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Best High-Yield Online Savings Accounts of July 2024: Up to 5.45%

NerdWallet's list of the best high-interest savings accounts.

Profile photo of Margarette Burnette
Senior Writer
Profile photo of Yuliya Goldshteyn
Assigning Editor
Fact Checked

Many, or all, of the products featured on this page are from our advertising partners who compensate us when you take certain actions on our website or click to take an action on their website. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own. Here is a list of our partners and here's how we make money.

Strict editorial guidelines to ensure fairness and accuracy in our coverage to help you choose the financial accounts that work best for you. See our criteria for evaluating banks and credit unions.

More than 90 financial institutions surveyed by our team of experts.

More than 50 data points considered for each bank and credit union to be eligible for our roundups. For this specific page, more than five data points were considered per institution.

High-yield savings accounts are ideal places to park your money when you want your savings to grow. NerdWallet’s best high-yield savings accounts have annual percentage yields, or APYs, that are about 10 times higher than the national average rate of 0.45%.

Many of the best rates in this list top 5%, which is especially rewarding considering that inflation is currently below 4%.

APYs have gone up because of Federal Reserve rate increases, making now a good time to open a high-yield savings account. The options featured below will boost your emergency fund and help you save up for big purchases. Check the bottom of the page for more information about how these financial accounts work.

APYs shown are current as of July 18, 2024. All other information is current as of July 1, 2024.

Best savings rates of 5% or more

Here are the institutions on this list with APYs of 5% or more.

My Banking Direct, 5.45% APY

UFB Direct, 5.25% APY

Upgrade, 5.21% APY

Bread Savings, 5.15% APY

Bread Savings says:

All Bread Savings APYs are accurate as of 01/18/2024. APYs are subject to change at any time without notice. Offers apply to personal accounts only. Fees may reduce earnings. For high-yield savings accounts, a minimum of $100 is required and must be deposited in a single transaction. For high-yield savings accounts, the rate may change after the account is opened.

Bask Bank, 5.10% APY

BMO Alto, 5.10% APY

EverBank, 5.05% APY

Popular Direct, 5.05% APY

TAB Bank, 5.02% APY

CIBC U.S., 5.01% APY

Salem Five Direct, 5.01% APY

CIT Bank, 5.00% APY

LendingClub, 5.00% APY

Varo, 3.00% APY (5.00% if certain requirements are met.)

Strict editorial guidelines to ensure fairness and accuracy in our coverage to help you choose the financial accounts that work best for you. See our criteria for evaluating banks and credit unions.

More than 90 financial institutions surveyed by our team of experts.

More than 50 data points considered for each bank and credit union to be eligible for our roundups. For this specific page, more than five data points were considered per institution.

High-yield savings accounts are ideal places to park your money when you want your savings to grow. NerdWallet’s best high-yield savings accounts have annual percentage yields, or APYs, that are about 10 times higher than the national average rate of 0.45%.

Many of the best rates in this list top 5%, which is especially rewarding considering that inflation is currently below 4%.

APYs have gone up because of Federal Reserve rate increases, making now a good time to open a high-yield savings account. The options featured below will boost your emergency fund and help you save up for big purchases. Check the bottom of the page for more information about how these financial accounts work.

APYs shown are current as of July 18, 2024. All other information is current as of July 1, 2024.

Best savings rates of 5% or more

Here are the institutions on this list with APYs of 5% or more.

My Banking Direct, 5.45% APY

UFB Direct, 5.25% APY

Upgrade, 5.21% APY

Bread Savings, 5.15% APY

Bread Savings says:

All Bread Savings APYs are accurate as of 01/18/2024. APYs are subject to change at any time without notice. Offers apply to personal accounts only. Fees may reduce earnings. For high-yield savings accounts, a minimum of $100 is required and must be deposited in a single transaction. For high-yield savings accounts, the rate may change after the account is opened.

Bask Bank, 5.10% APY

BMO Alto, 5.10% APY

EverBank, 5.05% APY

Popular Direct, 5.05% APY

TAB Bank, 5.02% APY

CIBC U.S., 5.01% APY

Salem Five Direct, 5.01% APY

CIT Bank, 5.00% APY

LendingClub, 5.00% APY

Varo, 3.00% APY (5.00% if certain requirements are met.)

🤓Nerdy Tip

Today’s high rates may not last forever. Take advantage of them while you can with a federally insured high-yield savings account.

Best High-Yield Online Savings Accounts of July 2024: Up to 5.45% From Our Partners

ELIGIBLE FOR REWARD

ELIGIBLE FOR $100 IN REWARDS
NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
SoFi Checking and Savings
Learn more

at SoFi Bank, N.A., Member FDIC

APY

4.60%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

$300

Earn up to $300 with direct deposit. Terms apply.

Why We Like It

SoFi Checking and Savings is a combination checking and savings account that earns an APY of 4.60% (variable and subject to change) on the money you keep in the savings portion of the account. To earn that rate, you'll need to do one of the following: Set up direct deposit in any amount, or make manual deposits of at least $5,000 every 30 days. Without either a direct deposit or the minimum manual deposit, you’ll earn 1.20% APY on your savings balance.

Some banks that offer high-yield savings accounts don’t offer checking accounts, so you have to look elsewhere to meet your checking needs. But SoFi combines both, and the money you keep in the checking portion of the account earns 0.50% APY with or without deposits (APY is variable and subject to change).

There’s no minimum deposit requirement to open an account and there is no monthly maintenance fee either.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
EverBank Performance℠ Savings
Learn more

at EverBank, Member FDIC

APY

5.05%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

The EverBank savings account checks the boxes for what you’d expected from a top high-yield product. It earns a competitive APY, there is no minimum to open an account and there is no monthly fee. EverBank also offers CDs, a high-yield money market account and an interest checking account with ATM fee reimbursements. You can keep all your bank accounts at one institution, which can make it easier to track your budget.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
Bask Interest Savings Account
Learn more

at Bask Bank, Member FDIC

APY

5.10%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

This savings account earns a competitive yield. Compared to the average national savings rate, which is 0.45%, an account with a high yield helps your balance grow faster over time.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
UFB Secure Savings
Learn more

at UFB Direct, Member FDIC

APY

5.25%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

The competitive yield on this savings account helps your money grow faster than it would in a lower-rate account. You get a bigger bank balance without extra effort on your part.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
Capital One 360 Performance Savings™
Learn more

at Capital One, Member FDIC

APY

4.25%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

This savings account earns the same rate on all balances. There are no minimum deposit requirements to open an account and no monthly fees. The bank also offers a checking account that earns interest and has no monthly fees.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
Marcus by Goldman Sachs Online Savings Account
Learn more

at Goldman Sachs Bank USA, Member FDIC

APY

4.40%

With $0 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

This savings account does not charge monthly fees, and there is no minimum balance required to the 4.40% APY. You'll be able to access your account through multiple options, such as mobile app and desktop. Be advised that the bank doesn’t offer a checking account.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
CIT Bank Platinum Savings
Learn more

at CIT Bank, Member FDIC

APY

5.00%

With $5,000 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

CIT’s Platinum Savings account pays 5.00% APY on balances of $5,000 or more. If your balance dips below $5,000, it earns a paltry 0.25% APY.

If you tend to carry high balances — at least $5,000 — this account is worth a look. If you don't plan to deposit that amount, however, the bank also offers other savings accounts with yields that are better than 0.25% APY. But the top rates on those accounts aren't has high as the Platinum Savings rate. Keep in mind there are high-yield accounts at other banks that don’t have this high deposit requirement.

Despite the higher threshold to earn the high rate, the account’s minimum opening deposit is only $100. There is also no monthly fee.

NerdWallet rating 

4.5

/5
American Express® High Yield Savings Account
Learn more

at American Express National Bank, Member FDIC

APY

4.25%

With $1 min. balance for APY

Bonus

N/A

Why We Like It

The well-known credit card company offers a savings account with a competitive yield, a $0 monthly fee and $0 minimum balance requirement to open the account and a $1 minimum to start earning interest.

If you like to earn interest on all your deposits, the bank also offers a competitive rewards checking account. That checking account is available only to consumers who have had an American Express credit card for at least three months. If you're already a credit card customer, or plan to be, this bank offers a complete package with its checking and savings options. If you're only interested in savings, the high-yield savings account is still worth considering.

American Express says: "Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any savings product issuer."

Our Nerds say:

“When choosing a savings account, a high rate isn’t the only thing you’ll want to consider. You’ll want to see whether there are any monthly fees or withdrawal limits. It’s also important to pick an account that meets your overall banking needs. If you want your checking and savings accounts to be at the same bank, for example, you’ll want to go with an institution that offers both checking and high-yield savings.”

- Margarette Burnette, NerdWallet banking writer

Here is more information about high-yield savings accounts.

What is a high-yield savings account?

A high-yield savings account is a type of federally insured savings product that earns rates that are much better than the national average. They can earn around 5%. By comparison, the national average rate is 0.45%.

» Looking for the top overall online-only banks? Check out NerdWallet's picks for best online banks

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Is it worth putting money into a high-yield savings account?

Yes. With a high-yield savings account, also known as a high-interest savings account, your balance can grow faster over time than it would in an average savings account. This is without additional effort on your part. Your money is working harder for you in a higher-rate account.

What is the difference between a high-yield savings account and a traditional savings account?

A high-yield savings account earns a much higher rate than a regular savings account. While some traditional savings accounts, particularly those at large national banks, earn rates as low as 0.01% APY, high-yield accounts earn many times more. Currently, rates at the best high-yield accounts earn around 5% APY.

When are savings rates going to fall?

The Fed has kept the federal funds rate steady over the last year or so in efforts to tame inflation. And savings rates have largely held steady in that same timeframe. In early 2024, experts predicted rate cuts at some point in the year. Due to market conditions, they remain elevated. That’s good news for savers. The new expectation is that there will be a rate cut in September 2024, though it’s tough to say whether that prediction will hold and how far or fast savings rates will drop.

Alternatives to high-yield savings accounts

High-yield savings account vs money market account

High-yield savings accounts and money market accounts are both types of savings accounts, but MMAs typically offer debit cards and checks, with the ability to make a few purchases each month. Both types of accounts generally let you link to other deposit accounts, such as checking accounts, to make electronic withdrawals and deposits. But with the added benefit of debit cards or checks, money market accounts give easier access to your funds. This can be helpful if you need fast access to your cash. However, some MMAs also charge monthly fees and have high minimum opening deposits.

» Want to explore more? See our list of the best money market accounts

High-yield savings account vs certificate of deposit (CD)

High-yield savings accounts and certificates of deposit are both federally insured deposit accounts, but CDs tend to have higher rates in return for locking in your money for a set time period. CDs are best for funds that can be put away for the entire CD term, which can typically range from a few months to five years or more. If you have a short-term savings goal for an item you’d like to purchase in a few years, consider opening a CD. Funds in high-yield savings accounts can generally be withdrawn at any time, though there may be a limit of six per month for certain types of withdrawals. Compared to a CD, a high-yield savings account is a better option for an emergency fund.

» Learn more about the best CD rates

High-yield savings account vs checking account

The difference between a high-yield savings account and a checking account is that a high-yield savings account is used for building your account balance, while a checking account is used for everyday spending. Some checking accounts earn interest or offer cash-back rewards, but a high-yield savings account likely pays more interest, though it may also limit certain types of withdrawals to a maximum of six per month. » Looking for online checking? Read about the best online checking accounts

What are the benefits of the best savings account rates?

Earning more interest means your bank balance can grow faster over time. When an account earns a high rate, say 5% APY, you have the potential to earn more than 10 times what you would in an account with an APY that earns half of a percent. (See next question for an example.)

How much will $10,000 make in a high-yield savings account?

If your money is in an account that earns a strong rate, your balance will grow faster without any additional effort on your part. With a 5% APY, a savings balance of $10,000 would earn a bit more than $500 after a year. It may not make you rich, but the earnings are much better than an account with a 0.40% APY, which would earn about $40 dollars.

How do I choose the best high-interest savings accounts?

Look for accounts that have high interest rates and low service charges. You want to make sure you don’t have to pay a fee each month. Some institutions don’t charge monthly fees, while others do but will waive them if you meet a balance minimum.

Be willing to look beyond the larger, well-known banks. Many smaller institutions — including online banks and apps — feature good rates and low deposit requirements.

» Want to explore checking accounts instead? Take a look at NerdWallet’s best checking accounts

High-yield savings accounts: Pros and cons

Here's a look at benefits and drawbacks of typical high-yield savings accounts compared with other ways to grow your funds.

High-yield savings account pros:

  • Earns higher rates than other savings accounts.

  • Is a deposit account, so it has federal insurance (unlike investments).

  • Typically can be opened online, without the need to leave your home.

High-yield savings account cons:

  • Sometimes requires a higher minimum opening balance compared with regular savings accounts.

  • While they can be opened online (a pro), some are online-only, so face-to-face customer service is not an option.

The highest APY savings accounts are easy to access

With online banking, you can access your account securely day or night. Online banks, credit unions and nonbank providers offer some of the best savings rates on the market while charging fewer fees than traditional banks. They also often offer good websites and mobile apps that typically let customers deposit checks and pay bills.

How to open an account with the best interest rates

Depending on the type of financial institution, you can open an account either online or in person. You’ll need to provide your Social Security number and contact information, along with at least one form of identification, such as a driver’s license or a passport. (For a joint account, everyone wanting access to the account must provide this information and ID.) You will often be required to deposit money into the new account right away. You can do that by depositing cash or checks, or through a wire transfer.

» Find high rates across checking, savings and other accounts in NerdWallet's list of high-interest accounts

What to do if you can’t open a high-interest savings account

Occasionally, your application to open an account may not be approved. This is likely because of issues with your previous banking history.

Unpaid bank fees and bounced checks can result in a negative file on ChexSystems, a consumer reporting agency that financial institutions use to evaluate a prospective customer’s banking history.

There are options for customers who have a ChexSystems file, including opportunities to open alternative accounts. For more information, read our primer on what to do if you have a ChexSystems record.

Are high-yield savings accounts safe?

In short, yes. High-yield savings accounts at banks and credit unions are federally insured up to $250,000 per depositor, and many nonbank providers partner with banks for insurance. Accounts at banks are backed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., while credit union accounts are backed by the National Credit Union Administration. This means that even if the financial institution fails, the government makes sure your money is safe and accessible. Read NerdWallet's primer on FDIC insurance to learn more.

What’s the difference when NerdWallet notes “Member FDIC” vs. “funds insured by FDIC” on savings accounts?

When we describe a savings account that is offered by a bank, we note “Member FDIC,” since the bank is a member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the account is federally insured. If a financial technology company — not a bank — offers a savings account, it typically partners with a bank that is an FDIC member to hold the funds so deposits can be insured. In those cases, we note “funds insured by the FDIC.” Savings accounts at credit unions are federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration, so we note “funds insured by the NCUA.”

Should I have more than one savings account?

Having multiple savings accounts can be helpful in organizing separate savings goals. For example, you could open one savings account to cover emergencies and another to save for your next vacation.

Do I have to pay taxes on my savings account?

The interest you earn in a savings account is generally taxable, according to the Internal Revenue Service. Near the beginning of the calendar year, in time to file your taxes, your financial institution may send you a form 1099-INT reporting if you earned more than $10 in interest the previous year. When you receive this form, be sure to check it against your own bank account records for accuracy. Even if you don’t receive this tax form, the IRS states that the interest you earn in any amount is taxable. Be sure to check with a tax advisor to know your reporting requirements.

High-yield savings account terminology

Here’s a look at some important savings terms to know.

Savings account: A deposit account from a financial institution that earns interest.

Money market account: A type of savings account that often offers higher interest rates in return for a steep minimum deposit. (Think $5,000 or more.)

Interest: Money a financial institution pays into an account over time.

Compound interest: Compound interest is the interest you earn on both your original money and on the interest you keep accumulating. In an account that pays compound interest, the return is added to the original principal at the end of every compounding period, typically daily or monthly. Each time interest is calculated and added to the account, the larger balance earns more interest.

Annual percentage yield: The APY, or annual percentage yield, is the amount of compound interest an account earns in a year. The calculation is based on the account's interest rate and the number of times interest is paid during the year. A savings account with the highest APY grows faster than an account with a lower yield.

Do the best online savings accounts have fixed rates?

No, rates are variable and can change over time. This is true for all savings accounts, whether they are online or offered by traditional banks, and whether they pay a high rate or a low one. The accounts featured in this article are among those with the consistently highest rates. But if you’re looking for a product that earns a fixed rate, and you’re willing to keep the money in the account for a set time period — without withdrawals — consider a certificate of deposit.

How often do high savings rates change?

Institutions typically don’t change savings rates hourly, daily or even weekly. It’s common to see some rates remain unchanged for several months.

But rates are variable and can theoretically change at any time. In addition, many providers will adjust their rates based on their competitors’ actions. As a result, you will often see groups of financial institutions increase or decrease their APYs around the same time, especially if the Federal Reserve recently hiked or cut rates.

Check out the best rates regularly to get the best yield for your money.

Which bank gives 7% interest on savings accounts?

The banks we have surveyed don't have rates as high as 7%, though many have rates north of 5%. When we analyze banks for this list, we look at a number of factors, including minimum balance requirements and monthly fees. Our full editorial list provides several options that earn high rates and offer a solid banking experience.

🤓Nerdy Tip

If a savings account has a high introductory rate, or short-term high APY from a referral code, but pays a lower yield long term, you may be better off choosing a higher-yield account in the first place. You can use an interest calculator to calculate how much you can earn over a period of years.

What is the highest-paying high-yield savings account?

Currently, the institution on our best high-yield savings account list with the highest APY is My Banking Direct. Its savings account currently earns a 5.45% APY.

Full list of editorial picks: best high-yield online savings accounts

When selecting the best high-yield online savings accounts, NerdWallet uses multiple data points, including monthly fees, minimum balance requirements, APY, mobile app ratings and customer service availability. Click the financial institution’s name in the table below to read a full review.

Financial Institution

NerdWallet Overall Institution Rating

APY

Minimum balance to open

My Banking Direct, Member FDIC.

4.0.

5.45%.

$500 minimum to open account.

TAB Bank, Member FDIC.

4.5.

5.02%.

No minimum to open account.

UFB Direct, Member FDIC.

4.5.

Over the past year, NerdWallet readers have described delays in getting issues resolved through customer support. These complaints don't factor into UFB Direct's star ratings. Please read the full review for more details.

5.25%.

No minimum to open account.

Upgrade, funds insured by FDIC.

4.5.

5.21%.

No minimum to open account.

Bread Savings™, funds insured by FDIC.

4.5.

5.15%.

Bread Savings adds: "All Bread Savings APYs are accurate as of 01/18/2024. APYs are subject to change at any time without notice. Offers apply to personal accounts only. Fees may reduce earnings. For high-yield savings accounts, a minimum of $100 is required and must be deposited in a single transaction. For high-yield savings accounts, the rate may change after the account is opened."

FDIC insurance up to $250,000 per depositor for each ownership category.

$100 minimum to open account.

Bask Bank, Member FDIC.

4.5.

5.10%.

No minimum to open account.

BMO Alto, Member FDIC.

4.5.

5.10%.

No minimum to open account.

EverBank (formerly TIAA Bank), Member FDIC.

4.5.

5.05%.

No minimum to open account.

Popular Direct, Member FDIC.

4.0.

5.05%.

$100 minimum to open.

CIBC U.S., Member FDIC.

3.5.

5.01%.

$1,000 minimum to open account.

Salem Five Direct, Member FDIC.

4.0.

5.01%.

$10 minimum to open account.

CIT Bank, Member FDIC.

4.0.

5.00%.

$100 minimum to open account.

LendingClub, Member FDIC.

4.5.

5.00%.

$100 minimum to open account.

First Foundation Bank, Member FDIC.

3.5.

4.90%.

$1,000 minimum to open account.

Synchrony Bank, Member FDIC.

4.5.

4.75%.

No minimum to open account.

ConnectOne Bank, Member FDIC.

3.5.

4.60%.

$2,500 minimum to open account.

SoFi, Member FDIC.

5.0.

4.60% (variable and subject to change).

No minimum to open account.

Quontic Bank, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.50%.

$100 minimum to open account.

Sallie Mae Bank, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.50%.

No minimum to open account.

Citizens, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.50%.

$0.01 minimum to open account.

Live Oak Bank, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.40%.

No minimum to open account.

4.5.

4.40%.

No minimum to open account.

Barclays, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.35%.

No minimum to open account.

Citibank, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.30%.

No minimum to open account.

American Express, Member FDIC.

4.0.

4.25% APY (annual percentage yield) as of 04/25/2024.

Minimum to open = $0.

Capital One 360, Member FDIC.

4.5.

4.25%.

No minimum to open account.

Discover® Bank, Member FDIC.

4.5.

4.25%.

No minimum to open account.

Varo, Member FDIC.

4.5.

3.00% (5.00% if certain requirements are met.)

No minimum to open account.

» Interested in getting money from banks? See NerdWallet's best bank account promotions and bonuses

Historical savings rates

The table below shows movement that some financial institutions have seen with savings rates over the last few months. We chose a few online institutions and two national banks to compare.

Note: Rates are accessed at the beginning of the month unless otherwise noted. Current rates may change at any time.

July 2024

June 2024

May 2024

April 2024

March 2024

February 2024

January 2024

December 2023

November 2023

October 2023

September 2023

August 2023

July 2023

June 2023

May 2023

April 2023

March 2023

February 2023

January 2023

December 2022

November 2022

October 2022

September 2022

August 2022

July 2022

June 2022

May 2022

Online institutions

Ally, Member FDIC.

4.20% APY.

4.20% APY.

4.20% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.35% APY.

4.35% APY.

4.35% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.00% APY.

3.85% APY.

3.75% APY.

3.75% APY.

3.40% APY.

3.40% APY.

3.30% APY.

3.30% APY.

3.00% APY.

2.35% APY.

1.85% APY.

1.85% APY.

1.25% APY.

1.00% APY.

0.60% APY.

CIT Bank, Member FDIC.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

5.05% APY.

4.95% APY.

4.85% APY.

4.75% APY.

4.50% APY.

4.05% APY.

4.05% APY.

4.05% APY.

3.85% APY.

3.60% APY.

3.00% APY.

2.10% APY.

2.10% APY.

1.90% APY.

1.20% APY.

0.90% APY.

LendingClub, Member FDIC.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

5.00% APY.

4.65% APY.

4.65% APY.

4.50% APY.

4.50% APY.

4.50% APY.

4.50% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.25% APY.

4.00% APY.

4.00% APY.

4.00% APY.

3.60% APY.

3.25% APY.

3.12% APY.

2.07% APY.

2.07% APY.

2.07% APY.

1.26% APY.

0.85% APY.

National brick-and-mortar banks

Bank of America, Member FDIC.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

Chase Bank, Member FDIC.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

0.01% APY.

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0.01% APY.

APY data for July 2024 accessed on July 1, 2024. APY data for June 2024 accessed on June 3, 2024. APY data for May 2024 accessed on May 1, 2024. APY data for April 2024 accessed on April 1, 2024. APY data for March 2024 accessed on March 1, 2024. APY data for February 2024 accessed on February 1, 2024. APY data for January 2024 accessed on January 2, 2024. APY data for December 2023 accessed on December 1, 2023. APY data for November 2023 accessed on November 8, 2023. APY data for October 2023 accessed on October 2, 2023. APY data for September 2023 accessed on September 18, 2023. APY data for August 2023 accessed on August 1, 2023. APY data for July 2023 accessed on July 13, 2023. APY data for June 2023 accessed on June 1, 2023. APY data for May 2023 accessed on May 3, 2023. APY data for April 2023 accessed on April 3, 2023. APY data for March 2023 accessed on March 3, 2023. APY data for February 2023 accessed on February 3, 2023. APY data for January 2023 accessed on January 17, 2023. APY data for December 2022 accessed on December 20, 2022. APY data for November 2022 accessed on November 30, 2022. APY data for October 2022 accessed on October 31, 2022. APY data for September 2022 accessed on September 6, 2022. APY data for August 2022 accessed on August 30, 2022. APY data for July 2022 accessed on July 29, 2022. APY data for June 2022 accessed on June 29, 2022. APY data for May 2022 accessed on May 26, 2022.

Last updated on July 15, 2024

Methodology

We took a close look at over 90 financial institutions and financial service providers, including the largest U.S. banks based on assets, internet search traffic and other factors; the nation’s largest credit unions, based on assets and membership; and other notable and/or emerging players in the industry. We rated them on criteria including annual percentage yields, minimum balances, fees, digital experience and more.

Financial institutions and providers surveyed are: Affirm, All America Bank, Alliant Credit Union, Ally Bank, Amalgamated Bank, America First Credit Union, American Express National Bank, Andrews Federal Credit Union, Associated Bank, Axos Bank, Bank of America, Bank5 Connect, Barclays, Bask Bank, Bethpage Federal Credit Union, BMO, BMO Alto, Boeing Employees Credit Union, Bread Savings, BrioDirect, Capital One, Carver Federal Savings Bank, Charles Schwab Bank, Chase, Chime, CIBC U.S., CIT Bank, Citibank, Citizens, Citizens Bank, City First Bank, Climate First Bank, Commerce Bank, Community First Credit Union of Florida, ConnectOne Bank, Connexus Credit Union, Consumers Credit Union, Current, Customers Bank, Delta Community Credit Union, Discover® Bank, E*TRADE, EverBank (formerly TIAA Bank), Fifth Third Bank, First Foundation, First National Bank, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Flagstar Bank, FNBO Direct, Global Credit Union, GO2bank, Golden 1 Credit Union, Greenwood, Hope Credit Union, Huntington Bank, Industrial Bank, Ivy Bank, Jenius Bank, KeyBank, Lake Michigan Credit Union, Laurel Road Bank, LendingClub Bank, Liberty Bank, Live Oak Bank, M&T Bank, Marcus by Goldman Sachs, My Banking Direct, NASA Federal Credit Union, Navy Federal Credit Union, NBKC, One, OneUnited Bank, Pentagon Federal Credit Union, PNC, Popular Direct, Quontic Bank, Regions Bank, Revolut, Salem Five Direct, Sallie Mae Bank, Santander Bank, SchoolsFirst Federal Credit Union, Security Service Federal Credit Union, Securityplus Federal Credit Union, Self-Help Credit Union, Service Credit Union, SoFi, State Employees’ Credit Union of North Carolina, Suncoast Credit Union, Synchrony Bank, TAB Bank, TD Bank, Truist Bank, U.S. Bank, UFB Direct, Upgrade, USAA Bank, Varo, Vio Bank, Wells Fargo, Western Alliance Bank and Zynlo Bank.

To recap our selections...

NerdWallet's Best High-Yield Online Savings Accounts of July 2024: Up to 5.45%