accept Discover?

  • ToddK

    This article is a bit misleading in the acceptance of Chip and Signature cards outside the U.S. I know that in Great Britain, they want chip and pin. England has many areas that are automated, so they dont take a signature, so the chip and sign cards do not work. (Parking lots, ticket machines) I’ve had the same issue in Canada parking lots too.
    The U.S. is instituting a half measure with Chip and sign. It is not as secure as chip and Pin, and would be a step backwards for European countries to start accepting them.

  • ToddK

    This article is a bit misleading in the acceptance of Chip and Signature cards outside the U.S. I know that in Great Britain, they want chip and pin. England has many areas that are automated, so they dont take a signature, so the chip and sign cards do not work. (Parking lots, ticket machines) I’ve had the same issue in Canada parking lots too.
    The U.S. is instituting a half measure with Chip and sign. It is not as secure as chip and Pin, and would be a step backwards for European countries to start accepting them.

  • Nearmsp

    I hate international travel. American tourists are treated like the plague. I dread handing my Chip and Signature credit cards in Asia. I could not use my chip and signature card in China anywhere other than my hotel. In India it was not that bad. After waiting for years, now US banks are again disappointing everyone and are now not going for chip and pin. I am against regulation, but here I want the banks to be regulated to death for keeping the US behind the whole world in credit card security. Donate to the senator and get all regulation thrown off. Federal reserve is in the pockets of banks in any case.

  • Nearmsp

    I hate international travel. American tourists are treated like the plague. I dread handing my Chip and Signature credit cards in Asia. I could not use my chip and signature card in China anywhere other than my hotel. In India it was not that bad. After waiting for years, now US banks are again disappointing everyone and are now not going for chip and pin. I am against regulation, but here I want the banks to be regulated to death for keeping the US behind the whole world in credit card security. Donate to the senator and get all regulation thrown off. Federal reserve is in the pockets of banks in any case.

  • William Sze

    Its really a very good and informative post, yes, Few people use EMV, my friend want to know about EMV, i am suggesting a name Alliance Bankcard, because i am already using the service and also send this link to know more about EMV.

  • William Sze

    Its really a very good and informative post, yes, Few people use EMV, my friend want to know about EMV, i am suggesting a name Alliance Bankcard, because i am already using the service and also send this link to know more about EMV.

  • BocaNY

    I find it annoying that EMV chips are only available on credit cards here in America. It would be nice to have it on my bank debit card like every other country I have been to has. I called my bank about this again. Citibank told me at first that the cards don’t accept EMV chips. I said that made no sense if you make a card to be pay go/pass then you can surely make one to be EMV.According to citibank the pay pass is accepted around the world and it won’t be rejected, I don’t believe them. I finally got the truth out of the guy and the real reason that it’s not found on debit cards is because it’s TOO EXPENSIVE the technology. Really?!?! they are that cheap with all the money they get off fees from their costumers. Any way the only bank to have EMV chips on their day to day debit cards is BAnk of America. I assume it’s a chip n pin one.

    • http://blog.forrestshields.com/ Forrest C. Shields II

      I just got two of my debit cards from Wells Fargo re-issued with EMV chip-and-PIN technology with no problem. Although they did have to transfer me to a manager to do it. For the PIN it re-uses my ATM PIN number, so there is nothing new for me to memorize. And there was no extra cost to me to have the cards re-issued.

    • Drew

      My debit card has a chip Charles Schwab Bank.

    • kirby123

      @bocany:disqus I am with JP Morgan Chase and I was able to upgrade to a Chip-enabled Debit card the other day just by walking into a branch and asking.

  • BocaNY

    I find it annoying that EMV chips are only available on credit cards here in America. It would be nice to have it on my bank debit card like every other country I have been to has. I called my bank about this again. Citibank told me at first that the cards don’t accept EMV chips. I said that made no sense if you make a card to be pay go/pass then you can surely make one to be EMV.According to citibank the pay pass is accepted around the world and it won’t be rejected, I don’t believe them. I finally got the truth out of the guy and the real reason that it’s not found on debit cards is because it’s TOO EXPENSIVE the technology. Really?!?! they are that cheap with all the money they get off fees from their costumers. Any way the only bank to have EMV chips on their day to day debit cards is BAnk of America. I assume it’s a chip n pin one.

  • JOSEPH DOURADO

    BOXERGDOG321

  • JOSEPH DOURADO

    BOXERGDOG321

  • Stanley Ho

    I read on another forum that the Andrews card will function as “Chip-and-PIN” only if it is unattended. If there is an attendant that can accept your signature then the priority is to use “Chip-and-Signature” first.

  • Stanley Ho

    I read on another forum that the Andrews card will function as “Chip-and-PIN” only if it is unattended. If there is an attendant that can accept your signature then the priority is to use “Chip-and-Signature” first.

  • freedda

    What this article does not make clear is that U.S. banks are, for the most part, still doing us a disservice by only offering ‘chip and sign’ cards, not true ‘chip and pin’ cards. The former still will not universally work in Europe and other places. An article about this new technology should make that clear, instead of merely serving as thinnly veiled advertising copy for credit card offers. Not accurate (on purpose), and therefore mostly worthless.

    • kirby123

      I don’t know what other banks are doing, but I think Chase Bank says on their website that only Chase-issued credit cards are Chip-and-Signature, and that chip-enabled debit cards (tied to a checking account) should function as a proper Chip-and-Pin card outside the US…

      • Ezra Tank

        Yes but who wants to use a debit card while traveling? I cannot believe that ALL banks world wide aren’t using CHIP + PIN cards by now. How many more Target hacks or massive stolen credit card number stories do we have to read before they all change?

        Yes I get it will initially cost money up front to change card readers to CHIP + PIN but how many billions do these banks “lose” each year to fraud?

  • freedda

    What this article does not make clear is that U.S. banks are, for the most part, still doing us a disservice by only offering ‘chip and sign’ cards, not true ‘chip and pin’ cards. The former still will not universally work in Europe and other places. An article about this new technology should make that clear, instead of merely serving as thinnly veiled advertising copy for credit card offers. Not accurate (on purpose), and therefore mostly worthless.

  • Peter

    Does the Bank Of America Travel Rewards card offer Chip & PIN? It wasn’t mentioned in the article if it does, it just mentions it has a chip (implying it could just be chip and signature). Or is Barclay Arrival the only one that has CHIP & PIN right now? Thanks.

    • Drew

      BOA Travel Rewards card is Chip and Signature.

  • Peter

    Does the Bank Of America Travel Rewards card offer Chip & PIN? It wasn’t mentioned in the article if it does, it just mentions it has a chip (implying it could just be chip and signature). Or is Barclay Arrival the only one that has CHIP & PIN right now? Thanks.

  • Eileen

    Can this chip be read while still in your pocket or purse?

  • Eileen

    Can this chip be read while still in your pocket or purse?

  • salharmonic

    What about ATMs in Italy? Is a strip debit card going to work? They are not upgrading debit cards to chips as fast as they are credit cards here in the U.S.

    • kirby123

      I highly doubt you will find an ATM anywhere in Europe that can take a magnetic stripe card. If you have a debit card at a major bank, like JPMC, you should be able to get a Chip-EMV card by simply walking into a branch and asking. I have a checking account with Chase Bank, and for that I had a Stripe card with the blink feature; I walked into a local branch the other day and explained to a banker that I wanted to upgrade to a chip card. He said ok, took my license and my debit card, and then gave me a brand new card, with the exact same number, expiration, and CVV, just with the EMV chip on the left side of the front of the card.

      • JaimeLobo

        AFAIK, *all* the ATM in Europe work with mag stripes. We have always used our regular U.S. ATM card all over Europe with no trouble.

        • Ezra Tank

          Exactly. ATM cards always required a PIN.

      • JaimeLobo

        AFAIK, *all* the ATM in Europe work with mag stripes. We have always used our regular U.S. ATM card all over Europe with no trouble.

  • salharmonic

    What about ATMs in Italy? Is a strip debit card going to work? They are not upgrading debit cards to chips as fast as they are credit cards here in the U.S.

  • Drew

    Capital One all of there cards are chip and signature

    • Makho Ushveridze

      Hi Drew,
      called fidelity rewards amex and card will be on it’s way in a week, thank you.
      also called capital one but they said that they only offer pin and sign to venture card holders, not cash rewards, what a bummer…

  • Drew

    Capital One all of there cards are chip and signature

  • Karen Stryker

    I need a secured card with a chip. Does one exist?

  • Karen Stryker

    I need a secured card with a chip. Does one exist?

  • dennphill

    When I saw chips on the pictures of cards, I (wrongly!) assumed we were talking of ‘chip and PIN’…now I find that almost all are ‘chip and signature’! What CRAP. (Sorry, hope this goes through, still.) I was trying to get away from my USAA MC with a chip and PIN that worked well last year – Russia, Scandinavia, Germany – but it had no points or cashback with it. So I just applied, and got approved for (waiting on the mail), a CapOne Quicksilver card and find my wife also recently applied for a Venture card. Now I find – confirmed by the CapOne reps – that these are both ‘chip and signature’ cards. Worthless to us for international travel! (Don’t care what Rick Steves says about how you just have to go up to a nearby clerk and ask to sign. That doesn’t work in the toll lane on an Autostrada!) Boy, what a disappointment. My error in assuming that a chip meant there would be a PIN sent with the card! Nerdwallet – you guys need to go back to the drawing boards and tell us folks trying to get smart (and get cashback or points deals) which of theses cards DO have PINs…and can be easily used worldwide! And you card issuers….get smart and get with he program!

    • http://www.nerdwallet.com/ NerdWallet

      Sorry for the confusion! It’s true that, right now, most chip-enabled credit cards issued in the U.S. are chip-and-signature, not chip-and-PIN. This might make some overseas transactions less convenient, but chip-and-signature does provide added security over swipe-and-sign. The Nerds will be sure to keep you updated if more PIN-capable cards enter the market!

      • rush2112

        Barclays credit cards are chip and PIN and chip and signature. I have the Barclay Ring and the Barclay Extra Points credit cards. According to Barclaycard, your PIN is the same for chip card readers and ATM transactions. The Barclay Ring credit card is the perfect for traveling to Europe. It also has no foreign transaction fees.

  • dennphill

    When I saw chips on the pictures of cards, I (wrongly!) assumed we were talking of ‘chip and PIN’…now I find that almost all are ‘chip and signature’! What CRAP. (Sorry, hope this goes through, still.) I was trying to get away from my USAA MC with a chip and PIN that worked well last year – Russia, Scandinavia, Germany – but it had no points or cashback with it. So I just applied, and got approved for (waiting on the mail), a CapOne Quicksilver card and find my wife also recently applied for a Venture card. Now I find – confirmed by the CapOne reps – that these are both ‘chip and signature’ cards. Worthless to us for international travel! (Don’t care what Rick Steves says about how you just have to go up to a nearby clerk and ask to sign. That doesn’t work in the toll lane on an Autostrada!) Boy, what a disappointment. My error in assuming that a chip meant there would be a PIN sent with the card! Nerdwallet – you guys need to go back to the drawing boards and tell us folks trying to get smart (and get cashback or points deals) which of theses cards DO have PINs…and can be easily used worldwide! And you card issuers….get smart and get with he program!

  • APEX

    I
    am Dr William and i want to share my testimony on how i got the blank
    ATM card. I was so wrecked that my company fired me simply because i did
    not obliged to their terms, so they hacked into my system and phone and
    makes it so difficult to get any other job, i did all i could but
    things kept getting worse by the day that i couldn’t afford my 3 kids
    fees and pay light bills. I owe so many people trying to borrow money to
    survive because my old company couldn’t allow me get another job and
    they did all they could to destroy my life just for declining to amongst
    their evil deeds. haven’t given up i kept searching for job online when
    i came across the testimony of a lady called Vanessa regarding how she
    got the blank ATM card. Due to my present state, i had to get in touch
    with Hacking organization and i was told the procedures and along with
    their terms which i agreed to abide and i was told that the Blank card
    will be deliver to me without any further delay and i hold on to their
    words and to my greatest surprise, i received an ATM card worth
    $50.000million Usd. All Thanks to the{atmmachine199@gmail.com